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TRASH

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633 divers collect over 1,500 pounds of trash at a Florida beach -- and set a world record

By Michelle Lou, 

 

 

Updated 5:30 PM ET, Sun June 16, 2019 

 

 

A record-setting 633 divers came from as far as Europe and South America to participate in the underwater cleanup.

Hundreds of divers donned their wetsuits and air tanks on Saturday to become the largest group to conduct an underwater cleanup.

The Guinness World Record-setting 633 divers retrieved at least 1,626 pounds of trash and 60 pounds of fishing line at the Deerfield Beach International Fishing Pier in Florida. 

The official weight of the trash recovered is still being tallied, and the number is likely to grow, said Tyler Bourgoine, who participated in and helped organize the cleanup. Ocean conservation group Project AWARE estimates that the cleanup might have removed as much as 3,200 pounds of marine debris.

"There were countless lead sinkers ... everything from a boat ladder to a barbell," Bourgoine told CNN.

 

 

The city of Deerfield Beach will help recyle and dispose of the debris collected.

The city will help with recycling the debris and ensure everything is disposed of properly.

Divers came from as far away as Europe and South America to participate in the event, organized annually by local dive shop Dixie Divers and Deerfield Beach Women's Club. This year was the 15th cleanup began at around 9 a.m. and lasted about two hours

"It was a great time ... Everyone was working together and cleaning up one part of the reef or pier," Bourgoine told CNN. 

The area the divers cleaned has tons of marine life. 

"That's one of the reasons why there's so much debris," Bourgoine said. "People are constantly fishing there."

 

Ahmed Gabr, a former Egyptian Army scuba diver, set the previous record in 2015 with 613 other divers in the Red Sea in Egypt.

Plastic and other human-produced waste have become a growing presence and problem in the oceans. About 8 million metric tons of plastic enter the ocean annually -- equivalent to the weight of nearly 90 aircraft carriers, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Edited by TimS
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Posted (edited) · Report post

Part or the trash

There were countless lead sinkers ... everything from a boat ladder to a barbell," Bourgoine told CNN.
 
The city of Deerfield Beach will help recyle and dispose of the debris collected.
 
AND
60lbs of fishing line?
 
Edited by ccb

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We can all do better!

 

Fill a bag with trash when you leave. 

 

Cut and remove line that was left behind. 

 

Leave no trace, better yet, leave the place better than you found it. 

 

Tell people when they “left something.”

(Usually get a dirty look but I.D.G.A.F.)

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Posted (edited) · Report post

 Looks to me like it’s just a bunch of stuff people got hung up on the pier and broke their line.

Yes trash in our oceans is a problem however, they seem to be sensationalizing a particular non-issue.

Would be nice to have a link or cite where that writing came from

 

Jennettes pier in Nags Head NC has divers remove all that stuff about every two years. Two divers to do the whole 1000 foot pier. 

Edited by 1badf350

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I agree, it appears to be snagged lines from under the pier. We have all seen places where this occurs. Although, I almost want to give the guy who thought of a use for barbells an extra credit.

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1 hour ago, 1badf350 said:

 Looks to me like it’s just a bunch of stuff people got hung up on the pier and broke their line.

Yes trash in our oceans is a problem however, they seem to be sensationalizing a particular non-issue.

Would be nice to have a link or cite where that writing came from

 

Jennettes pier in Nags Head NC has divers remove all that stuff about every two years. Two divers to do the whole 1000 foot pier. 

 

So if it’s attached to a pier, it’s a non issue? Can’t agree you with there, the risk of marine life entanglement is obviously still there.

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1 hour ago, C.Robin said:

 

So if it’s attached to a pier, it’s a non issue? Can’t agree you with there, the risk of marine life entanglement is obviously still there.

Frankly I don’t care if you agree or not. 

My point being that the article headline would give the impression that what these divers collected looked like a New Jersey landfill when in fact it appears to be mostly fishing sinkers and misc gear related to normal fishing pier operations. They did not collect 1600 pounds of plastic six pack rings and Wal Mart bags. 

 

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4 hours ago, Captain Ahab said:

So people traveled around the world to pick up 2.5lbs of trash each?????

 

The could have picked up more outside the airport terminal

 

 

The point isn’t the amount in pounds per person that was removed.  The story is about a diverse set of humans from  around the planet cooperating to address global problem.  

 

Because they got more divers to participate than ever before in history, the earned a Guinness World Record.  That led to press coverage from every major news outlet globally.  

 

The big win had nothing to do with the total amount of trash removed, or trash per person.   It was about raising awareness to marine pollution and starting conversations.  Like this one.

 

 

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Go on line to "4 Oceans.com" it's a group of young people who have set up a plastics clean up operation in the Pacific oceans from Figi to Hawaii. They are using the recycled plastics to make bracelets and fund the projects. A large goup of small boats with divers are out every day picking up the junk.   I bgt a bunch of bracelets for my Grandaughters,which come with a story of the project.  The kids love it and it is doing a needed job.

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3 hours ago, 1badf350 said:

Frankly I don’t care if you agree or not. 

My point being that the article headline would give the impression that what these divers collected looked like a New Jersey landfill when in fact it appears to be mostly fishing sinkers and misc gear related to normal fishing pier operations. They did not collect 1600 pounds of plastic six pack rings and Wal Mart bags. 

 

They collected a lot of different things, not just fishing gear.   The article would have been better if Tim S didn’t edited it ?   He took out the pictures ,  I did put in the one with the weights ? 

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