lonellr

Accoya Wood

Rate this topic

10 posts in this topic

My buddy sent me a box of accoya wood to turn and it turned and sanded great. I made a peanut danny, sandeel, and fast sinking needle out of if for my first batch. I've included a video on it for everyone to check out if you want. If you can get your hands on it, give it a try. Anyone have any experience with it?

IMG_1460.JPG.3a0dd73ebb0b7478501c9e6d76390998.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Verrrry interesting. Low water absorption and minimal swell and shrink. Seems ideal for plug making. What natural wood would you compare the weight and hardness to? I haven't found anything about what they use as a base wood. Any idea what it is?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Kent I said:

Verrrry interesting. Low water absorption and minimal swell and shrink. Seems ideal for plug making. What natural wood would you compare the weight and hardness to? I haven't found anything about what they use as a base wood. Any idea what it is?

I couldn't find the base wood either. I compare the weight to clear pine, but turning and sanding it is like cedar. It has a elmer's glue smell when turning, but it cuts awesome. I'm definitely a big fan and will check locally to purchase more. I know it is on the pricey side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After a little more poking around I discovered that the base material is mostly radiata pine and it costs around $7-$8 a board foot, which is pretty

much in line with most of the cedars. Haven't found a local source yet, but if it comes into common use, I expect a lot of scrap will become available. There's an interesting short article about it on the Green Building Advisor website.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 mins ago, Kent I said:

After a little more poking around I discovered that the base material is mostly radiata pine and it costs around $7-$8 a board foot, which is pretty

much in line with most of the cedars. Haven't found a local source yet, but if it comes into common use, I expect a lot of scrap will become available. There's an interesting short article about it on the Green Building Advisor website.

There's a lumber yard in Doswell, VA that has it, which is about an hour away from me so I will give them a call sometime soon. I just read the article you mentioned and it said the Lowe's is interested. That would be great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, onthefly said:

you might want to wear a mask when sanding and turning we don't know how toxic the process has made the wood 

I definitely wear a mask when turning any wood, but before I turned them I made sure:

 

"Accoya® wood is non-toxic and 100% recyclable. ... Accoya is made from legally harvested wood from well managed sustainable sources including FSC®, PEFCTM and other regionally certified woods. The Accoya wood manufacturing process is non-toxic and adds nothing to the wood that does not already naturally occur in it."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

2 hours ago, lonellr said:

I definitely wear a mask when turning any wood, but before I turned them I made sure:

 

"Accoya® wood is non-toxic and 100% recyclable. ... Accoya is made from legally harvested wood from well managed sustainable sources including FSC®, PEFCTM and other regionally certified woods. The Accoya wood manufacturing process is non-toxic and adds nothing to the wood that does not already naturally occur in it."

 

 

Here is the chemical used to treat the wood

 

Since the beginning of the 20th century, acetylation of wood was researched as a method to upgrade the durability of wood in resistance against rotting processes and molds. Secondary benefits include the improvement of dimensional stability, improved surface hardness, and no decrease in mechanical properties due to the treatment.

The physical properties of any material are determined by its chemical structure. Wood contains an abundance of chemical groups called "free hydroxyls". Free hydroxyl groups adsorb and release water according to changes in the climatic conditions to which the wood is exposed. This is an explanation as to why wood swells and shrinks. It is also believed that the digestion of wood by enzymes initiates at the free hydroxyl sites – which is one of the principal reasons why wood is prone to decay.

Acetylation changes the free hydroxyls within the wood into acetyl groups. This is done by reacting the wood with acetic anhydride, which comes from acetic acid (known as vinegar when in its dilute form). When the free hydroxyl group is transformed to an acetyl group, the ability of the wood to absorb water is greatly reduced, rendering the wood more dimensionally stable and, because it is no longer digestible, extremely durable.

In 2007, Titan Wood, a London-based company, with production facilities in The Netherlands, achieved cost-effective commercialization and began large-scale production of acetylated wood under the trade name "Accoya".

 

 

Safety[edit]

Acetic anhydride is an irritant and combustible liquid. Because of its reactivity toward water, alcohol foam or carbon dioxide are preferred for fire suppression.[21] The vapour of acetic anhydride is harmful.[22]

 

 

The above is in the chemicals pure state. Not sure if sanding the wood would release any harmful chemicals . According to the manufacture its safe. Just dont eat it. :)

Edited by mmanolis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 mins ago, mmanolis said:

 

 

Here is the chemical used to treat the wood

 

Since the beginning of the 20th century, acetylation of wood was researched as a method to upgrade the durability of wood in resistance against rotting processes and molds. Secondary benefits include the improvement of dimensional stability, improved surface hardness, and no decrease in mechanical properties due to the treatment.

The physical properties of any material are determined by its chemical structure. Wood contains an abundance of chemical groups called "free hydroxyls". Free hydroxyl groups adsorb and release water according to changes in the climatic conditions to which the wood is exposed. This is an explanation as to why wood swells and shrinks. It is also believed that the digestion of wood by enzymes initiates at the free hydroxyl sites – which is one of the principal reasons why wood is prone to decay.

Acetylation changes the free hydroxyls within the wood into acetyl groups. This is done by reacting the wood with acetic anhydride, which comes from acetic acid (known as vinegar when in its dilute form). When the free hydroxyl group is transformed to an acetyl group, the ability of the wood to absorb water is greatly reduced, rendering the wood more dimensionally stable and, because it is no longer digestible, extremely durable.

In 2007, Titan Wood, a London-based company, with production facilities in The Netherlands, achieved cost-effective commercialization and began large-scale production of acetylated wood under the trade name "Accoya".

That's the elmer's glue smell I'm smelling. It's acetic anhydride or super strong vinegar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.