Nbourque

Beaches...

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10 hours ago, Nbourque said:

Anyone gettin any fish out front? I went this past Monday. A few light taps but no fish to speak of. 

One small fish off the beach the other morning and a few more small bumps, floating sand worms about an hour before and after high tide

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Been doin' real good on certain beaches with large flats. Lots of small sand eels and crabs for bait. Fly fishing I've been averaging 20 to 30 fish a tide. Most schoolies but a few over thirty inches. They're keying on the sandeels so you conventional guys should add a small (two inch) black fly as a dropper.

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On 6/14/2019 at 5:24 PM, Mainiac said:

Been doin' real good on certain beaches with large flats. Lots of small sand eels and crabs for bait. Fly fishing I've been averaging 20 to 30 fish a tide. Most schoolies but a few over thirty inches. They're keying on the sandeels so you conventional guys should add a small (two inch) black fly as a dropper.

 

On 6/14/2019 at 5:24 PM, Mainiac said:

Been doin' real good on certain beaches with large flats. Lots of small sand eels and crabs for bait. Fly fishing I've been averaging 20 to 30 fish a tide. Most schoolies but a few over thirty inches. They're keying on the sandeels so you conventional guys should add a small (two inch) black fly as a dropper.

Same up here    Lack of bigger bait and abundance of small bait and Brit herring, though the bigger fish that are around will still happily take a Mack.  It’s been a very tough yet fun hunt targeting bigger fish the last two weeks

 

our boat took a statistical anomaly big fish this weekend (36” heavy fat fish).  With mycobacterium as a bonus 

 

 

Keep at it  

 

have fun out there 

 

Jim

 

 

Edited by jimbighead

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On 6/19/2019 at 5:47 AM, stripedbassking said:

Pretty slow but they’re there, just not the numbers of big fish we hope for yet

I agree, haven’t done much off the beaches yet at all. Got a nice 25-26” last night and a bunch of hits but nothing else to show for it. Hoping the wave of big fish don’t bypass the beaches and head offshore chasing Mack’s or bunker, been about par for the course at the docks with the usual smattering of small to mid-20 sized fish pretty consistently 

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On 6/16/2019 at 6:51 PM, jimbighead said:

 

Same up here    Lack of bigger bait and abundance of small bait and Brit herring, though the bigger fish that are around will still happily take a Mack.  It’s been a very tough yet fun hunt targeting bigger fish the last two weeks

 

our boat took a statistical anomaly big fish this weekend (36” heavy fat fish).  With mycobacterium as a bonus 

 

 

Keep at it  

 

have fun out there 

 

Jim

 

 

Had to look up mycobacterium.... was that a Siri rewrite?  If not, what is it?  Google definitions seems less than savory. 

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As Lili Von Shtupp said, "It's twue, it's twue!!"

 

Mycobacteriosis is a bacterial disease in which striped bass (rockfish) may be disfigured as a result of skin ulcers and internal lesions. The bass may also be skinny or in extremely poor condition due to the chronic nature of this wasting disease. Stripers are a highly prized target species for both recreational anglers and commercial fishermen. As such, the economic impact of diseased and devalued fish could be significant. In addition, some of the mycobacteria that commonly infect fishes can cause infections in people and therefore are a human health concern. The total extent to which the disease is occurring along the Eastern seaboard is unknown but the disease has been reported from stripers taken from North Carolina to New York. During 1998-99, skin ulcers attributed to mycobacterial infection were observed in up to 28% of the striped bass from some Virginia tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Data obtained during 2002—2003 from fish harvested in Virginia and Maryland waters indicated that, at least in some areas, over 80% of striped bass may be infected with the mycobacteria that are associated with the disease. Given the persistence over the last 8 years of this mycobacteriosis outbreak, this does not appear to be a short-term problem.

 

dermal_lesions.jpg

 

I've caught 2 diseased fish here in Maine, on in 2017 that was pretty involved, but no nearly the scene above, and one this year that had 1 or 2 leisions on it's sides, and damage to the lower part of its tail.

Edited by Roccus7

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On 6/21/2019 at 7:48 AM, Roccus7 said:

As Lili Von Shtupp said, "It's twue, it's twue!!"

 

Mycobacteriosis is a bacterial disease in which striped bass (rockfish) may be disfigured as a result of skin ulcers and internal lesions. The bass may also be skinny or in extremely poor condition due to the chronic nature of this wasting disease. Stripers are a highly prized target species for both recreational anglers and commercial fishermen. As such, the economic impact of diseased and devalued fish could be significant. In addition, some of the mycobacteria that commonly infect fishes can cause infections in people and therefore are a human health concern. The total extent to which the disease is occurring along the Eastern seaboard is unknown but the disease has been reported from stripers taken from North Carolina to New York. During 1998-99, skin ulcers attributed to mycobacterial infection were observed in up to 28% of the striped bass from some Virginia tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Data obtained during 2002—2003 from fish harvested in Virginia and Maryland waters indicated that, at least in some areas, over 80% of striped bass may be infected with the mycobacteria that are associated with the disease. Given the persistence over the last 8 years of this mycobacteriosis outbreak, this does not appear to be a short-term problem.

 

dermal_lesions.jpg

 

I've caught 2 diseased fish here in Maine, on in 2017 that was pretty involved, but no nearly the scene above, and one this year that had 1 or 2 leisions on it's sides, and damage to the lower part of its tail.

Wow, that’s crazy! Is it painful to the fish? Surprising it’s still swimming looking like that.

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