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Fly line question

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Cape

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I recently moved to southwest Florida. I recently switched my 8wt line to a tropical/bonefish line on the advice of a casting instructor. I have several other lines for various rods. My questions is do these lines serve a purpose in my current climate or should I replace them with a bonefish line? For example, I have the following lines I used up north:

All lines are made by Orvis

4 wt trout line

6wt trout line

8 wt depth charge

8wt striper

10wt all rounder

Edited by Cape
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It may have more to do with the line visibility in the waters where you would be fishing.

I can't imagine a fish not being able to see a dark or fluorescent colored line when fished over a sandy beach or sand bar....

 

That's my $0.02

I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy!
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The issue is the core material and coating not the color (in general).   Heat can cause issues. I doubt you will be using the 4 and 6wt trout lines much in Florida but does not mean you wouldn't head north to GA for some trout fishing at some point.

I would try the other lines on the types of days you are likely to fish.  If they shoot well then keep using them.  Otherwise find substitutes.

 

 

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6 hours ago, Cape said:

I recently moved to southwest Florida. I recently switched my 8wt line to a tropical/bonefish line on the advice of a casting instructor. I have several other lines for various rods. My questions is do these lines serve a purpose in my current climate or should I replace them with a bonefish line? For example, I have the following lines I used up north:

All lines are made by Orvis

4 wt trout line

6wt trout line

8 wt depth charge

8wt striper

10wt all rounder

the material itself becomes very limp and harder to cast because of the warm water conditions hence the cold water (striper, trout) lines are designed for cold water temps.  Some of this is gimicky and its probably not necessary to replace all your lines but test them out and see it they don't perform the way you're used to.  I do feel like it matters more in hot conditions than in cold but i haven't fished more than 1 or 2 days in tropical climates so I'm not sure.

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14 hours ago, secampb1 said:

the material itself becomes very limp and harder to cast because of the warm water conditions hence the cold water (striper, trout) lines are designed for cold water temps.  Some of this is gimicky and its probably not necessary to replace all your lines but test them out and see it they don't perform the way you're used to.  I do feel like it matters more in hot conditions than in cold but i haven't fished more than 1 or 2 days in tropical climates so I'm not sure.

Yes, that is what I was told.

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