bobber

sea robin infestation

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55 posts in this topic

2 hours ago, HKJonathan said:

I skinned it. You use the head as a grip to ripped the skin off (there are videos on YouTube showing how to do this). I grilled the whole skinless tail. The meat is quite firm so it held together well on the grill. Give it a try. 

That's by far the easiest way to clean them. If you want to you can then take the filets off, but I don't find it necessary. There's only a few rib bones, and the meat falls right off easily. I'm gonna have to try grilling next time. I usually cook them in a pan with butter. They are delicious for sure.

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13 hours ago, bobber said:

not sure if they're everywhere, but they are definitely in LIS and Montauk.  probably Block too.    I'm wondering why there are SOOOO many this year.  like, maybe theres an imbalance in the ecological world that causing them to probagate so much.  I even saw a YT video where a guy was sight fishing them from the beach.....

 

 

 

whaddya think???

I haven't encountered more than usual in the LIS, nowhere as bad as two years ago. THAT was an invasion. 30 sea robins in an hour without trying. This year I've noted less, but MUCH larger Robin's. I dont mind though, I wish they grew to 30lbs, that would be fun.

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Seems like much less of them this year to me, I've caught a few fluke but no robins. I was catching them one after the other this time last year.

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I clocked a sea robin in MTK  on a trip. It was delicious. They were hitting plugs it was a striper sea robin bite so i decided to keep one. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Who knows. We might have sea robbin charters in the future. :)

When you make fish soup with sea robbin, taste is very similar to fugu ( poisonous blow fish).

Edited by ksong

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11 hours ago, ksong said:

 

 

Wow.....that was prepared amazingly well and cooked to perfection.  If this was marketed more like this, we might have a limit on searobins in the future.  lolz.

 

 

 

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13 hours ago, Gundalba said:

Sea Robin is sushi/sashimi delicacy.

Tastes like chicken

 

13 hours ago, bobber said:

not sure if they're everywhere, but they are definitely in LIS and Montauk.  probably Block too.

We chased them all out of NJ

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2 hours ago, ksong said:

Who knows. We might have sea robbin charters in the future. :)

When you make fish soup with sea robbin, taste is very similar to fugu ( poisonous blow fish).

Sure they may be the only fish in the sound....

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Anyone fishing the Forks at night get them? During day light they are a constant problem but can't remember ever dealing with them that much after dark.

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10 hours ago, ksong said:

Those warms are extremely rare and I believe they give pain as they penetrate the stomach wall. But they can not survive in human body.

Like in Japan, millions of people in Korea eat sashimi and we rarely hear about warm problem from saltwater fish. Squid sometimes have some kind of warms which give pain when swallowed. You can eat fresh squid sashimi just get rid of internal part. 

Anything that requires surgery to remove most people don't voluntarily mess with.

 

From the CDC:

 

Quote

 

What are the signs and symptoms?

The signs and symptoms of anisakiasis are abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distention, diarrhea, blood and mucus in stool, and mild fever. Allergic reactions with rash and itching, and infrequently, anaphylaxis, can also occur.

How can I prevent anisakiasis?

Do not eat raw or undercooked fish or squid.

The FDA recommends the following for seafood preparation or storage to kill parasites.

  • Cooking (Seafood in General)
    • Cook seafood adequately (to an internal temperature of at least 145° F [~63° C]).
  • Freezing (Fish)
    • At -4°F (-20°C) or below for 7 days (total time), or
    • At -31°F (-35°C) or below until solid, and storing at -31°F (-35°C) or below for 15 hours, or
    • At -31°F (-35°C) or below until solid and storing at -4°F (-20°C) or below for 24 hours.

More on: Fight BAC: Safe Food HandlingExternal

What is the treatment?

The treatment for anisakiasis may require removal of the worm from the body by endoscopy or surgery.

 

 

 

This study estimates 8000 clinical cases a year in Spain alone.  https://www.nature.com/articles/srep43699 

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I used to eat them as a kid more than 60 years ago and they were excellent.  Then I became a fish snob.  I think I will start eating them again.  Fish is fish.

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1 hour ago, rollrocks said:

Anyone fishing the Forks at night get them? During day light they are a constant problem but can't remember ever dealing with them that much after dark.

I see them chasing bait and popping the surface at night in the shallows (sub 2 feet deep) but I've never caught one at night come to think of it. 

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When I was fishing the peconic last month, packs of 5-6 were following my bucktail all the way to my feet. I was messing around with them, bobbing the bucktail on the surface a few feet from me while they were going crazy for it.

 

Haven’t encountered many on the western south shore of LI yet.

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59 mins ago, C.Robin said:

When I was fishing the peconic last month, packs of 5-6 were following my bucktail all the way to my feet. I was messing around with them, bobbing the bucktail on the surface a few feet from me while they were going crazy for it.

 

Haven’t encountered many on the western south shore of LI yet.

Jeez man, where your obvious avatar pic??? Here's a cool one:

?format=750w

 

 

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