bobber

sea robin infestation

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Wow, cool video. That knife looks terrifyingly sharp! I wonder why he pitched the water he poached the fish in when he made the soup rather than poach it in the stock he put in later?

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1 hour ago, gellfex said:

:worms: 

 

Literally. I'd never eat any local fish raw or ceviche that wasn't frozen a week first.  Several years ago Africaster posted some pics of a robin full of Anisakis worms! It's not limited to robins, any inshore fish can have them. Google it, probably won't kill you but you'll want to die.

Good point. Free first but defrost carefully. Better safe than sorry.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

1 hour ago, ksong said:

 

That's good for food court fish work but here is a better one.:clap: My favorite chef with proper knife skill and most of the time (on Youtv) he uses his Mrs. 50 yrs old regular kitchen knife to show how you can do the same at home. One of the masters, I would say.

 

Edited by Gundalba

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38 mins ago, gellfex said:

Wow, cool video. That knife looks terrifyingly sharp! I wonder why he pitched the water he poached the fish in when he made the soup rather than poach it in the stock he put in later?

Usually couple of reasons to my knowledge.

Most often, to improve the taste but it also make it easier/better to remove the slime or small scale. i.e. eels.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Those warms are extremely rare and I believe they give pain as they penetrate the stomach wall. But they can not survive in human body.

Like in Japan, millions of people in Korea eat sashimi and we rarely hear about warm problem from saltwater fish. Squid sometimes have some kind of warms which give pain when swallowed. You can eat fresh squid sashimi just get rid of internal part. 

Edited by ksong

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7 hours ago, gellfex said:

 a Chinese dude literally filling a 5 gal bucket with ______________________.

 

Ive seen that too.  

 

6 hours ago, Fishing-Addict said:

Too bad the bluefish and stripers are not this abundant just wish there where 10+ pound sea robins so they can actually put up somewhat of a fight.

It isnt uncommon for people to use a lighter rod for schoolies and snapper blues.  I use a much lighter rod when targeting panfish & trout.   

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8 hours ago, gellfex said:

How did you prep it, head on or just the tail? Did the skin get crispy like pork rind? That skin is amazingly tough, makes great fluke strips.

I skinned it. You use the head as a grip to ripped the skin off (there are videos on YouTube showing how to do this). I grilled the whole skinless tail. The meat is quite firm so it held together well on the grill. Give it a try. 

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11 hours ago, bobber said:

not sure if they're everywhere, but they are definitely in LIS and Montauk.  probably Block too.    I'm wondering why there are SOOOO many this year.  like, maybe theres an imbalance in the ecological world that causing them to probagate so much.  I even saw a YT video where a guy was sight fishing them from the beach.....

 

 

 

whaddya think???

Sea robins have been real thick on the south shore for the last 5-6 years that I've paid attention to them. LIS is loaded too. I agree with everyone else here; sea robins are not bad eating at all, and we should definitely take a few to cull. It's not as jet white meat as fluke or sea bass, but is plenty good eating. Aside from the oriental nations, every Mediterranean country (Spain, France, Italy, Greece, etc) eat them a lot. Last I checked they all know how to cook pretty darn well!

 

Big ones you can fillet, smaller ones can be filleted too but are good either grilled whole or used in soup, like a bouillabaisse. 

 

I have sight fished for them in LIS on flats with real light tackle and they are a blast. Sea robins are a damn nuisance while targeting fluke, but we should be happy that they're sea robins and not dogfish or skates that are in numbers like this. (no offense to the shark/ray family!).

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I am an old fart and fished most of my life and I have never seen so many sea robins. I fish between the forks and shinny most of the time and there are days you can't get a bait to the bottom without the robins all over it. My surf fishing along the sound has the same results, a robin on every cast.

I have tried eating and it may be mental but they are not like fluke or sea bass.

They make good bait.

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Tried sea robins for the first time last year and they are pretty tasty.  When you fillet them, you realize how much of the fish is the head.. and as everyone else said, great strips for fluke bait as well.

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