finefish

Worst Start In Years

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Even night fishing is slow from shore lately, at least for bigger fish. Sorry no yaks for me ! 

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6 hours ago, Captain Tuttle said:

The water is a lot warmer.  It has been my experience that the big fish go deep during the day, but you can intercept them in early a.m.   If I was shorebound, I'd fish at night.  Or buy a kayak.

amazing example was yesterday off a famous island in RI, we fished all over it during the morning around 6am to 10am and all we could get on eels were giant sea bass in 40-60ft of water. We ended up calling it quits and headed to the east grounds and a little bit south to troll for blues to use as bait for this weekend, we found some gorillias and in the process we got 15 stripers all around 40-47 inches. We let them all go because we were well over the eez line in 90-120feet of water. I have never came across them over there before, we were trolling umbrella rigs.

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1 hour ago, canalsharpie said:

amazing example was yesterday off a famous island in RI, we fished all over it during the morning around 6am to 10am and all we could get on eels were giant sea bass in 40-60ft of water. We ended up calling it quits and headed to the east grounds and a little bit south to troll for blues to use as bait for this weekend, we found some gorillias and in the process we got 15 stripers all around 40-47 inches. We let them all go because we were well over the eez line in 90-120feet of water. I have never came across them over there before, we were trolling umbrella rigs.

On their new detour route around the cape seals? 

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48 mins ago, alpha baiter said:

On their new detour route around the cape seals? 

could of just been from the insane heat we had, the water around the island was reading 68 at the time we were fishing and they prefer lower. We have been killing it at night

Edited by canalsharpie

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10 mins ago, canalsharpie said:

could of just been from the insane heat we had, the water around the island was reading 68 at the time we were fishing and they prefer lower. We have been killing it at night

True

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37 mins ago, canalsharpie said:

could of just been from the insane heat we had, the water around the island was reading 68 at the time we were fishing and they prefer lower. We have been killing it at night

The temperature the present water has been about 70 degrees in the Cape Cod Bay bay , yet the water in the other bay is a little lower during the day light hours, however the temperature is a little lower at night and perhaps accounts for the activity being observed in the other bay. Are we seeing the effects of warming of the oceans? More seals, more great whites along our coast line of late makes a point to begin a conversations around what are the small herd of seals doing of Town neck Beach and In Old harbor . Are they looking to set up a rookery and what will that do to future fishing in and around the canal . Especially where many of the locally imprinted fish have been removed over the past several years  in numbers large enough to have some effect long term before they recover if they can. Once it was a lack of bait, now that is no longer the case as we have ample mackerel and pogies swimming our waters. To many fishing for such an area surely will continue to takes its toll. The mysteries of the oceans are not being revealed with enough information that makes any sense to be able to analyze and make good predictions for the future other then it continues to look bleak going forward in some parts of the striped bass normal living areas they once thrived in.  

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2 hours ago, Angler #1 said:

The temperature the present water has been about 70 degrees in the Cape Cod Bay bay , yet the water in the other bay is a little lower during the day light hours, however the temperature is a little lower at night and perhaps accounts for the activity being observed in the other bay. Are we seeing the effects of warming of the oceans? More seals, more great whites along our coast line of late makes a point to begin a conversations around what are the small herd of seals doing of Town neck Beach and In Old harbor . Are they looking to set up a rookery and what will that do to future fishing in and around the canal . Especially where many of the locally imprinted fish have been removed over the past several years  in numbers large enough to have some effect long term before they recover if they can. Once it was a lack of bait, now that is no longer the case as we have ample mackerel and pogies swimming our waters. To many fishing for such an area surely will continue to takes its toll. The mysteries of the oceans are not being revealed with enough information that makes any sense to be able to analyze and make good predictions for the future other then it continues to look bleak going forward in some parts of the striped bass normal living areas they once thrived in.  

Great whites and seals both prefer cold water so I don't think water warming would cause a increase. If the water has warmed (which is debatable it's out of the normal range of it's temperature ebs and flows) it's marginal. I think if warmer water was the cause we would see closer species moving north .......fluke in Boston , red drum in NY, etc. White sharks have been here before when the seals were here after they were killed off the sharks diminished. Seals are back and the sharks followed. That's my take anyway. And I think  the seals are the biggest problem to the local fish where seal populations exploded. They average eating 30-50 pounds of fish PER DAY multiply that by what 30,000 seals on the cape and that's a big number. Are fish smart enough to alter migration patterns when 30,000 hungry mouths stand in their way? 

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13 hours ago, alpha baiter said:

Great whites and seals both prefer cold water so I don't think water warming would cause a increase. If the water has warmed (which is debatable it's out of the normal range of it's temperature ebs and flows) it's marginal. I think if warmer water was the cause we would see closer species moving north .......fluke in Boston , red drum in NY, etc. White sharks have been here before when the seals were here after they were killed off the sharks diminished. Seals are back and the sharks followed. That's my take anyway. And I think  the seals are the biggest problem to the local fish where seal populations exploded. They average eating 30-50 pounds of fish PER DAY multiply that by what 30,000 seals on the cape and that's a big number. Are fish smart enough to alter migration patterns when 30,000 hungry mouths stand in their way? 

You make some great points in regards to the amount of food seals need each day, however the optima water temperature according to the research for great whites is 54 to 75 degrees , So I would place the waters in and around Cape Cod As being well suited for them at this time.  

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Ive read those same numbers the biologist have ciculated too. 30-50lbs of fish daily. I don't know if I buy it. When you do the numbers, they don't compute.

 

Lets say on the low end we have 30,000 seals (some biologists say it's closer to 50,000). Each seal eats 30-50lbs of fish daily. That's 900,000-1,500,000lbs of fish daily! Multiple that by 7 days a week, then 365 days a year. The numbers are staggering. Seemingly unachievable.

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4 mins ago, bob_G said:

Ive read those same numbers the biologist have ciculated too. 30-50lbs of fish daily. I don't know if I buy it. When you do the numbers, they don't compute.

 

Lets say on the low end we have 30,000 seals (some biologists say it's closer to 50,000). Each seal eats 30-50lbs of fish daily. That's 900,000-1,500,000lbs of fish daily! Multiple that by 7 days a week, then 365 days a year. The numbers are staggering. Seemingly unachievable.

Agreed

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Posted (edited) · Report post

2 hours ago, Angler #1 said:

You make some great points in regards to the amount of food seals need each day, however the optima water temperature according to the research for great whites is 54 to 75 degrees , So I would place the waters in and around Cape Cod As being well suited for them at this time.  

I agree 100% the waters are suited for them.(and always have been) I was disputing that oceans have warmed significantly enough (if at all) to cause a species migration shift. Seals are why the sharks are here not water temp changes was my point.

Edited by alpha baiter

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Posted (edited) · Report post

2 hours ago, bob_G said:

Ive read those same numbers the biologist have ciculated too. 30-50lbs of fish daily. I don't know if I buy it. When you do the numbers, they don't compute.

 

Lets say on the low end we have 30,000 seals (some biologists say it's closer to 50,000). Each seal eats 30-50lbs of fish daily. That's 900,000-1,500,000lbs of fish daily! Multiple that by 7 days a week, then 365 days a year. The numbers are staggering. Seemingly unachievable.

Why don't you believe it? They're a big animal. Cut the number in half then and your still looking at 450,000 to 750,000 pounds of fish a day. Bob no disrespect here at all but do you have any references to why you think they don't eat that much or is it just a gut feeling lol no pun intended. I think the seals are a bigger problem for the cape fishery than all the poachers you could ever find. 

 

For the record I have no idea how much a seal eats but have seen these figures in almost every source I find. That's why I was wondering if there's other info available. However much it is ..it's a lot

Edited by alpha baiter

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1 hour ago, alpha baiter said:

Why don't you believe it? They're a big animal. Cut the number in half then and your still looking at 450,000 to 750,000 pounds of fish a day. Bob no disrespect here at all but do you have any references to why you think they don't eat that much or is it just a gut feeling lol no pun intended. I think the seals are a bigger problem for the cape fishery than all the poachers you could ever find. 

 

For the record I have no idea how much a seal eats but have seen these figures in almost every source I find. That's why I was wondering if there's other info available. However much it is ..it's a lot

30,000 seals eat 150lbs daily. That equates to 547,500,000 annually! Over a half a billion lbs. How many pounds of seafood was landed in New Bedford last year?

I don't buy those. :squid:

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20 mins ago, bob_G said:

30,000 seals eat 150lbs daily. That equates to 547,500,000 annually! Over a half a billion lbs. How many pounds of seafood was landed in New Bedford last year?

I don't buy those. :squid:

From what I've read, the average adult grey seal can weigh between 500-850lbs and they eat between 4-6% of their body weight daily ... so on the order of 25-40lbs of fish/day, ~12K lbs/year/seal.  It is a very big number.  

Edited by Northshore Bob

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Even if the seals eat only 5 to 10 pounds of meat a day it still adds up to an insane amount of dead fish.  I think that the seals are a much bigger problem than anyone realizes. I wonder if fisheries managers take this into account. 

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