Crozzbow

North of Portland (2019)

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Still fishing, but not much to report.  I seem to be continuing my pattern of 2 skunks followed by one or two fish and then 2 more skunks.  Average size has been decent for the ones I’ve caught, I guess the skunks are just the price of trying new spots and moving around a lot in search of bigger fish. 

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Going back to school this fall has put me out of business in the fishing department as far as the salty stuff is concerned. Targeting smallmouth in the past week has been a refreshing change of pace. I do plan to visit my home waters one more time in the next few weeks and hope to see at least one more striped-guy in return for my effort. I have had good luck in a few spots until mid October just hoping this year stays true to that pattern.. Thanks for all the reports fellas and happy fishing!

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I'm going to give it a shot tonight out on my kayak. I'm not really looking forward to the fact that it will get chilly and dark shortly after I get on the water after work, but weekends have been tough lately so it is what it is. Hopefully being night time I'll at least get a shot at a larger fish. The question is, mouth of the river or back bay? 

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Last two ventures out got into a decent bite. A dozen or so sporty bassies each night in the mid 20’s-27.  Nothing til last light and beyond and only about 1 hr of action at the prime segment of the tide where the current and water flow get swift enough to stir things up enough, the bite putters out after that.  Seeing slender 2-4 inch baitfish in the shallows while looking with around with my headlamp.  Bucktails with a boot tail trailer, swim shads with  big boot tail to move water around and needlefish have taken all them lately.  Hope this helps.  Good luck

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Nothing too interesting to report from last night. Neither of the local bait shops had sand worms and the one that sells eels was all out, so I decided to try something different.

 

I headed out front from my protected launch near the river mouth and caught a few small schoolies on t&w (using Gulp) on the way out. While I still had light, I filled my livewell with about a half dozen mackerel and drifted back in to the harbor until it got dark. I thought I marked a bunch of schoolies off the end of a yacht in the harbor that had it's underwater lights on, but the marks weren't very solid. I've found stripers in this spot before, hitting the bait on top in the illuminated water, so I tossed a small soft plastic down to imitate the tiny bait that have been around. After jigging a few times I hooked up. There was some weight on the line but it wasn't fighting too hard. It turned out to be a foul-hooked harbor pollock, so I guess that was what the marks were. Since I had my sabiki, I dropped it down a few times to confirm my suspicion and caught several more more on each drop. I threw a popper for a few casts just for the hell of it and tried some larger soft plastics to see if there were bass among them to no avail. I've never caught pollock so far into the harbor, so I was surprised and a little disappointed there didn't appear to be any bass.

 

As I headed back towards some other areas near my launch I drifted some of the smaller macks. It was dark and I wasn't expecting much. There were some hits, but likely smaller bass. By the time I got to some other areas I wanted to fish the current had slowed down considerably. I had a few fish marks but nothing was biting. Maybe this is why people don't typically liveline mackerel at night? I ran the t&w a bit more and threw some plastics, but with the lack of current, dropping temps and late hour, I decided to call it a night. I just can't do the all-night thing during the work week, so hopefully next time I'll have some eels and a better tide.

 

Oh, and I hope crozzbow doesn't mind a not-north of Portland report in his thread. :wave:

Edited by drmevo

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5 hours ago, drmevo said:

Oh, and I hope crozzbow doesn't mind a not-north of Portland report in his thread. :wave:

Actually, I would like to see more of that type of play by play report in the N-O-P thread. Keep them coming.

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Still plugging away north of Portland. Weeds have continued to be an issue in my usual spots. A bit hit and miss with big lull times followed by big bust ups. Last night was a complete dud until last light then all hell broke loose. Great topwater action. All clone fish thought, still insane aerial displays. Bumed I can't troll plugs as action this time of the year can be really fun with savage strikes.

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i'd like to thank Crossbow,for taking the time to show me around one of his haunts.you guys in Maine have a very special place to fish,thanks again Steve if I can ever do the same for you on the Cape just let me know

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This morning I managed to wrangle a couple of hours of kayak time on one of my better striped bass "honey holes" for this time of year.  With my arm / elbow feeling much better I decided to take out one of my paddle propelled yaks.  I chose my Viking kayak for today's transport because I find it to be the most stable, maneuverable, and quick on the water kayak I own.

 

I launched the kayak at approximately 9:30 am and immediately ran into a bunch of free floating saltwater vegetation ( sea weed, eel grass etc.) That crap was just thick enough to ruin any efforts to troll my tube and worm rigs and I didn't have the right stuff on board to try trolling with the rod tips under water. 

I was ready to call it a day without even attempting to fish when I realized that there was a lot of surface activity taking place further off shore than I usually fish. It only took a few minutes of watching that commotion before I was paddling out there at well over trolling speed. 

 

As I closed in on the surface activity, I noticed that there was a lot less free floating vegetation in this area. That immediately had me lowering the tube and worm rigs into the seven foot water depth shown on my fish finder.  It only took a couple more strokes of the paddle before I hooked into my first and my second fish at the same time. I had doubled up and both fish were taking line off the reels at a faster rate than I was comfortable with. I cranked down the drags on both reels then started bringing in the fish in a little bit at a time. It took approximately 15 minutes before I could bring both fish to the kayak and release them.  

 

During that time the tidal currents had floated the kayak, with me in it, quite a distance away from where my initial encounter with the two fish took place.  I took a quick look around and decided to do another quick paddle to the last know location of the surface activity then troll the tube and worm rigs around that area to see if I could hook into a straggler or two. 

 

That strategy worked rather well in that I caught and released several more fish before I had to quit for the day and dash home in time to honor another commitment the activity coordinator had set up for me.

 

BTW: two of the fish that I refered to above were caught and released when I doubled up for the second time this morning. That battle was even more narley than the first one.

 

 

 

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I am going to be up in the Port Clyde area starting around 9/21 for a week. I'm a total newby on striper fishing, but would love to give it a try. I have a son in law  who can supply me with some surf casting tackle. Anyone have any feedback on whether there are striper that can be caught from shore anywhere in the Port Clyde area? Not that I mind just standing there and casting for a couple of hours :-) But if there were a fish at the end of the line at the end of the day that would be nice too! Any suggestions much appreciated.

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 Hey Tony

 

Roccus7 Is probably more in tune with Port Clyde than I am ....

 

However,  if I was going to hazard a guess I would say that finding any striped bass in that location at this time of year would be few and far in between. You might be better off trying to catch some of the fish (pollock, cod, cunner etc) that typically would be in the process of migrating into the harbors and closer to the shoreline.by this time of year.

Tossing small metal lures or jigs around the local docks (where permitted) or jigs tipped with Gulp curly tail minnows might get you a bite or two.  Don't be shy about asking the natives where the good spots are and the best way to catch the fish that are there.

Crozzbow

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15 hours ago, TonyBlair said:

I am going to be up in the Port Clyde area starting around 9/21 for a week. I'm a total newby on striper fishing, but would love to give it a try. I have a son in law  who can supply me with some surf casting tackle. Anyone have any feedback on whether there are striper that can be caught from shore anywhere in the Port Clyde area? Not that I mind just standing there and casting for a couple of hours :-) But if there were a fish at the end of the line at the end of the day that would be nice too! Any suggestions much appreciated.

If they're are there now, they'll probably be there in a week.  However, I have no "operatives" in that area.  I'm just down the coast a bit and the bass are still around.

 

Besides the normal "collection" like swimming plugs (SP Minnow or Jointed Redfin), you'll need a popper like a Creek Chub Striper Strike size 2500.  However, I have a new "Love of My Life" a 7" Fin-S in Albino White hooked up "Texas" Style with no weight on a 5/0 hook.  The one great thing around these parts is that most folks leave their rods on the boats all rigged up and in plain sight so LOOK around.  If nobody has bass lures/rigs on their rods, that will answer all your questions...

 

Mackerel and harbor pollock will oblige and you don't need anything fancy.  Your fly rod would suffice, although be warned.  If you catch a 1 lb mackerel on a trout fly rod you'll wonder why you ever bothered to catch trout...

Edited by Roccus7

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When I left the house at 4:30 am this morning (Sunday) I looked forward to having one of our out of state SOL members, “l.i.fish.in.vt” (A.K.A. John), joining me on the water for a few hours of striped bass fishing. John and other members of his family spent the weekend in Maine living out of a tent that they had pitched at one of the local campgrounds.

 Aside from the standard tourist activities, John expressed a desire to take his kayak out on the water to observe how tube and worms were used to catch striped bass in mid coast Maine. I volunteered to show him what little I know and invited him to spend some time at one of my more productive striped bass “honey hoes” and troll one of my tube and worm rigs then planned the outing on Saturday.

Unfortunately, Weather and time constraints pushed the outing to this morning for a shorter length of time at one my less productive “honey holes”.

 

When we got to the launch site the sky was starting to get brighter so we took a good look around then launched our kayaks at 6:00 am and took a good look around.

The good news was that was there was plenty of bait fish and striped bass activity on the surface of the water. In addition, almost all the free-floating vegetation that frustrated the heck out of me, during my last visit to this area, appeared to have completely left the area.

The bad news was that enticing striped bass to latch onto tube and worms in this area can be bit more difficult than hooking up with them in the area I first recommended.

Long story short, we fished for three hours and between the two of us we caught and released enough fish to call it a successful morning. From my perspective, it was nice to have a real person, to talk to on the water, who has some of the same interests as me.

FYI: Most of the fish we caught and released would probably measure somewhere between 18 inches to 24 inches in length.

 

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