Crozzbow

North of Portland (2019)

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Heading up to the beautiful Kennebec in 3 1/2 weeks and love hearing about what's happening with you mid coast guys.  We stay at Cox Head and kayak around  from Back River down to the fort and have a great time every year.  Keep after them boys and thanks for the reports. 

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I took another trip to the beach yesterday (Tuesday) morning and was rewarded with three feisty, school sized, striped bass that readily took the 2-inch olive and white clouser minnow that I had been offering to them via my 9wt fly rod. All three fish were caught in bright sunshine and within the last hour of the dropping tide    

Given the large number of seals that were working the area, I was surprised to hook into that many fish. As it was, I was a little concerned about releasing exhausted fish into the waiting jaws of the seals.

So, once the hooks were extracted, I made it a point to quickly resuscitate and release each one of these fish back into the water while verifying they didn’t have any noticeable injuries and could remain upright without help from me.

I’m hoping the arm feels well enough for a tube, worm, and kayak outing for me this weekend. If not, it will probably be back to the beach for me.

Edited by Crozzbow

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Happy to see you back fishing and writing Crozzbow.  After shoulder surgery last May my fishing enjoyment was limited to reading your posts.  I agree with the other posters about PT, it works wonders.  Going up to Boothbay in a couple of weeks and will be looking to test my tube & worm skills on or near the Sheepscott.  

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Not as far north of Portland last evening- solid fish on a chart& white clouser and chart/white/purple hollow fly.  All 20"" plus, one pushing keeper size.

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I spent three fantastic hours this morning catching one quality sized striped bass after another. It started a 5:00 am when I launched the my tried and true Hobie Revolution kayak into the calm water and promptly caught a relatively large striped bass five minutes later. A few minutes after I released that striped bass, I doubled up with two striped bass that were both larger than my first catch.

By the time I finally called it quits I had caught and released 37 feisty striped bass that measured somewhere between 20 and 30 inches. Aside from the double up that I mentioned above, I had to keep it interesting by doubling up two more times.

All the fish that I hooked up with this morning were taken using my standard 15-inch tube and worm rigging that I trolled through shallow water (7ft or less).

What amazed me the most this morning is that while I was steadily catching large fish in bright sunlight, both the fish and the birds were wracking havoc on schools of silvery bait fish that were jumping all around me.

Another thing that sort of amazed me this morning was the helping hands that showed up when I was having a bit of trouble trying to wrestle my kayak back onto my pick-up truck racks. Because, my right arm still hasn’t completely healed and regain all its strength back, I couldn’t lift my kayak over my head while balancing it at the same time. After two failed attempts, I decided to just set on the open tail gate and wait for a good Samaritan came by. I didn’t have to wait long before two very attractive female Samaritans stopped by to offer their assistance.  

While I was somewhat inclined to reject their offer of assistance and wait for a male Samaritan, something inside me said don’t do it. Instead, I just explained to them what I would need from them to get the kayak in the racks. One of them said let’s do it and a few minutes later the kayak was up the rack and safely nestled in its cradle.

After that, we chatted for a few minutes then they both went back to their vehicle to finish wrestling their own two kayaks onto the racks of their Subaru. I offered my help, but they just giggled and waved me off.

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2 hours ago, Crozzbow said:

I spent three fantastic hours this morning catching one quality sized striped bass after another. It started a 5:00 am when I launched the my tried and true Hobie Revolution kayak into the calm water and promptly caught a relatively large striped bass five minutes later. A few minutes after I released that striped bass, I doubled up with two striped bass that were both larger than my first catch.

By the time I finally called it quits I had caught and released 37 feisty striped bass that measured somewhere between 20 and 30 inches. Aside from the double up that I mentioned above, I had to keep it interesting by doubling up two more times.

All the fish that I hooked up with this morning were taken using my standard 15-inch tube and worm rigging that I trolled through shallow water (7ft or less).

What amazed me the most this morning is that while I was steadily catching large fish in bright sunlight, both the fish and the birds were wracking havoc on schools of silvery bait fish that were jumping all around me.

Another thing that sort of amazed me this morning was the helping hands that showed up when I was having a bit of trouble trying to wrestle my kayak back onto my pick-up truck racks. Because, my right arm still hasn’t completely healed and regain all its strength back, I couldn’t lift my kayak over my head while balancing it at the same time. After two failed attempts, I decided to just set on the open tail gate and wait for a good Samaritan came by. I didn’t have to wait long before two very attractive female Samaritans stopped by to offer their assistance.  

While I was somewhat inclined to reject their offer of assistance and wait for a male Samaritan, something inside me said don’t do it. Instead, I just explained to them what I would need from them to get the kayak in the racks. One of them said let’s do it and a few minutes later the kayak was up the rack and safely nestled in its cradle.

After that, we chatted for a few minutes then they both went back to their vehicle to finish wrestling their own two kayaks onto the racks of their Subaru. I offered my help, but they just giggled and waved me off.

Great day OTW

 

glad you are back in the yak!

 

and way to catch and release your final double up in the parking lot :)  

 

good on ya

 

jim 

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18 hours ago, jimbighead said:

Great day OTW

 

glad you are back in the yak!

 

and way to catch and release your final double up in the parking lot :)  

 

good on ya

 

jim 

Yeah!

It might have been a nice catch but, there was no way I was going to take it home to "mother".

 

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42 mins ago, Crozzbow said:

Yeah!

It might have been a nice catch but, there was no way I was going to take it home to "mother".

 

Reminds me of an evening at a company gala when I and a colleague were closely "examining" a young lovely.  His wife flitted past and said, "If you caught it, you wouldn't know what to do with it!"  Almost died laughing...

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34 mins ago, Roccus7 said:

Reminds me of an evening at a company gala when I and a colleague were closely "examining" a young lovely.  His wife flitted past and said, "If you caught it, you wouldn't know what to do with it!"  Almost died laughing...

Leave it to Roccus7

LMFAO and still laughing.

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1 hour ago, Crozzbow said:

Leave it to Roccus7

LMFAO and still laughing.

There are the ones that got away....and the ones we can’t have...  the life of a “fisherman”.   Still laughing...

 

tight lines 

 

jim 

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@Crozzbow - thank you for all of your writing. I spent this past winter obsessively reading through the past few years' worth of posts as I was thinking about buying a kayak.

 

One question about your tube and worm rigging, if you don't mind. I've ordered some rudders online and need to pick up the rest of the bits, but can't quite make out the details in the photo you've posted. Do you go (ring -> wire -> ring -> rudder -> ring -> wire -> swivel)? Or is that mono?

 

Much thanks!

 

 

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6 hours ago, yinzerheader said:

@Crozzbow - thank you for all of your writing. I spent this past winter obsessively reading through the past few years' worth of posts as I was thinking about buying a kayak.

 

One question about your tube and worm rigging, if you don't mind. I've ordered some rudders online and need to pick up the rest of the bits, but can't quite make out the details in the photo you've posted. Do you go (ring -> wire -> ring -> rudder -> ring -> wire -> swivel)? Or is that mono?

 

Much thanks!

 

 

Hey Yinzer

See if this makes any sense to you. If it doesn't let me know.

 

For several years now I've had well above average success, fishing for striped bass with tube and worms that I trolled through ultra skinny water behind a kayak. Over those years I learned that the only way to achieve tube and worm presentations that consistently catch Striped Bass is to become one with the tube. You must practice, practice, then practice some more.

 

Seriously, I believe the reason that my tube and worm rigs work for me, especially in ultra shallow water, is that I have used this methodology for so long that has just became second nature for me to locate the fish and choose the right presentation for trolling my rigs on the outside edges of visible weed lines or just above the top of sunken weed beds or along rock ledges. However, I do avoid trolling around free floating weeds and loose rock piles like the plague.

My rigs are sized to the area and conditions I’m fishing. Since I am primarily fishing in the shallow waters, I  use a 12 to 15 inch long, 1/2 inch outside diameter, translucent red tube (or when nobody is watching a pink tube) that is rigged Carolina Style with a 3/8 ounce bullet weight that rides on a 20 inch length of 20 lb test leader.  I also added snap swivels and a small in-line rudder on my rigs to reduce line twist.

 

If you are using one of those weighted keel type rudders (the ones that come packaged with a lot of the store bought tubes) in shallow water your almost guaranteed to get hung up or pick up weeds no mater what you do.  Note:The rudder I pictured in some of my past year North of Portland threads is no longer available but good substitute plastic rudders can be purchased through Lure Parts Online.commmt.gif?s=d74497e4-4ae0-d847-6234-65391bc9e157&a=p.a&u=653e4b54-9bf1-4e87-b6d1-4b71d2220c5f

 

My rigs are relatively easy to construct. I Start by tying an appropriate sized snap swivel to the end of the 30lb test braid that iI have spooled on my saltwater spinning reel. I then attach the snap swivel to the appropriate attachment point on a small plastic, in-line rudder. From there I tie a 20 inch length of 20lb test mono leader onto the remaining attachment point of the rudder. Next a 3/8 ounce bullet weight (sized for the water I usually fish) is slipped onto the leader with a small plastic bead or two placed in back of it to protect the knot that will tie the snap swivel to the other end of the leader.  Once the snap swivel has been firmly attached to the mono leader it is

attached to the nose of a 15 inch long tube.

 

When I fish deeper water or strong rips, I'll up-size this basic tube rig configuration appropriately.  I.E. longer tubes with larger diameters and heavier bullet weights. etc. 

I try to fish my tubes as close to the bottom as I can without getting snagged or picking up bottom debris although in the shallows the nearness to the bottom isn't that critical. Typically I am trolling my tube rigs somewhere between 10 to 15 feet behind the kayak. The tubes need to be trolled just fast enough to get them to cork screw through the water. Note:.You may need to adjust the curves of the tube to get that real slow roll that drives striped bass crazy.  I usually  troll my tubes approximately 1.5 to 2 mph behind my kayak.

I typically use blood worms with my tube rigs. However, sand worms, clams, Uncle Josh scented pork rind strips, night crawlers, and the Saltwater Gulp products will also work.  It is mostly about getting enough scent in the water behind tube to entice the striped bass into investigating it.

 

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7 hours ago, Crozzbow said:

 

Hey Yinzer

See if this makes any sense to you. If it doesn't let me know.

 

For several years now I've had well above average success, fishing for striped bass with tube and worms that I trolled through ultra skinny water behind a kayak. Over those years I learned that the only way to achieve tube and worm presentations that consistently catch Striped Bass is to become one with the tube. You must practice, practice, then practice some more.

 

Seriously, I believe the reason that my tube and worm rigs work for me, especially in ultra shallow water, is that I have used this methodology for so long that has just became second nature for me to locate the fish and choose the right presentation for trolling my rigs on the outside edges of visible weed lines or just above the top of sunken weed beds or along rock ledges. However, I do avoid trolling around free floating weeds and loose rock piles like the plague.

My rigs are sized to the area and conditions I’m fishing. Since I am primarily fishing in the shallow waters, I  use a 12 to 15 inch long, 1/2 inch outside diameter, translucent red tube (or when nobody is watching a pink tube) that is rigged Carolina Style with a 3/8 ounce bullet weight that rides on a 20 inch length of 20 lb test leader.  I also added snap swivels and a small in-line rudder on my rigs to reduce line twist.

 

If you are using one of those weighted keel type rudders (the ones that come packaged with a lot of the store bought tubes) in shallow water your almost guaranteed to get hung up or pick up weeds no mater what you do.  Note:The rudder I pictured in some of my past year North of Portland threads is no longer available but good substitute plastic rudders can be purchased through Lure Parts Online.commmt.gif?s=d74497e4-4ae0-d847-6234-65391bc9e157&a=p.a&u=653e4b54-9bf1-4e87-b6d1-4b71d2220c5f

 

My rigs are relatively easy to construct. I Start by tying an appropriate sized snap swivel to the end of the 30lb test braid that iI have spooled on my saltwater spinning reel. I then attach the snap swivel to the appropriate attachment point on a small plastic, in-line rudder. From there I tie a 20 inch length of 20lb test mono leader onto the remaining attachment point of the rudder. Next a 3/8 ounce bullet weight (sized for the water I usually fish) is slipped onto the leader with a small plastic bead or two placed in back of it to protect the knot that will tie the snap swivel to the other end of the leader.  Once the snap swivel has been firmly attached to the mono leader it is

attached to the nose of a 15 inch long tube.

 

When I fish deeper water or strong rips, I'll up-size this basic tube rig configuration appropriately.  I.E. longer tubes with larger diameters and heavier bullet weights. etc. 

I try to fish my tubes as close to the bottom as I can without getting snagged or picking up bottom debris although in the shallows the nearness to the bottom isn't that critical. Typically I am trolling my tube rigs somewhere between 10 to 15 feet behind the kayak. The tubes need to be trolled just fast enough to get them to cork screw through the water. Note:.You may need to adjust the curves of the tube to get that real slow roll that drives striped bass crazy.  I usually  troll my tubes approximately 1.5 to 2 mph behind my kayak.

I typically use blood worms with my tube rigs. However, sand worms, clams, Uncle Josh scented pork rind strips, night crawlers, and the Saltwater Gulp products will also work.  It is mostly about getting enough scent in the water behind tube to entice the striped bass into investigating it.

 

Thanks Crozzbow! In the photos you posted through the years it looked like your rudder was rigged - the ones I've ordered are bare plastic. Did you rig them yourself, with wire?

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Fish blitzing tiny herring had me ready to take up golf this AM.  Using a popper, 1 in 20 casts right into feeding fish may elicit a response, but not necessarily a hit.  Tried a Deadly Dick with no luck and finally switched to a small Sebile Magic Swimmer and it was just about a hit a cast, with my first keepah for the season @ 31".  Of course with those small, wire hooks, she broke off one of the hooks on a treble.  

 

 

bass on deck low res.jpg

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