blackdogfish

Let's talk about carbon fiber paddles.

40 posts in this topic

After a recent injury, I am going to get a carbon fiber paddle to reduce stress on my aging body. There's a million different blade shapes, brands, etc.  This is probably not going to be one of those things that I get online. I'll visit a store where I can test paddle. But I'm interested in opinions and experiences and recommendations.

 

I'm on a WS T120... mostly small lake and some saltwater as well.

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If you  have a shoulder injury narrow long blades offer the least resistance when paddling. One of the best ever is the Werner camano  model. It is not cheap but should last a lifetime. Good luck with your decision.  They have size charts to determine your optimal length. They are based on your size  and the kayak width and how high you sit  above the water. A test paddle would be best but most local places by me went out of business.

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33 mins ago, dbjpb said:

If you  have a shoulder injury narrow long blades offer the least resistance when paddling. One of the best ever is the Werner camano  model. It is not cheap but should last a lifetime. Good luck with your decision.  They have size charts to determine your optimal length. They are based on your size  and the kayak width and how high you sit  above the water. A test paddle would be best but most local places by me went out of business.

agreed, you will likely want a low angle stroke as opposed to a high angle- 

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6 hours ago, robmedina said:

agreed, you will likely want a low angle stroke as opposed to a high angle- 

Does that refer both to the method of paddling as well as the shape of the blade?

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Joe, I believe the weight is the lesser issue, what you want to reduce your stress is to paddle with low resistance and high cadence, like being in a low gear on a bike. Try a real short paddle, like 200-220 cm, or one with real thin blades. 

 

As for carbon, I found that the cost of getting below 30 oz is very high for  just a 3-4 more oz. I love my Bending Branches Slice Hybrid Plus, which has a carbon shaft, and 215-230cm telescoping ferrule so you can "change gear". I find I paddle most in the 215 mode, far shorter than many here.

 

Sorry I didn't look you up again to fish when I picked the kid up from UVM a couple weeks ago, we came and left very quickly.

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You can get a carbon aqua bound stingray for about $160 . Weighs  about  28oz . I have  bad shoulders and like low angle paddling to reduce inflammation, the stingray works well for me. 

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16 hours ago, gellfex said:

Joe, I believe the weight is the lesser issue, what you want to reduce your stress is to paddle with low resistance and high cadence, like being in a low gear on a bike. Try a real short paddle, like 200-220 cm, or one with real thin blades. 

 

As for carbon, I found that the cost of getting below 30 oz is very high for  just a 3-4 more oz. I love my Bending Branches Slice Hybrid Plus, which has a carbon shaft, and 215-230cm telescoping ferrule so you can "change gear". I find I paddle most in the 215 mode, far shorter than many here.

 

Sorry I didn't look you up again to fish when I picked the kid up from UVM a couple weeks ago, we came and left very quickly.

Thanks Jon.  As it is, I probably would have not been able to go out.  Messed up a couple discs many years ago in a car accident and it has been acting up-pinching nerve that leads to my arms...not fun.  going to be doing PT soon.

 

I thought last year you were recommending the Aqua bound Stingray Hybrid?

Edited by blackdogfish

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Here's a question.  As you move out of the mid-tier paddles (with composite carbon or carbon fiber shafts and composite or nylon blades) and into higher end, where you have 100% carbon fiber shafts and carbon fiber blades...weight is going from about 28-29 ounces down to 23-24 ounces.

Question....what is the difference of four ounces going to make?  If you were used to a 28 ounce paddle and went to a 23 ounce fully carbon-fiber, will you REALLY notice the difference or is it marginal?

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I have been paddling for a number of years and also have instructed paddling for a good portion of that time. Let me tell you that you are not the first person faced with this situation. In my experience there are more than one way to address this. You can paddle low angle style, which would require a somewhat longer paddle with thinner longer blades. Traditional style would give you a lighter paddle with  less resistance and different approach. Both these styles would put less stress on ones body. Another way to approach this would be by using a one piece wooden paddle. With a one piece paddle the shaft has a bit of flex and reduces body stress. The same would be true for a one piece carbon shaft. Any weight you can afford to save will also help. Paddling stress is accumulative. Hope this helps.

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, blackdogfish said:

Here's a question.  As you move out of the mid-tier paddles (with composite carbon or carbon fiber shafts and composite or nylon blades) and into higher end, where you have 100% carbon fiber shafts and carbon fiber blades...weight is going from about 28-29 ounces down to 23-24 ounces.

Question....what is the difference of four ounces going to make?  If you were used to a 28 ounce paddle and went to a 23 ounce fully carbon-fiber, will you REALLY notice the difference or is it marginal?

My personal opinion is I can hold up a 30 oz paddle all day, the stress from actually paddling is much higher, which is why I say reduce resistance and up the cadence. Sure lighter is better, but I'm not willing to pay another $250 to shave 7 oz. That's just me, and I don't have any current shoulder problems. And I've never had an Aqua Bound, when I saw you I had the BB. Both companies have the same parent however.

 

 

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I use a cheap paddle.  I don't think the extra oz.s are the problem. All the stress on the shoulder is from digging the paddle into the water,

fighting the waves, wind and current.  

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17 hours ago, Fishinjohny said:

I have been paddling for a number of years and also have instructed paddling for a good portion of that time. Let me tell you that you are not the first person faced with this situation. In my experience there are more than one way to address this. You can paddle low angle style, which would require a somewhat longer paddle with thinner longer blades. Traditional style would give you a lighter paddle with  less resistance and different approach. Both these styles would put less stress on ones body. Another way to approach this would be by using a one piece wooden paddle. With a one piece paddle the shaft has a bit of flex and reduces body stress. The same would be true for a one piece carbon shaft. Any weight you can afford to save will also help. Paddling stress is accumulative. Hope this helps.

 

 

 

 

With a one-piece, you have no feathering adjustment, correct?

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