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Good2Go

Target shooting backstop

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Been thinking about what I could do to create a safe back stop for pistol and rifle shooting. I don't live on 100 acres in the middle of a Texas desert, but do have some room around me with with woods and no immediate neighbors within 100 yards. I just cut a large white oak down (friggin gypsy moths killed it a year ago) and was thinking I could stack the rounds or 1/2 splits and that would provide a good backstop. Any thoughts/experience on this approach? Pistols would be 22 or 9 mm, rifles 22 or .308. No M-79s. Too bad!

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If you have to question the viability of an action, that right there tells you to do something else. This is so far removed from being a solid backstop. 

 

Let us know what exact town you live in so when the news states person/home hit with stray bullet we know the chain of events. 

 

100 yds, it’s a good thing you are SO far from the next human that that rifle or pistol round will never travel that far. One of the rule in firing a gun is know your travel and it’s end. 

 

You need to look at travel distances of rounds. Then contemplate the results of the action. 

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10 hours ago, Good2Go said:

Been thinking about what I could do to create a safe back stop for pistol and rifle shooting. I don't live on 100 acres in the middle of a Texas desert, but do have some room around me with with woods and no immediate neighbors within 100 yards. I just cut a large white oak down (friggin gypsy moths killed it a year ago) and was thinking I could stack the rounds or 1/2 splits and that would provide a good backstop. Any thoughts/experience on this approach? Pistols would be 22 or 9 mm, rifles 22 or .308. No M-79s. Too bad!

I have a small area on my property I shoot on but strictly pistols. I shoot at metal targets almost exclusively. The backstop is a thick swamp with a hill behind it, all on my property. I have 2 houses behind me about 400 feet away. Never been a problem and I feel it's perfectly safe. The thing I try to do is shoot when neighbors aren't home as to not annoy them. I have pictures of it, I'll try to find them and post them.

 

5cdff07ba2ad3_TheTargetRangeApril2014010.JPG.73dcfebf7af1459fd11c2e569707375f.JPG

 

5cdff132a2a80_TheTargetRangeApril2014008.JPG.c7b24a03c980927081c17080583e3a9a.JPG5cdff169e1677_TheTargetRangeApril2014003.JPG.9277b4523c01f7e020136cef705cf99e.JPG

 

The logs piled behind the steel targets were moved before shooting.

Edited by Bass Ackwards

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49 mins ago, saltfisherman said:

If you have to question the viability of an action, that right there tells you to do something else. This is so far removed from being a solid backstop. 

 

Let us know what exact town you live in so when the news states person/home hit with stray bullet we know the chain of events. 

 

100 yds, it’s a good thing you are SO far from the next human that that rifle or pistol round will never travel that far. One of the rule in firing a gun is know your travel and it’s end. 

 

You need to look at travel distances of rounds. Then contemplate the results of the action. 

 

Helpful, nice  :)

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10 hours ago, Good2Go said:

Been thinking about what I could do to create a safe back stop for pistol and rifle shooting. I don't live on 100 acres in the middle of a Texas desert, but do have some room around me with with woods and no immediate neighbors within 100 yards. I just cut a large white oak down (friggin gypsy moths killed it a year ago) and was thinking I could stack the rounds or 1/2 splits and that would provide a good backstop. Any thoughts/experience on this approach? Pistols would be 22 or 9 mm, rifles 22 or .308. No M-79s. Too bad!

 

Anyway...

 

The logs make a lousy back-stop for obvious reasons.  That said, with only 100yds to the nearest 911 caller I'd reconsider the idea.  There is a sheet ton of energy after a ricochet...more than enough to span that distance.  However unlikely, your insurance company would also take a dim view of any claim caused by your firearm use in a confined area.  Adding to that scenario is the fact any strange damage to a neighbor's home (not even your fault) and you'll be having a long conversation with the popo.

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This was done by a friend of mine. 

 

Sunk a a row of 4x4 posts in a 5 row front, followed by a 4 row, filled by a three row. 

 

Placed used tires over each post and stacked about 5 feet high. Filled middle of each stack with sand. 

 

Used with .223, .357 mag and 10mm. Bullets never made it to back row. And the tires were free frontier dump and garages. 

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DMacs suggestion is a great one. 

 

The .308 is probably your most warranted worry with the list of calibers you mentioned. A dirt berm will stop the pistol rounds pretty well. I’ve seen ballistics testing tunnels be built inside of commercial warehouse spaces (where no one in adjacent occupied spaces had a clue they were there) and they built from the front back- 6x6 pressure treated posts laid horizontally to make an 8’x8’ wall, pea sized crushed stone for about a foot, then 2x6 pressure treated stacked on end horizontally, then about 2’ of sand and then a cinder block wall. They threw everything up to and including 20mm at it. You’d just feel a little rumble in the floor when they pewed. 

 

Funny short story... I was there for work one day, smoking a cig out front and someone working in the suite next door walked over and asked what they did in there. I asked why they wanted to know. They said every once in a while the things on their desk would shake. I have no idea what they do in there, but it looks fun :shrug:

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Thanks for all the input. Kinda an odd situation on my lot, would not be conducive to a dump truck bringing in a lot of sand/6X6's/tires, etc. Maybe just limit my shooting on my lot to 22's. I think a 30" thick white oak round would stop them. And of course I know what's behind my line of fire. Check out Google earth. 

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Just use good ole common sense, no outdoor range is perfect. The Blue Trails range in Wallingford has a small mountain behind it yet every so often a bullet finds it's way to a house on the other side of that mountain.

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We build two on a friend property (over a 100 acres) with just about everything that was said already, but you always have to keep checking it to make sure it still safe... and the number one thing when dealing with outdoor range that belong to you... is who you let shoot on it.. some people just have no common sense at all... we are real strict on who comes to shoot... and as far as just shooting a .22 those damn things at times seem to just bounce the oddest ways...You might not believe this but we had someone shooting and somehow it went up into the air and came down and hit other person in his hand, he didn't get badly hurt.. but it was a eye opener..and like was said already "Common Sense" goes a long way with any type of shooting... 

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When I was working for the Air Force as a contractor, I had to qualify with the M-9 once a year. Their range was a dirt berm with a wood overhang. Every so often, they would have to dig up the berm and remove the spent bullets as rounds would hit other bullets already in the berm and cause rounds to leave the range. It got so expensive to do the job that we started using frangible ammo after the last clean up. Just something to think about...

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On 5/22/2019 at 8:39 AM, Bass Ackwards said:

Just use good ole common sense, no outdoor range is perfect. The Blue Trails range in Wallingford has a small mountain behind it yet every so often a bullet finds it's way to a house on the other side of that mountain.

Because the real estate developer Pat DiNapolitano plants whole cartridges there.  :rolleyes:

 

He has his own shooting range too right behind that saddle.  :rolleyes:

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