coldclam

Never ending...

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21 hours ago, squidder 329 said:

I wondered if it would be better to have the rock piles parallel to the beach with openings spaced as needed. They may not hold the sand but they would slow it down and create a fish habitat. 

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Where does the sand come from that they use to replenish? Do they dredge it from the water and bring it back or do they bring it in from elsewere? 

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It's dredged from right off the beach. You can see them now from Seaside north. You can also see loads of charcoal on the beach and in the surf where they dug deep into what I've heard is buried ancient forest.

 

Thinking about shore development this week, I thought, if people who own properties don't live there, then they can't vote who runs the local government. If the residents are primarily  Real Estate Agents, Builders, Contractors and land developers, It would seem that foxes, coyotes and wolves are guarding the hen house.      

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On ‎5‎/‎18‎/‎2019 at 3:49 PM, aae0130 said:

Where does the sand come from that they use to replenish? Do they dredge it from the water and bring it back or do they bring it in from elsewere? 

All that nice sandy fishy structure offshore, like Mansquan Ridge.  

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The reasoning for replenishment as well as moving away from and in cases removing the jetties all has to do with the amount of sand in the "system" as the ACOE regularly puts it. Their thinking is that jetties often caused sand to be jettisoned from the system to offshore deposits. This sand was not likely to come back via wave action.

 

The sand is dredged from offshore ridges and is supposed to be a close or near match to the current grain size on our beaches. The problem is that not only does their testing of the borrow sites seem suspect at best, but that the suitable/desirable sites have mostly been depleted. We're actually running out of appropriate areas to dredge sand from.

 

With all of the beaches replenished throughout the state they feel it should stabilize somewhat. We'll see what happens. I've never had much faith in the entire project.

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11 mins ago, surfcityNJ said:

The reasoning for replenishment as well as moving away from and in cases removing the jetties all has to do with the amount of sand in the "system" as the ACOE regularly puts it. Their thinking is that jetties often caused sand to be jettisoned from the system to offshore deposits. This sand was not likely to come back via wave action.

 

The sand is dredged from offshore ridges and is supposed to be a close or near match to the current grain size on our beaches. The problem is that not only does their testing of the borrow sites seem suspect at best, but that the suitable/desirable sites have mostly been depleted. We're actually running out of appropriate areas to dredge sand from.

 

With all of the beaches replenished throughout the state they feel it should stabilize somewhat. We'll see what happens. I've never had much faith in the entire project.

So before beach replenishment the beaches lost all of their sand and never recovered? Sorry but their excuse for "moving away from jetties" is total BS. The sand moved and came back depending on current and swell/surf.

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They make the science up as they go. There are hundreds of groins in NJ and every inlet has jetties.They were put in to protect against erosion and littoral drift filling the channels. Overall they were a far better solution than simply dredge and drop, wash away and repeat ad infinitum. Who built all those rock piles ? I now live in NY. NY has it's own issues and plenty of groins and jetties. The current Rockaway Peninsula plan calls for extending existing groins seaward and building several new ones.If they work in NY they will work in NJ. The littoral drift is the same problem in either. There is no 100% foolproof solution. Mother Nature has a big hammer.It does seem however that what NY and NJ had years ago is far better than this new direction. Someone's pockets are being lined.

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