bob_G

Ticks

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9 hours ago, bob_G said:

Odd, but I'm finding far more ticks in my yard on the cape than I am hunting in west central Ma.

I live in south central Mass near the Conn. border. So far so good on not finding ticks on me or my black lab. I don't know if it is the amount of rain we have had up here.

 

I copied and pasted your quote without picking up the picture this time.

 

 

 

 

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What blood type do ticks prefer?

Ever wonder why some people are more likely to be bitten by a tick than others? Researchers in the Czech Republic claim it may have to do with a person’s blood type. “The influence of blood groups on certain diseases such as malaria or some cancers has been already discussed and proved,” the authors point out. Type O blood has been linked to the slow progression of malaria, transmitted by mosquitoes. “This may suggest that there could be a similar relationship between tick-borne diseases and some blood group(s).”

 

To explore the possible association, Žákovská and colleagues from Masaryk University in the Czech Republic conducted a pilot study using an in vitro method. Blood from volunteers was placed on the perimeter of filter paper placed on a Petri dish. One hundred nymphal Ixodes ricinus ticks were collected in Ruda near the Brno Reservoir. Ixodes ricinus ticks are the most common species of ticks in Europe as well as in the Czech Republic. They are also the primary vector of Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacteria which causes Lyme disease.

 

Ixodes ricinus, also called the castor bean tick, is found primarily in Europe.

Tick behavior was monitored at 1 and 2 minute intervals to determine which drop of blood they preferred. “It can be stated that the most statistically preferred was blood group A, followed by the second groups – O and AB,” writes Žákovská. Type B blood was the least preferred blood group.

Of course, the findings need to be replicated in an in vivo study, since other factors could influence the ticks’ feeding preferences in a living organism. However, we cannot use model animals, writes Žákovská, because different animal species have different systems of blood groups.

Studies on mosquitoes have shown preferences for certain blood types, according to a literature review by the authors. These studies used human volunteers. “In one case, they allowed the mosquitoes to feed on the exposed hands of volunteers,” explains Žákovská. “In the second study, the experimenters were studying only ‘landing’ preferences of mosquitoes with amputated proboscis.”

People with Blood Type A should be wary of ticks. Study shows ticks prefer Type A blood.

So, what about using human volunteers? Unfortunately, “this approach involves increased risk of contracting a tick-borne infection,” writes Žákovská.

Or, the authors suggest “amputate the proboscis of the vector and/or use ticks which have been both bred and kept from eggs in sterile conditions to avoid the risk of carrying infectious agents.”

The study’s authors conclude that “blood group might be one of the factors determining the feeding preferences of Ixodes ricinus ticks.” And they warn, “people with the risk blood type A should take appropriate measures to protect themselves more effectively, and decrease the risk of contracting dangerous zoonotic diseases transmitted by ticks.”

 

Source: http://danielcameronmd.com/what-blood-type-do-ticks-prefer/

 

Although the study was done in the Czech Republic with a different species of ticks, it may very well be the same with deer ticks.   

 

 FWIW   I happen to be A+ and had both the experimental Lyme vaccine and Lyme disease. 

 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I live in a town, Norwell, that is the “Hotspot” for Lyme disease in Mass. The past couple of years we have been getting a lot of wild turkeys coming up to the house to feed under the bird feeders. While hanging out in the yard they wander around like chickens gleaning the insects they find. Before the turkeys started hanging around I would find deer ticks on me starting in February!  Most times I went out into the garden and even taking out the trash I used to find ticks on me. I have been treated for Lyme disease 4-5 times. Since the turkeys started hanging around the ticks have been a rare occurrence. I found the first tick on me in 2 years recently. Love those turkeys! 

Edited by fishing bum wannabe

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1 hour ago, fishing bum wannabe said:

I live in a town, Norwell, that is the “Hotspot” for Lyme disease in Mass. The past couple of years we have been getting a lot of wild turkeys coming up to the house to feed under the bird feeders. While hanging out in the yard they wander around like chickens gleaning the insects they find. Before the turkeys started hanging around I would find deer ticks on me starting in February!  Most times I went out into the garden and even taking out the trash I used to find ticks on me. I have been treated for Lyme disease 4-5 times. Since the turkeys started hanging around the ticks have been a rare occurrence. I found the first tick on me in 2 years recently. Love those turkeys! 

You and me both

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1 hour ago, fishing bum wannabe said:

I live in a town, Norwell, that is the “Hotspot” for Lyme disease in Mass. The past couple of years we have been getting a lot of wild turkeys coming up to the house to feed under the bird feeders. While hanging out in the yard they wander around like chickens gleaning the insects they find. Before the turkeys started hanging around I would find deer ticks on me starting in February!  Most times I went out into the garden and even taking out the trash I used to find ticks on me. I have been treated for Lyme disease 4-5 times. Since the turkeys started hanging around the ticks have been a rare occurrence. I found the first tick on me in 2 years recently. Love those turkeys! 

each spring i look very forward to the “lines of polts” (10-12 side by side) to walk thru the yard.  once they pass thru i sometimes don’t see a single tick from there for the rest of the season.   gotta love mother nature.

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16 hours ago, bob_G said:

Next thing you're going to say you're taking up turkey hunting.

Turkey hunting appears to need more expertise than deer.  Suffolk County (N.Y.) has several thousand, and hunting began a couple of years ago. The first season's take was ... two. Just two birds, whereas the deer hunters apparently do quite well. There's a taxidermist and deer butcher in the same strip mall as houses J&H tackle, a large local tackle store; in season he's always got guys comparing the deer in the back of their pickups.

 

A question. A 12-ga. is the turkey standard, that's fine. Suffolk NY allows no rifle hunting of any kind. (This goes back to the 1930s, when Suffolk was one large potato and cabbage field; no doubt the law reflects some tragedy.) I recall seeing combination .22 / 12 ga. firearms made for turkey hunting.  Are those legal in Mass.? 

 

If and when my shotgun practice becomes adequate, I'll be trying my hand at waterfowl, specifically Canada geese. The 1100 should be fine ... the .303 is probably a bit much for ducks and turkeys, so that one will stay home. 

 

Speaking of ticks again, I had to deal with a few today after an early AM trip to the beach. And no fish ... (sigh.)  Time to see if anything's left in the Permethrin spray bottle. 

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6 hours ago, FizzyFish said:

What blood type do ticks prefer?

Ever wonder why some people are more likely to be bitten by a tick than others? Researchers in the Czech Republic claim it may have to do with a person’s blood type. “The influence of blood groups on certain diseases such as malaria or some cancers has been already discussed and proved,” the authors point out. Type O blood has been linked to the slow progression of malaria, transmitted by mosquitoes. “This may suggest that there could be a similar relationship between tick-borne diseases and some blood group(s).”

 

To explore the possible association, Žákovská and colleagues from Masaryk University in the Czech Republic conducted a pilot study using an in vitro method. Blood from volunteers was placed on the perimeter of filter paper placed on a Petri dish. One hundred nymphal Ixodes ricinus ticks were collected in Ruda near the Brno Reservoir. Ixodes ricinus ticks are the most common species of ticks in Europe as well as in the Czech Republic. They are also the primary vector of Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacteria which causes Lyme disease.

 

Ixodes ricinus, also called the castor bean tick, is found primarily in Europe.

Tick behavior was monitored at 1 and 2 minute intervals to determine which drop of blood they preferred. “It can be stated that the most statistically preferred was blood group A, followed by the second groups – O and AB,” writes Žákovská. Type B blood was the least preferred blood group.

Of course, the findings need to be replicated in an in vivo study, since other factors could influence the ticks’ feeding preferences in a living organism. However, we cannot use model animals, writes Žákovská, because different animal species have different systems of blood groups.

Studies on mosquitoes have shown preferences for certain blood types, according to a literature review by the authors. These studies used human volunteers. “In one case, they allowed the mosquitoes to feed on the exposed hands of volunteers,” explains Žákovská. “In the second study, the experimenters were studying only ‘landing’ preferences of mosquitoes with amputated proboscis.”

People with Blood Type A should be wary of ticks. Study shows ticks prefer Type A blood.

So, what about using human volunteers? Unfortunately, “this approach involves increased risk of contracting a tick-borne infection,” writes Žákovská.

Or, the authors suggest “amputate the proboscis of the vector and/or use ticks which have been both bred and kept from eggs in sterile conditions to avoid the risk of carrying infectious agents.”

The study’s authors conclude that “blood group might be one of the factors determining the feeding preferences of Ixodes ricinus ticks.” And they warn, “people with the risk blood type A should take appropriate measures to protect themselves more effectively, and decrease the risk of contracting dangerous zoonotic diseases transmitted by ticks.”

 

Source: http://danielcameronmd.com/what-blood-type-do-ticks-prefer/

 

Although the study was done in the Czech Republic with a different species of ticks, it may very well be the same with deer ticks.   

 

 FWIW   I happen to be A+ and had both the experimental Lyme vaccine and Lyme disease. 

 

Something worth knowing ... I'm AB+.

 

 

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1 hour ago, BrianBM said:

Turkey hunting appears to need more expertise than deer.  Suffolk County (N.Y.) has several thousand, and hunting began a couple of years ago. The first season's take was ... two. Just two birds, whereas the deer hunters apparently do quite well. There's a taxidermist and deer butcher in the same strip mall as houses J&H tackle, a large local tackle store; in season he's always got guys comparing the deer in the back of their pickups.

 

A question. A 12-ga. is the turkey standard, that's fine. Suffolk NY allows no rifle hunting of any kind. (This goes back to the 1930s, when Suffolk was one large potato and cabbage field; no doubt the law reflects some tragedy.) I recall seeing combination .22 / 12 ga. firearms made for turkey hunting.  Are those legal in Mass.? 

 

If and when my shotgun practice becomes adequate, I'll be trying my hand at waterfowl, specifically Canada geese. The 1100 should be fine ... the .303 is probably a bit much for ducks and turkeys, so that one will stay home. 

 

Speaking of ticks again, I had to deal with a few today after an early AM trip to the beach. And no fish ... (sigh.)  Time to see if anything's left in the Permethrin spray bottle. 

Brian 

A good hunter will tell you deer and turkey are equally challenging.

When deer hunting you need to be keenly aware of your scent and wind direction. 

Turkey rely soley on their eye sight and amazing hearing. They have unrivaled survival instincts.They also have an uncanny ability to locate precisely the souce of a human calling, even from incredible distances.  However calling turkey is the deal breaker. A red hot gobble can detect a fraud in short order, and will walk away never to be heard from again.  It took me years to become proficient. I don't consider myself good yet, even after 35 years. Turkey hunting began in Ma in 1984. Back in those days there was no help. It was in its infancy. There was no internet. I used to buy calling tapes fron Cabelas and play them in my car. Driving with a diaphragm call in my mouth trying to imitate what I was hearing. But nothing beats the real thing.  I spent hundreds of hours in the pre season calling and practicing on live birds. Took some nice photos along the way.

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I've got a sudden image of you on a nice summer day, everyone's driving with the windows open. Someone pulls alongside you, and as he glances in your direction, you start gobbling.  :)

A cheerful image. 

 

Do you ever hunt turkeys from a blind? Do people do that?

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1 hour ago, BrianBM said:

I've got a sudden image of you on a nice summer day, everyone's driving with the windows open. Someone pulls alongside you, and as he glances in your direction, you start gobbling.  :)

A cheerful image. 

Now that’s funny!

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Took my dogs for several walks this weekend on the canal. First trip of the year for the camper and it somehow ended up with quite a few ants inside. After one of the walks I felt something on my neck. Reached up and grabbed what I thought was the "ant", it ended up being a tick.

 

I love how they pop when you burn them with a lighter.  

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Be careful. I have had three crawling on me. Was glad to get them off before the had a feast. 

 

I also found one partially embedded on the inside flap of my dog's ear. Got it out though. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

On 5/14/2019 at 6:48 PM, bob_G said:

Odd, but I'm finding far more ticks in my yard on the cape than I am hunting in west central Ma.

My father was out in Belchertown yesterday at my sister’s place planting a dogwood and came back with a deer tick in him. He sent it in to get tested.  Hopefully it comes back negative as he’s had some health issues the last couple years. 

 

On another note, we started using Mosquito Ranger this year and so far so good, fingers crossed 

Edited by rbart

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