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Good time of the year.

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DoorGunner

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Getting the boats in and clearing out the shop to put our stuff outside again.

Screwed down the table top and a light sanding. Then a nice smooth coat of Helmsman Spar Urethane.

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All ten of the Yellow Submarines are back up.

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And the eight foot high summer flounder and sign post are in place.

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6 hours ago, brentwayne said:

Looking good Fred.  How’s the drop net producing?

Tons of grass shrimp, small blueclaws and a few mud crabs plus more minnows every day. No shiners yet but water is warming so never know what will come up in that net. 

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7 mins ago, DoorGunner said:

Tons of grass shrimp, small blueclaws and a few mud crabs plus more minnows every day. No shiners yet but water is warming so never know what will come up in that net. 

 

Well get me some stuff, will ya'?  Come on already..............

 

I got this all set up and NO ONE to put in it.

 

And yes, while Red could fit in it, I'm looking to give company something cool to look at, not scare them away in horror.

 

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Edited by JoeyZac
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12 mins ago, JoeyZac said:

 

Well get me some stuff, will ya'?  Come on already..............

 

I got this all set up and NO ONE to put in it.

 

And yes, while Red could fit in it, I'm looking to give company something cool to look at, not scare them away in horror.

 

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I'll try harder. Maybe even put bait in it. Did have a few three spined sticklebacks last week. Interested? 

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Got one of them already, so they're not worth a special trip, but if you come across some when I'm already coming for something else, sure, throw them in.

 

Now, how about this?  This stickle back has been in the tank for months, with that bigger Fluke, all winter.  The Fluke has been eating minnows, shrimp and chunks all winter, and the stickle isn't hiding.  He just swims around right out in the open.  Fluke hasn't hit it.  Coincidence?

 

Here's a shopping list............  Blenny, baby Sea Bass, baby Puffers, baby Tog, Sea Horse, baby Flounder (Winter and Summer), Choker, Hermits, baby Drum, baby Spot, baby Cracker, baby Robin, and anything tropical that is here by accident.

 

At some point, I'll probably get all of them off my dock, but items in red I'll come right down for.

 

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I do a drag net with a seine and have gotten all of those and baby trumpets, bluefish and fluke. It's a lot of fun. 

"You must never confuse faith that you will prevail in the end -- which you can never afford to loose -- with the discipline to confront the most brutal facts of your current reality, whatever they may be .."

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8 hours ago, JoeyZac said:

 

 

Now, how about this?  This stickle back has been in the tank for months, with that bigger Fluke, all winter.  The Fluke has been eating minnows, shrimp and chunks all winter, and the stickle isn't hiding.  He just swims around right out in the open.  Fluke hasn't hit it.  Coincidence?

 

 

 

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They know what they are doing down there. Most fish have to swallow food whole including summer flounder, weakies and stripers. They either learn or by instinct know what will go down without any danger. The spines of a stickleback can easily catch in the throat of a predator. Have seen all three of these fish swallow whole baby crabs with little trouble and crabs are 360 degrees of points so there are no rules in granite when it comes to eating.

Noticed this when striper fishing back it their prime years. Spots were a fantastic live bait yet small croakers weren't. Stripers could swallow a live spot in a second and figured they could do the same with a croaker but put one on a hook and rarely did it draw a strike. Then I took a close look at the croaker. Hold a spot in your hand and it just lays there flat. Do the same with a croaker and it locks it's body in a curved position with it's gill plates extended out and also locked. Seen small croakers do this in our aquarium whenever a striper of flounder got close. As soon as it did the predator backed off. If you have ever caught croakers then you know that the edge of the gill plate is like a razor blade and cuts just like it. Dangerous to try to swallow something curved and spiny with razor blades on it's sides. Again, it's either a learned skill or by instinct but most predators will avoid these dangers unless driven by starvation.

One of my friends who kept his boat at our dock came in with a beautiful baby cobia about three inches long. Looked great in the aquarium then it went on the hunt. Took a live grass shrimp and a few minutes later it was dead. Examined the cobia and saw what had happened. Grass shrimp have legs and two long thin claws that work just like a crabs. Hard to see because they are so small. They also have two very sharp hard spear like points sticking straight out from it's head. Ever reach in and grabs some grass shrimp and you will almost always get stuck by one or more. Hurts like hell if the points break off and stay inside. Predators don't have a problem swallowing them because the shrimp are so small but for a baby cobia it was a mouth full of trouble. When I looked at the cobia with a magnifying glass I could see and feel the two sharp spikes sticking right through the top of it's head. Not sure what the baby cobia feed on out there but I'm guessing it's not full grown grass shrimp. Even the little things out there have a defense and it's up to the bigger things to figure it all out.     

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3 mins ago, robtf said:

I always wonder why there is no problem eating a mantis shrimp, given those razor claws they have??

It's their two main claws that are the dangerous ones.

 

Here is a shot of the one of them that causes all the problems.

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Here is a shot of a praying mantis with it's two front claws ready to strike.

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Mantis shrimp live in holes they dig in the bottom and come out head first. I'm figuring that a predator like a flounder sees movement and moves in and waits. Mantis shrimp shows itself as it begins to exit the hole and the flounder strikes before the mantis ever had a chance to pull the trigger. If it can't cock it's weapon it's useless and a flounders strike is so quick and powerful that the mantis never knew what hit it. Take the strongest man in the world and wrap him up in plastic and he is defenseless. As soon as the mantis goes into a predators mouth it's basically wrapped in plastic and defenseless. 

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9 hours ago, JoeyZac said:

Got one of them already, so they're not worth a special trip, but if you come across some when I'm already coming for something else, sure, throw them in.

 

Now, how about this?  This stickle back has been in the tank for months, with that bigger Fluke, all winter.  The Fluke has been eating minnows, shrimp and chunks all winter, and the stickle isn't hiding.  He just swims around right out in the open.  Fluke hasn't hit it.  Coincidence?

 

Here's a shopping list............  Blenny, baby Sea Bass, baby Puffers, baby Tog, Sea Horse, baby Flounder (Winter and Summer), Choker, Hermits, baby Drum, baby Spot, baby Cracker, baby Robin, and anything tropical that is here by accident.

 

At some point, I'll probably get all of them off my dock, but items in red I'll come right down for.

 

20190502_215146.jpg.319e8515276188315cb04e81c7596801.jpg

Why do you put clothes in the tank?

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A few days with two pots off the end of the dock and I ended up with 22 decent size blueclaws. All are cooked and cleaned and seasoned, ready for tomorrow evening. 

Did this all summer into fall last year and loved every pickin minute of it. We talked about it through the winter months and now it's finally here. Finished making some stuffing for shrooms and even picked up some new wider picking tolls to start the crabfest off. 

Always amazed that people will pay up to $40.00 for a dozen #1 crabs when they are walking around right off docks and bulkheads. 

Hooking our pump up on Monday for our minnow tanks. Only need one right now so the other becomes my crab keeper so I can collect them all week. Feed them an entire cut up in small pieces bunker every day to keep them happy. I do love my work.  

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