rockyoutdoors

Buy A New Trailer Or Rebuild my Old One......

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I have a 2004 Load Rite tandem boat trailer with rollers that I have maintained as good as I could over the years. I haul my 22' boat where ever the bite is from the Raritan Bay to Cape May. I started pricing out a new one and I am looking in the area of $5,000.00. I honestly did not know they cost that much. What I would replace is the torsion axels, rollers, washers, clips, fenders, U-bolts and nuts.  So my question is has anyone re built a trailer and how satisfied were you after doing so?

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Rebuilt my 10,000# Myco tandem about 10 years ago.

 

Aluminum I-Beam Bunk.  Cross members were steel and a few had holes from rust.  Bad corrosion on the alum due to mating of dissimalar metals.

 

Had a couple new crossmembers  fabbed, blasted all of them and had them hot dipped galvanized.  Cut out bad alum, made plates to go in the holes I cut out and had a friend tig them in.  Put it back together with extended plates on the outside of the welded areas to reinforce, and a plastic kind of like those flimsy cutting boards on the inside to isolate the dissimilar metals.

 

New torsion axles from (I forget the name) in Alabama or Luisiana with new disc brakes to match.  Half the money of buying local.  Big trailer supply house whatever it was.

 

Very satisfied how it turned out and has held up.  Certainly beat replacing it, thats a ton of fuel money.  I was lucky with shop and a lift truck to handle the shipping, a large blast cabinet, and contacts in the metal industry.

 

Your project is 'a bit' easier than mine, go for it.

Edited by makorider

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Why are you replacing torsion axles?

I have 2002 EZ Loader tandem trailer just replaced all the roller clips some washers, bushings all with the boat on the trailer. The rest of the hardware while showing signs of corrosion is still in decent shape. I also installed a complete disc brake system three years ago. When my torsion axles get bad I’ll probably replace them as the rest of my galvanized frame is solid. 

I rather put the money toward the boat than having a brand new trailer. 

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price out the axle first and the shape of the brakes if they need replacement. if you got a lot of rust you may need to saw or burn off  bolts etc. take it to a dealer who sells trailers to get an estimate on the parts. does it need tires it will get to the point where the parts can get close to thirty percent of the cost then there is the labor which can cost 130.00 per hour or more. maybe you could sell it to somebody who only needs it for short hauls and storage.If I was running up and down the coast of jersey I would want something reliable under my boat

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Posted (edited) · Report post

my trailer needs serious work too, been holding off way to long

 

how did you know the torsion axles were bad?

 

if it worth buying stainless steel brakes?

Edited by ferret

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I bought a galvanized Loadrite in 2007, turns out the axle wasn't galvanized and broke on my way home from pulling the boat out for the winter. Luckily I had trailer insurance from Boat US.

 

It was a 1200# rated, not big deal for new axle and springs.

 

I'm getting ready to upgrade the trailer under my GW 180 right now, will be fun with the boat still on it. If you can find somewhere to leave the boat while you work on the trailer it will be easier.

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I rebuilt a 2005 loadright that needed a torsion axial and some other smaller parts,

four years later I regret not spending the money on an aluminum replacement.

Oh and after spending over 600 for a replacement torsion axial next one will have springs.

FYI you might want to call around and make a trip and tow a new one home, FL comes to mind.

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I’ve looked at aluminum trailers however I’m not convinced that the trailer manufacturers put enough research and development into minimizing galvanic corrosion 

so I will most likely go with a galvanized replacement when the time comes. 

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10 hours ago, Live Liner said:

 then there is the labor which can cost 130.00 per hour or more. 

I get that time can be a factor, but really, if you cant rebuild a trailer it means you can't hold a sawzall or turn a nut.

 

Boat ownership may not be for that person.

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9 hours ago, ferret said:

my trailer needs serious work too, been holding off way to long

 

how did you know the torsion axles were bad?

 

if it worth buying stainless steel brakes?

In my case, they were getting pretty damn fugly with rust, particularly the articulating part.  I just didn't trust them.

 

Assuming you have disc brakes, IMO no not worth switching until you have to.  Mine are not stainless and still work great.  If converting from drum then yes, in retrospect, go stainless

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Most Hardware was bought at my cost .I just redid mybunks  on a 19 foot catamaran with carpet new boards ,u bolts,new mounts and I was probably in it for 250-300 plus my time about a weekend. 

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I had mine redone at Maximum Marine in south Jersey.  Great work, they stand by it, and they are efficient in getting it done. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

 

2 hours ago, makorider said:

In my case, they were getting pretty damn fugly with rust, particularly the articulating part.  I just didn't trust them.

 

Assuming you have disc brakes, IMO no not worth switching until you have to.  Mine are not stainless and still work great.  If converting from drum then yes, in retrospect, go stainless

My trailer has discs, but they are rotted to the the core and do not work.  Also my trailer has two axles but brakes on only one, thinking about adding discs to the second axle, if so do I need to run a second bake fluid line fro the actuator or can I just split the line near the calipers?

Edited by ferret

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