Joe G

What was your........

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Joe when some one has been fishing for a long time you sort of have a few stories to recall . This is one about a time when after clearing a nice spot of all of its stones and placing them on a man made jetty behind the Ball field I finally decided to make the effort put into clearing the area of stones to work my way down among the brush from the road way.

One needed to find the entrance among the brush to get down to the waters edge and the man made jetty. It was a place where at one time on an east current you could put a few nice fluke on a stringer to take home. This night I decided to fish with skins and buck tails on a west change down to the bottom , once the water had been running for an hour into the west. This way I could safely emerge from the brush and slide into the water to the left of the man made jetty. which had helped build along with a couple other canal rats over the years.

Now as every one knows fishing in the dark is no east task, but the lights from the Bridge above provided just enough light to make sure I could make a cast with my conventional reel a 7000 abu loaded with 40 pound mono at the time. I had my favorite Jigging rod a custom made 3m lami 9ft 2 inches long . I would make my normal cast up to the right let it touch bottom and with the reel in free spool work the skin all the way under the middle of the bridge almost running out of line before engaging the spool and working it back to make another cast.

Every once in the while the cars sitting across from me in the parking lot would turn on there lights to see if they could see me catching any fish. I was able to put a few nice fish on the beach behind me and releasing them for some one else to catch.  The water was still running west and I decided to put on one of my jigs and once again I let it go under the bridge before engaging the spool . I get this little tap and then all fury happened as I was into a fish of great size. I had to let the fish do its thing as I was almost down to a spare spool as I held on for dear life with my rod secured in my leather pouch I just held onto it until it tired . I began to gain some line as I thought the fish was tiring , but in reality it was swimming against the west current < I was able to gain some line when the fish decided to swim against the current , until it got some where in front of me and then I am now facing towards the right of where I was standing and the jetty was now under my line as the fish continued to swim.

If I allowed the fish to continue I would have lost it given the situation in hand . It seemed like an eternity and I stopped reeling  and decided to strum the line to see if the fish would head back towards the west as it swam further east. This was an old trick I had learned from my mentor Peter Cochis  in another time.

I feel the fish changing direction and I once again began to gain enough line on the reel so that I knew I could allow it to run should it continue to thump the rod . I know I now have the fish close to where I am standing in the water , but I new I had to walk backwards to bring the fish up onto dry land. I am estimating now how far away it is and I turn on my light hung around my neck to see where it was.

Once I did that I had 3 or 4 cars turn on there lights[high beams ] across the way and I lost my night vision and was blinded long enough to misjudge where the fish was as I began to continue walking backwards onto the dry beach I had worked on for such happenings .

My line goes slack and the fish is gone. The fish had me down on my knees when the line went slack , victory was hers that night.  My jig was not on my leader and to this day I do not know if a fish of a life time that gave me a battle royal got away because I did not close the clip or during the battle the fish was able to open the clip .

To this day that would have been one fish that I would have like to at least see, but it was not to be.  Just another memory from the big river we all call the Cape Cod Canal, a place where dreams are made and broken

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Man, lots of memories.  Some stand out more than others.  One late Oct night on the beaches of P town I had a surprise. Some exceptional fish along the islands.

But if I had to narrow it down to one fish, it would be that big fish I took July of 1971 when I was 18 years old. :cool:

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1.Moosehead Lake c. 1962 dad, brother and I had not caught a thing to speak of. 

After much pleading I got dad to let me take the boat out myself which was quite understanding considering the size of Moosehead. Came back with lakers and salmon, a few of each. Felt like Gadabout Gaddis.

2. Note to teacher: "Dale won't be in school for a whole as we are going fishing."

signed, Ray

Year later took canoe up the Moose River as far as one can go.(Back then that was out there.) Caught brookie after brookie among the black flies until my ears were sticking straight out.  Dad made me stop, it was that bad. But I was smiling all the while.

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My 13th bday my uncle took me livelineing for stripers. After quite a few small fish and  blue fish my 1st good fish exploded and inhaled my pogie.  We were even treated to him jumping and shaking like a lrg mouth! 38" 28# and a memory that last forever. Thank you uncle Jim, R.I.P

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lots of great fishing stories over the years...some more just special to me.  first this or that - different places, had by me or a friend, spouse, son or daughter.  two stand out equally and are more stereotypical.  both on the cape...a very special place to me my whole lofe.

 

my first bass and my personal best spinning.

 

my first bass - it was 1973 and i was with my dad and his buddies on their boat the nirvana.  we were “about a mile off wood end” trolling squid bars for gbft (squid bars manually made from real squid !).  the outrigher went off and i was the only one down in the cockpit.  my dad yelled “bluefish, go ahead, get in the chair” so i did. (remember fighting chairs ?). my dad’s buddy shep brought me the rod with the fish on, clipped me in, off i went.  10 minutes later i was exhausted and my dad grabbed the line  (old school double line at that point), took a couple steps backwards and his buddy shep hauled a bass over the rail.  no big deal to them, and i tried to keep cool too, but i was sooooo psyched i’d reeled in a big bass !!! :)

 

42 years later, off the backside on November 11, 2015.  there was a “freak” (for november) two day weather window and only a couple boats still chasing school bft.  a buddy had come in early after losing multiple times to “fish on the big side”.  the rumor was that the spinning rod record bft had been got the day before and was beat again earlier that day - several got on spinning that were true giants.  we were out looking for rec sized.  we’d marked some fish near the bottom.   i was using my vs 300 on a terez w/ 100lb power pro w/ a 130lb fluoro leader.  i was trying my special method of jiggin with a larger hook as to hook bait near the bottom and then bring it up a little as an outlier.    almost instantly the rod starts to bend and the reel starts to scream.  “fish on”.  my brother goes to start the boat.  the fish almost immediately turns to the bow and takes off and the line starts going down fast.  my brother guns it trying to keep up (were in our old boat - a 22’ slick craft).  when i was literally down to the last 10-12 meters of line and i was turning around to say “spooled”, the fish makes a fatal mistake... it does a 180 and starts coming strait back at the boat.  i see the line go slack but still moving thru the water and start reeling frantically.  suddenly, we have an almost full spool again(!).  i switch out with my brother and our buddy (3 of us on the boat) takes the wheel and the fisht is on.  nearly three hours later our bighest spinning bft by far... 84”, 400lbs - a legit giant.  btw, it is true the big fish always bights the rod made for the smallest fish.  that 6’9” terez is NOT the right rod for big fish (!)

 

 

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Great that you ask about it here. Here's one I told most of my friends from ages ago..... 21 years to be exact...

 

 

It was my senior high school 'vacation'. My science teacher always bring her graduating seniors to her Maine lake house for a weekend visit. The goal is also to fix their lake side dock from what I was told because somehow it always sank and clumped with weeds.... anyways...

 

My friend and I knew we will have time on the water with the canoe. So I brought my tinny Dawia telescopic 6' rod and some hooks so I can have fun. The next morning before sun up. My friend and I sneaked down to the yard and put on our live vest and drag that canoe down to the water. This is also my first time in a canoe. 

 

So my friend and I paddle out to where ever. No rule, no one cares. We begin fishing with just earth worms (only thing her husband bought) and begin catching yellow pearch, sun fish and few other small non-sense species. But doesn't matter, we were having fun.

 

I started to notice all the action died down for some reason. It was silence. My friend and I didn't talk. 

 

Then it hits, my tinny rod bend over and the tip hit the water. I held on dearly as the canoe rocked back and forth. My friend is screaming at me not to rock the boat but I couldn't help it. I tried to reel up but line kept peeling, boat kept rocking as my friend tries to balance the canoe. Whatever it is was dragging us to the left...... then back to the front and I started to gain lines back. As the 'fish' approach the surface, I grabbed the net with my other hand only to realize it's a freshwater eel. 

 

At this point, I am unable to net the fish. What do I do? 

 

I grabbed the line from the tip of my rod and lift that bastard on board, to the bucket in front of me. But it won't go in. The tail / body if flipping back and forth, it had to be over 3....4 feet long! I was not tall enough to put that tail in to the bucket. After a few struggle, I just left the eel inside the canoe with my rod sitting on top of it. 

 

My friend behind me still trying to recompose from the rocking of the boat while I am staring down the biggest live eel I've ever caught. It had to be 3 inch wide in diameter and 4 feet long. We hurried back to the dock as my teacher already waving us in during our commotion. She was also surprised of the catch. She took a picture while my friend was tall enough to hold it (with the line) lengthwise. 

 

Thus this should be my top memorable catch.

 

Bonus:

 

After we got the fish inside and toss it in a bag, it was time for us to leave also. While the eel was in the bag, we went 2.5 hours of driving, then I got on the train back hope which took another hour. I toss the lifeless bag into the freezer and let my mom took care of it later when she comes back from work. I went to take a nap right after.

 

I heard her scream from the kitchen and woke up a while later (not sure how long). It was from the bag..... that moved in the freezer when she was getting food to prep dinner for us... lol... 

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After working all week ,then fishing round the clock Friday night through Monday morning back in the year of the sand eels  I would have two rods in the wash. It was fall and after getting a hit I would follow the line to see witch way the fish was heading only the line started heading up,up,up into the sky------ with a seaduck hooked on the hook until it ripped or split It's beak and took off.

Talk about scarring the crap out of you . Holy cow!!

the end.

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In 1971 I was 18 years old. I was awarded a trophy for the heaviest striper caught in Maine. I believe it stood for several years. BTW the fish was caught from shore.

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On 4/22/2019 at 1:27 PM, Joe G said:

 

One of my most memorable moments fishing happened about 15 years ago.....around '04 I think it was.   I've related this incident in the past on SOL and some who were around then, may recall it.

 

I was plugging the east turn at the 100 steps at first light.  Blue mackerel Gibbs pencil popper....11' XSRA Lami….Emblem Pro 5500.....30# PP.  I made the cast and as the plug was airborne a Blue Heron came from my right, flew into the loose line and wrapped itself on the braid.  Bird is frantic and starts flapping around and managed to get the line double wrapped around its neck and around one wing.

 

Meanwhile the plug hits the water and current sweeps it close to the developing rip.  The action of the bird causes the plug to dance wildly as it approached the outer edge of the rip, so convincingly so, that a bass exploded on the plug. 

 

The bass started its run east and then went deep.  The line tightened, the bass on one end, me on the other end, with the blue heron hopelessly caught between us.  As I tried to put the breaks on the fish, I see the heron begin to stiffen and its neck lengthen. 

 

Just about this time I hear a woman's voice behind me.  She is on the service road with 3-4 of her elderly friends.  She is yelling for me to release the heron.  That  the bird is a protected specie, that she is a member of the Bourne Audubon Society, that she will report me, ….blah, blah, blah.  

 

Initially, I'm annoyed that I snagged a blue heron, but now I'm angered by this blue-haired PETA type matron scolding me for something beyond my control.

 

Nothing I can do now except to play the fish. The fish continues its run, goes even deeper and pulls the bird under water.  Finally …..I start to gain line.  Sadly for me, the fish breaks off.  The ladies are still watching me and as I begin to retrieve my loose line, the bird comes to the surface.  Its wing is still entangled in the line, however it is decapitated. 

 

The ladies go absolutely berserk.  I calmly explain there is nothing I could have done, but they would have none of that.  Unfortunately, they had placed a call to the BPD and shortly we are joined by two men in blue, lights flashing.  Now I'm the bad guy.  

 

Well, long story short, I'm issued a ticket......interfering with a protected specie or some other such nonsense.  I go to Falmouth District Court, have my say, had friends intervene on my behalf, and fortunately saner minds prevailed and the ticket/charge was dismissed.

 

 

   

Now, THAT is a great fish story!

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Posted (edited) · Report post

My most memorable fish will probably always be this one.

My daughter caught her first striper on a mini-stubby-needle I made for her

In the surf.

 

 

 

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Edited by pogie_boy
fixed it

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My favorite fish are the ones my kids have caught. 

 

Fishing the canal with my son Lincoln and we were into high teens fish for over an hour when I suggested we leave to find bigger fish. We head West and on his first cast, on a custom Lamiglas S-Glass I built for him he hooks his first “big” canal fish. 

 

The current is moving East to West and the fish runs hard East and ends up right at my feet. A guy from Montauk asks my son if he can take a picture with his fish to send to his friends. My son was very proud, as was I. 

 

My son Lincoln casting tins for false albacore in Rhode Island with some great hunting buddies. 

 

My daugter Ava catching her first striper at my grandmothers beach in Buttermilk Bay. 

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this is one of my favorites...my son Garrett with a 23lb bass he caught at the Plymouth jetty when he was 11...using a 6-1/2' ugly stik freshwater rod, 8lb test mono and a 1/4 oz castmaster...all i did was lift the fish out of the water for him...

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

So it was June and I'd been catching good fish all week in the evenings but always timing it so I'd be at a certain shallow reef just as the rip set-up downtide. The trick was to get close enough to drop the anchor on top of the ledge itself without getting sucked up onto it in the back-eddy. Of course the 9 foot oar could push the Westpointer back into the flow but it was slick if you didn't have to untie the oar because the old sweep did double duty as a horizontal rod rack under the side deck......I just lashed the 2 rods on top of the oar with some seine twine and a slippery hitch to keep them from jumping around on the choppy run downriver. After that the fishing was a sure thing - just sling the fly over the transom and work it back in the current. The only challenge was getting the snake fly down past the schoolies. Easiest thing was to grab the 7/8 weight with the sink tip line that was tied on top of the 10 weight but to get the 30"+ bass you had to untie both rods to get to that 10 weight with a 400 grain fast sinking head. Other than that it had been like clockwork all week but by Friday night I just had to show somebody so I begged my wife to come along. She wasn't interested in fishing....I promised sunsets.....she wasn't interested.....I begged her because I knew no one would ever believe my stories if I didn't have her as my witness.

Finally she gave in for a short boat ride and NO fishing except just one bass to show her how incredible the week had been and how crazy this spot was. Of course I grabbed the 7/8 weight right on top to be quick about it but she wasn't impressed by the 26 incher caught on the first cast (yawn - "can we go home now?").

Resigning myself that I'd promised only "one fish" I pulled the anchor line back too fast and wound up drifting up over the reef in that back eddy.

Bending over quickly to untie the 10 weight to reach the oar beneath it so I could fend us off, I suddenly had my most brilliant idea ever. Instead of untying the oar I just got the 10 weight free and threw a quick cast back at the rip (snake fly was already tied on as always).

Sure enough I hooked up immediately on a bigger fish and just stepped aft to put a nice bend in the rod and to let the fish tow the 20 foot Westpointer backwards off the reef. My wife only complained that I'd promised "ONE fish" while I made excuses that I only hooked it so it could help us avoid running aground.

She remained so un-impressed that I just had to call my out-of-state striper fishing buddy to tell him the story of how I was now using fish as beasts of burden. He said something rude and hung up.

Edited by KennebecJake

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On 5/4/2019 at 10:05 AM, ged said:

My favorite fish are the ones my kids have caught. 

What's Lincoln's Username on SOL? lol

 

Can't wait to share similar experiences with my son.  We'll have to wait a few years, he's only two!  Sure is great to do what we enjoy so much, even more with the ones we love.  GREAT JOB!

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1 hour ago, Dedeale said:

What's Lincoln's Username on SOL? lol

 

Can't wait to share similar experiences with my son.  We'll have to wait a few years, he's only two!  Sure is great to do what we enjoy so much, even more with the ones we love.  GREAT JOB!

He does Instagram and Facebook. I don’t do either :)

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