Fishy Fisher

Pool deck

Rate this topic

25 posts in this topic

Wife wants an above ground pool. Pool = deck. I live in town of Hempstead, Nassau cty, LI. I haven't decided whether to get a permit or not but i definitely want to be in compliance. What are the general rules for decks? I looked online a little but couldn't find anything specific. I have 2 basic questions: 

 

1) what are setback requirements, if any? 

2) can i use those precast piers that sit on the ground instead of pouring post footings? 

 

I'm basically thinking that someday it will either be legalized or ripped out so in either case i want to make it as easy as possible. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First of all with any style pool of permanent style structure have it inspected. Couple things come up with regards to problems related to no inspections, neighbors are the big one. One will call the township, next is the township drives around neighborhoods. You will have more problems when caught and fines related to it at hundreds per day until the violation is taken care of. Next, will be the harda$$ a township will be on you after the fact. They will delay any approval of plans and during that time fines add up. 

 

Biggest one is an accident. Your ins will not cover you and protect you if someone is hurt and worse electrocuted. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely not worried about neighbors. I have good ones, thank God. 

 

Pool permit is not required if in compliance, according to the pool salesman. LOL, i can see the eyes rolling already. :wee: But if i permit the deck, of course I'd do the pool simultaneously. 

 

Fines are not hundreds $ per day here. They are a multiple of the permit fee, so it's a few hundred bucks with no chance of adding up to thousands and millions. 

 

And im not worried about getting anyone electrocuted. Or accidents from failing railings or anything like that. I know how to build stuff safe & sturdy. 

 

Really i just want to make sure I'm in compliance. The town publishes pool regulations (setbacks, fences, overhead wires, splash alarm), so that was easy, but finding information about the deck setbacks and foundation requirements has not worked out yet. 

 

The deck will be free standing and not connected to the house or any other structure. That's another reason i want to go with above ground precast piers. If they move a little, who cares? Soil here is very good bearing. Sand with small rocks & pebbles just under topsoil. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, John E said:

See below from the TOH website. See #5 under requirements.  I'd bet you will need a permit and not just "be in compliance".  Give the Building Department a call and ask for the inspector in your area.  They were helpful to me in the past when we did our pool.  The inspector actually sat down with me for a few minutes to go the list of items he would be looking for to sign off on the permit.  The pool company did my permit application but I closed it out as I needed another one for the additional fencing and a shed relocation.  You will need to have an electrical inspection (outside company) if they run lines to the pump and any other accessories you may have installed. And, the county assessor will be next in line to check the pool so they can tax you if it adds value. 

I'd also check with my insurance agent to see if you need to notify them as they may not cover you if something happens to or involves the pool.

BTW, it's not your adjacent neighbors you have to worry about, it's the ones down the block.  I had the inspector to my house several times when they were digging the pool out.  Neighbors were calling for anything ranging from ratting us out for an illegal pool installation (mind you, everything was permitted and ok) to complaining there was too much dirt in the street while the dump truck was being loaded.   

 

https://hempsteadny.gov/permits-and-applications/above-ground-pool

Above Ground Pool

Filing Instructions

All above ground swimming pool applications shall include the following information:

  1. A completed building permit application form.
  2. Three copies of a recent complete (unaltered) survey.
  3. Two copies of the subject plot plan indicating the required fence enclosure height and location, pool size, shape, location and all remaining dimensions (setbacks) from the pool to the property lines.
  4. Two sketches of the pool that indicate size, depth and type of construction.
  5. Two copies of the above ground pool affidavit.
  6. A Certificate of Workers Compensation or exemption thereof.

Requirements for Swimming Pools

  1. Pool must be located in the rear yard.
  2. A four (4) foot setback or more is required to the property line.
  3. Pool equipment is also required to maintain at least a four (4) foot setback to the property line.
  4. A setback of a minimum of ten (10) feet horizontally is required from all overhead wires.
  5. Standing towers, platforms, or freestanding decks are required to be within the four (4) foot setback.
  6. In the case of a corner lot, the pool must be no closer than ten (10) feet from any line along an abutting street.
  7. All pools are required to maintain an enclosure by means of a railing, fencing or in the case of a hot tub, a locked safety cover.
  8. Fencing is required to be a minimum of five (5) and a maximum of six (6) feet, with self-latching and self-closing gates. Fencing is required to adhere to all regulations as stated in the Town Of Hempstead Building Zone Ordinance according to zone.
  9. Fencing in Residence A, AA, A1, A2, B, BB, BA, and C zones may not for further than the rear of their neighbor's house toward the street.
  10. Fencing in a Residence LPRD zone may not go further than the front building line toward the street.
  11. In all Residence zones, fencing when used as a pool enclosure must be non-climbable, Stockade or PVC fencing shall have all horizontal members facing the pool. Chain link fencing may not have mesh larger than 2.25 square inches or may have privacy slats.
  12. In the case of a dwelling wall used as part of the enclosure, any door opening into the pool area shall be equipped with an alarm with an audible warning, which shall sound continuously for a minimum of thirty (30) seconds when the door is open.
  13. ANY LOT WHICH IS LOCATED ON A CORNER SHOULD CONSULT WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS PLAN EXAMINER'S OFFICE IN REGARDS TO THE PROPER LOCATION OF A POOL AND/OR FENCE. CONTACT (516) 489-5000, EXT. 3073.
  14. The New York State Uniform Fire Prevention and Building Code requires that all swimming pools be equipped with an approved pool alarm. (See requirements in Splash Alarms).

Notes

The application is a sworn statement. Anyone knowingly entering false information thereon may be guilty of a criminal offense. All information must be typed or printed, cross outs may void the application.

REQUIRED FENCE ENCLOSURE refers to restricted access as indicated in chapter 134 of the Code of the Town of Hempstead. A fence enclosure, access gates, etc. are also required under the provisions of the New York State Uniform Fire Prevention and Building Code, Appendix G.

ELECTRICAL - All electrical work must comply with Article 680 of the National Electric Code, and an Electrical Inspection Certificate must be submitted prior to the issuance of a Certificate of Completion.

PLUMBING - A vacuum breaker is required, which may be installed by the property owner.

It is the policy of this department to abandon and destroy, without notification, any application that has been left dormant by the owner or agent thereof for 90 days. All fees paid in relation to such application will be non-refundable and non-transferable.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. I actually read that before but I missed the deck setback. Good to know. Any idea about the prefab piers? Or is it simply up to me to decide? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a 15x30 oval above ground for almost 20 years, ~40" high aluminum deck came with the pool as an option.  The supports rested right on the ground, never had an issue.  You climbed a pool ladder to reach the deck, ladder pivoted up for safety.  Here's a reference pic, ours was oval, we called it the Queen Mary with all the side rails, looked like a boat.  

 

pool deck.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One comment about permits, coworker skipped all the legal formalities until he tried to sell his house.  That's when they caught up to him for the pool, electric, and improperly fastened deck to his house.  Pay me now or pay me later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Fishy Fisher said:

Thanks. I actually read that before but I missed the deck setback. Good to know. Any idea about the prefab piers? Or is it simply up to me to decide? 

Sorry, I don't about the prefab piers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regional differences again. I built three above ground pool decks in the Mt. Airy N.C. area a buncha years ago. Them little precast 4 x 4 post footers were the norm and code there. Never seen them fly here in Jersey. Although, I don't see why they would't be acceptable given the "move-able" structure.

 

Anyway Fishy, ya gots four foot from yer property line :)

 

Here's the biggest one I built,

I used some 8" x 12" x 12" concrete blocks that I found at Tractor Supply for the outside posts, just because it was so much bigger.. And then maybe 18 of them little footers for all the under supports. 

 

 

900x900px-LL-15ec904a_ararat_002.jpg

900x900px-LL-39a055ae_ararat_005.jpg

900x900px-LL-c07d59e7_ararat_003.jpg

900x900px-LL-c3e40da3_ararat_001.jpg

900x900px-LL-46fe6ddf_ararat_007.jpg

900x900px-LL-d87d298d_ararat_015.jpg

900x900px-LL-a4e85988_ararat_013.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ben Lippen said:

Regional differences again. I built three above ground pool decks in the Mt. Airy N.C. area a buncha years ago. Them little precast 4 x 4 post footers were the norm and code there. Never seen them fly here in Jersey. Although, I don't see why they would't be acceptable given the "move-able" structure.

 

Anyway Fishy, ya gots four foot from yer property line :)

 

Here's the biggest one I built,

I used some 8" x 12" x 12" concrete blocks that I found at Tractor Supply for the outside posts, just because it was so much bigger.. And then maybe 18 of them little footers for all the under supports. 

 

 

900x900px-LL-15ec904a_ararat_002.jpg

900x900px-LL-39a055ae_ararat_005.jpg

900x900px-LL-c07d59e7_ararat_003.jpg

900x900px-LL-c3e40da3_ararat_001.jpg

900x900px-LL-46fe6ddf_ararat_007.jpg

900x900px-LL-d87d298d_ararat_015.jpg

900x900px-LL-a4e85988_ararat_013.jpg

Nice job on that. Those decks aren’t easy to do especially up here when you figure in all the supports, digging, cement etc. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

2 hours ago, Ben Lippen said:

If you can put in them heli-coils. That'll save ya a ton of work and money.

 

Ya lost me.... where?

 

Nice work there 

Edited by nightfighter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Ben Lippen said:

If you can put in them heli-coils. That'll save ya a ton of work and money.

 

Wooo... not here. At least not in NYC. I just built a doctor's office in Brooklyn with a concrete handicap ramp outside. Holy shemoly what a nightmare. Mostly caused by the structural engineer who we ended up firing, which is not an easy task because it's hard to find a willing replacement. He wanted to put spread footings even with the building's footings (about 15' deep) which was insane because of the site conditions right next to a busy sidewalk. Insane even without the busy sidewalk. I wanted to substitute helical piles. They eliminate a lot of risk that comes with deep excavation and they're a hell of a lot cheaper. But the guy was pissed that we exposed his awful design so he took it out on us. He wanted all kinds of special inspections, he totally ignored the manufacturer spec for installation and pulled some custom garbage drawing off the internet further cementing his reputation as a doofus, he wanted a pull test which was impossible due to the site conditions (not enough room), not to mention the job had only 7 piles to begin with and a pull test requires at least 4 more to form the jack brace. Total nightmare and believe me this story is just a taste. To top it off, he never asked for a boring - I did that - and we found out we could have put spread footing under the frost line and the soil would bear great. 

 

All this for a glorified front porch. What a waste of time, energy and money. 

 

I actually got the idea for helical piles from watching a deck installation video. I had no idea they were used for that but it makes so much sense, especially if you have a lot of footings. They get a lot cheaper in volume. The material cost is low. It's the setup you pay for. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.