BrianBM

Lyme and other tick diseases, pyrethrin and Gore-TEx

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It's tick season and we need to be careful. If you're out of doors, you make use (I hope) of pyrethrin on outdoor clothing, etc.

 

Does anyone know if it damages Gore-Tex or other breathable fabrics in waders?

 

Speaking purely for myself, I'd rather shorten the life of my waders with Pyrethrin then endure a siege of Lyme disease, but that's me.  YMMV.  There are lots of other tick-borne diseases that are spreading north with warming, too, and I can do without a bout with any of them. (Just had a long earful from a horticulturalist about the effects of climate change.) I don't know what the effect of pyrethrin on breathable fabric may be; someone here may know already. If Simms responds to an inquiry, I'll post their comment here, too. 

 

 

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My son is going threw his second bout of Lyme. He’s a deer hunter and being in the woods a lot can’t get away from it. He is just about ready to give up hunting and stay on the water. 

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Brian, I think what you're looking for is Permethrin, not Pyrethrin.  They are similar, but Permethrin is a synthetic version.  

 

As one of the lucky Chronic Lyme recipients, I now use Permethrin on everything.  According to the website, it has no ill affect on clothing, and I haven't noticed any damage to my clothes/tent.  

 

Might be worth checking if it should be used on waders though, because apparently it can harm fish.  I would assume that's before it dries, but I am not positive.  

"Permethrin will not damage clothes or equipment. Unlike DEET, which may harm some fabrics and materials, Permethrin is compatible for use even on fragile fabrics such as silk, plus all synthetics and waterproof membrane fabrics. Permethrin will not affect plastics or finishes. IF IN DOUBT, try a sample on an obscure surface area, especially on delicates and check it after 24 hours of exposure.

 

Sawyer® Permethrin Insect Repellent is odorless, non-greasy and non-staining after it dries. Permethrin can be harmful to aquatic creatures such as fish, so do not spray Permethrin around fish aquariums."

Edited by TLap21

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Permethrin if it's the same one I read up on a while back is supposed to be toxic to cats. As I recall they said to bag your treated clothing and leave outside the residence. 

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Ivery seen ticks crawl right over premethrein.  

 

I've just noticed a tick or two survive a wash and dry cycle.

 

If you love the places you fish.  Besides picking up trash, bring some hand clippers and trim branches along the path.  I do it up here in Albany ways.

 

Got like 30 ticks on my clothes April 1st for trout opener.

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2 hours ago, TLap21 said:

rian, I think what you're looking for is Permethrin, not Pyrethrin.  They are similar, but Permethrin is a synthetic version.  

correct

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14 mins ago, salt deficient said:

Ivery seen ticks crawl right over premethrein.  

 

 

There are many gov funded tests and i have done several myself.  I;ve done blot and stripe tests on fabric with permethrin, deet, as well as silly things like avonproducts, and Permthrin is as effective a tick deterrent as there is available for use near humans.   

 

It is very bad for aquatic macroinvertebrates, so keep it out of water.

 

 

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I use pyrethrin on our farm in the form of a pesticide called Pyganics. It is organic and is made from chrysanthemums. I know it is labeled for use on livestock for ticks but probably not for humans. It is also and oil which I cant imagine would be good around any adhesive 

Edited by fishing addict

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13 hours ago, BrianBM said:

It's tick season and we need to be careful. If you're out of doors, you make use (I hope) of pyrethrin on outdoor clothing, etc.

 

Does anyone know if it damages Gore-Tex or other breathable fabrics in waders?

 

Speaking purely for myself, I'd rather shorten the life of my waders with Pyrethrin then endure a siege of Lyme disease, but that's me.  YMMV.  There are lots of other tick-borne diseases that are spreading north with warming, too, and I can do without a bout with any of them. (Just had a long earful from a horticulturalist about the effects of climate change.) I don't know what the effect of pyrethrin on breathable fabric may be; someone here may know already. If Simms responds to an inquiry, I'll post their comment here, too. 

 

 

Why in the world would you spray your waders? They are a closed system. Ticks would have to climb all the way up to your chest to reach skin.

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There's a particular place I want to fish that requires a hike through a tick-filled vine jungle.  I'll be wearing a surf top, too, nothing exposed but nose and face and hands. The location is one that guarantees that they'll land on top of your head. 

 

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Permethrin on your clothes is the way to go. It repels and kills ticks. The military has been using it since the 90’s. I have several Columbia hooded long sleeve shirts that I treat with Permethrin and it really keeps the mosquitoes away. I also treat my pants socks and hats. I see no need to treat waders and it’s dangerous to aquatic creatures so you really shouldn’t do it anyway. Better to treat the clothes you wear under them. It does not harm breathable fabrics. For added protection when wearing my breathables I use Picaridin spray on face, hair and hands. I never use deet when wearing breathable membranes. If you must use deet, spray it on areas that won’t come in contact with your waders before you put them on. 

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+1 for Permethrin.

 

I bought some concentrated liquid two or three years ago because it was the most cost-effective approach IMO. 

 

(I have no experience with the sprays.)

 

Diluted it according to directions. then soaked my clothing in it.  Hung them in the shade to dry for a day or so.  (IIRC, drying them in sunlight decreases the effectiveness.)  

 

Never saw the need to apply it to waders, shells, etc.

 

My results/observations:

 

1.  I found the odor to be very strong when using it according to directions.  Running the clothing through the washing machine in a short/gentle cycle, then hanging them to dry (again, in the shade) made a huge difference in the smell.  (Most vendors claim that the treatment lasts for six launderings.)

 

2.  In the at least two seasons of traipsing around in tick-infested areas (various spots on the Cape, Gooseberry Island in Westport, etc.) I haven't seen a single tick on my skin, and none on my clothing.  (I check VERY carefully after every time out.) 

 

Note that these results were the same for both the "non-post-treatment wash" and the "post-treatment wash".

 

3.  I perhaps laundered my treated fishing clothing four times or so in the course of a fishing season.  No impact on effectiveness; they still worked fine.  FWIW, I washed them separately from other clothing.

 

(Sounds horrible to some of you, I'll wager.  I have at least ten fishing shirts and four or five pairs of pants, all of which I keep solely for fishing/hiking/bushwhacking.)  

 

4.  This season, I'll try soaking some clothing in twice the recommended dilution.  (I.e., half as strong.)

 

HTH

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I have been using permethrin for years shore fishing our tick infested freshwater reservoirs. It was not uncommon to find 30-50 ticks per angler any give night. And I can say it is absolutely effective.

 

Some things to remember tho:

-Its not repellent.. It kills ticks within a few seconds of contact. It will also kill most other insects (mosquitos) that land on you as well. Your not only protecting yourself, but every other person that tick may have infected.

-Its bad for cats.

-Despite what manufacturers say. It loses its effectiveness with every wash. I have read and also seen this in my own use. I have a "shore fishing" outfit (hat, shirt, socks, pants, boots, pack) that i treat with permethrin and only wash it when i absolutely have to.

 

 

 

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