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BrianBM

Follow-up to Ultimate Fish Care thread

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A poster in the Cooking Your Catch forum noted that he brined his fillets before smoking.  I wonder if it would be worth brining fillets as a matter of course, especially if they have been over-exposed to fresh water? 

 

Anyone doing that?

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10 mins ago, BrianBM said:

A poster in the Cooking Your Catch forum noted that he brined his fillets before smoking.  I wonder if it would be worth brining fillets as a matter of course, especially if they have been over-exposed to fresh water? 

 

Anyone doing that?

When out on the water we soak them in the clean salt water and then place right on the ice or ice slurry in bags . Added salt brine during the smoking process builds in the flavor of its own to the fish. Jessica would be a great one here to really answer the question , she has experimented with all sorts of Salt Water fish and preparing them for the smoker.

 

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Brian, 

I smoke fish in a regular basis. I just smoke trout 2 weeks ago and have another batch going in the smoker Mon.

Brining serves a couple purposes. Most fish brines contain salt, sugar, and some spices if choice. Often garlic powder, soy sauce, black pepper and bay leaf. 

In the old days heavy brining was necessary since smoking was a method of preserving food due to lack of refrigeration. Salt was a preservative.

Now some salt is used to draw out excess moisture to hasten the smoking process and extend shelf life in the refrigerator. Brines are noticeably lighter and less salty.

Here's some recent trout.

 

 

 

20190409_172545.jpg

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When I next get to the Cape, I'll give you a call. If there's a stray smoked fish around, I'd like a nibble, and see if I want to follow your example. 

 

I had to pass on the Mike Oliver / RJ spring fly trip to the Cape this year, the legs just aren't adequate for more than brief walking. I hope that will improve for September. 

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The "brine" used for smoking is much much different from any "brine" you might think about routinely using on fish the aren't destined to be smoked.

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On 4/20/2019 at 9:22 PM, BrianBM said:

No doubt it is.

 

Still no answer to my question, as posted.  Anyone care to comment?

I tried it and just way to salty of a taste.

even when i smoke my fish i do not use any salt.I use soy sauce  and that has all the salt you need.

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9 mins ago, hotfishgirl said:

I tried it and just way to salty of a taste.

even when i smoke my fish i do not use any salt.I use soy sauce  and that has all the salt you need.

I agree. I'm starting to lean in that direction. The only reason I still use salt is,  soy sauce can overpower the delicate flavor of trout.

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29 mins ago, bob_G said:

I agree. I'm starting to lean in that direction. The only reason I still use salt is,  soy sauce can overpower the delicate flavor of trout.

i use low sodium soy sauce for trout,eels,mackerel,came out much better.

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