R.R. Bridge Fisher

Fishing moon tides during peak current

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How many of you fish the current at its peak during moon tides? Using heavy jigs getting one possibly two bounces before cranking your jig in.

This is a lot of work but i believe the fish are willing to eat.

As i get older this method gets harder and i seem to back off during the peak.

What yee say?

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RRBF,

i rarely miss the opportunity to fish on moon tides.  The fast tides really move bait and hungry fish.

I rarely fish the fast running mid tide stage. As you said, its often too much work. I'll fish the last 3 hours, right down to low tide. Beginning with 3oz and dropping down in half ounce increments until low tide. I often use a 1oz jig on the final stage of a tide.

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1 hour ago, bob_G said:

RRBF,

i rarely miss the opportunity to fish on moon tides.  The fast tides really move bait and hungry fish.

I rarely fish the fast running mid tide stage. As you said, its often too much work. I'll fish the last 3 hours, right down to low tide. Beginning with 3oz and dropping down in half ounce increments until low tide. I often use a 1oz jig on the final stage of a tide.

:th:

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On 4/14/2019 at 8:15 AM, R.R. Bridge Fisher said:

How many of you fish the current at its peak during moon tides? Using heavy jigs getting one possibly two bounces before cranking your jig in.

This is a lot of work but i believe the fish are willing to eat.

As i get older this method gets harder and i seem to back off during the peak.

What yee say?

You're so correct. I'd like to be out there tonight doing that work!! I'm getting a bit long in the tooth though for much of that 6 and 7/8 oz.stuff!!! But 2/3 hours before low, to two/three after low seems to work 3/4/5 oz. All good, whatever works to catch fish sounds good to me.

Edited by Deep Hole

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On 4/14/2019 at 8:15 AM, R.R. Bridge Fisher said:

How many of you fish the current at its peak during moon tides? Using heavy jigs getting one possibly two bounces before cranking your jig in.

This is a lot of work but i believe the fish are willing to eat.

As i get older this method gets harder and i seem to back off during the peak.

What yee say?

In another time fishing the peak moon tides meant using up to 6 ounces, even an 8 on occasion.  to stay on or near the bottom. More water was moving , thus you had a faster flow of water. It changed the way you presented what you were using to a point where one had to overcompensate to catch a few fish. This meant that you needed a rod and reel to handle this extra weight during those times when you had the full moon tidal currents . We always spent a full 8 hours fishing as a normal trip .especially when jigging. Those who were unable to cast the heavier jigs went home because they were not able to get into the hole where the fish were sitting or selectively fished a part of the change once the velocity of the water slowed down.

Fishing around the bridges seem to have a slight difference in the speed of the current from some back wash action  Many times you only saw a few of us that were prepared to fish these types of current conditions. One could selectively fish the current changes with much lighter jigs, but for those who were prepared the whole current change was your oyster.  It is much harder to fish and that is why having a leather pouch to set your rod in can make al the difference in the world , especially when you hang a fish of size.

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On 4/14/2019 at 8:15 AM, R.R. Bridge Fisher said:

How many of you fish the current at its peak during moon tides?

Every May - October. I fish a whole tide then a hour or two into the tide change.

 

I start off with 3oz right after the turn. I move up to 4 oz about 45 minutes - 1 hour after the turn. I use 5 or 6 oz during the strongest part of the the tide. Then I back down to 4 and 3oz as the tide heads towards the next slack. 5 oz usually gets me to the bottom for a few bounces on the bottom. Some deep holes I'll use 6 oz. As along as the wind isn't riping, getting to the bottom during moon tides isn't that hard. It's a lot of work however.

Edited by zak-striper

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1 hour ago, zak-striper said:

Every May - October. I fish a whole tide then a hour or two into the tide change.

 

I start off with 3oz right after the turn. I move up to 4 oz about 45 minutes - 1 hour after the turn. I use 5 or 6 oz during the strongest part of the the tide. Then I back down to 4 and 3oz as the tide heads towards the next slack. 5 oz usually gets me to the bottom for a few bounces on the bottom. Some deep holes I'll use 6 oz. As along as the wind isn't riping, getting to the bottom during moon tides isn't that hard. It's a lot of work however.

That's a lot of work zak. Shortening your casts, and using slimmer profile jigs will sometimes give you the ability to use lighter jigs. I never use anything over 4oz, and drop down to 3oz asap. 2oz is my fav weight. But I don't know where you fish, so conditions may dictate a heavy jig.

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1 hour ago, bob_G said:

That's a lot of work zak. Shortening your casts, and using slimmer profile jigs will sometimes give you the ability to use lighter jigs. I never use anything over 4oz, and drop down to 3oz asap. 2oz is my fav weight. But I don't know where you fish, so conditions may dictate a heavy jig.

I fish some deeper holes along the canal. I increase the weight as I stop losing contact with the bottom. When I go from 3 to 4 or 4 to 5, I can feel the bottom bounce resume with the heavier weight.  I like to jig tight to the bottom mid-tide, looking for bass hiding in holes or behind structure.  And if there's any wind, I need those 5 or 6 oz jigs in order to get the jig on the bottom during my drift so I can feel the bottom and any hits. 

 

Around slack I'm throwing Savages or poppers or SP minnows/stick baits more than sluggos on jigs.

Edited by zak-striper

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3 hours ago, zak-striper said:

Every May - October. I fish a whole tide then a hour or two into the tide change.

 

I start off with 3oz right after the turn. I move up to 4 oz about 45 minutes - 1 hour after the turn. I use 5 or 6 oz during the strongest part of the the tide. Then I back down to 4 and 3oz as the tide heads towards the next slack. 5 oz usually gets me to the bottom for a few bounces on the bottom. Some deep holes I'll use 6 oz. As along as the wind isn't riping, getting to the bottom during moon tides isn't that hard. It's a lot of work however.

Zak it is only by trying different set ups and experimenting do you find the where for all to fish the whole tide. Some never learn how to or care not, but get locked into set patterns for s specific period of time during a tide change they feel comfortable fishing at all. You are correct it is work and also determination to find fish in situations that also require that work to be successful. . It is however very rewarding, when after fishing the extremely part of the change that most give up, because they are not prepared to catch fish of a life time , you can go home with  a smile knowing that you had the patients, fortitude  and skill to outlast the fish gods.

Edited by Angler #1

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I tend to back off on fishing max current since I typically fish the deep water areas and am not a big fan of tossing 6+ oz. Granted I could try to more aerodynamic jigs as is recommended above and I am also likely missing some of the larger fish that are hugging the bottom at max flow. 

I do still try to cast as much as I can, if I'm in an area where people have stopped fishing as I'm still hoping to catch fish that may be sitting higher in the water column, that or I try to do a 10 or 2 pm cast rather than a 11 or 12 o clock cast that way I am still getting down to the bottom partway through the drift.

May try to see what is out there for different jig shapes, I've also moved away from bucktails in favor of paddle tails due to the success, however I may go back to bucktails with sparse hair during max current as I find they tend to get to the bottom much faster than even an aerodynamic jig head/body combo. 

 

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12 hours ago, Searobin said:

I tend to back off on fishing max current since I typically fish the deep water areas and am not a big fan of tossing 6+ oz. Granted I could try to more aerodynamic jigs as is recommended above and I am also likely missing some of the larger fish that are hugging the bottom at max flow. 

I do still try to cast as much as I can, if I'm in an area where people have stopped fishing as I'm still hoping to catch fish that may be sitting higher in the water column, that or I try to do a 10 or 2 pm cast rather than a 11 or 12 o clock cast that way I am still getting down to the bottom partway through the drift.

May try to see what is out there for different jig shapes, I've also moved away from bucktails in favor of paddle tails due to the success, however I may go back to bucktails with sparse hair during max current as I find they tend to get to the bottom much faster than even an aerodynamic jig head/body combo. 

 

Sea Robin the profile of the jig you use can determine how fast it gets to the bottom and when the moon tides strike that is key as well as the extra weight . If you are using a paddle tail on the jig that will have a tendency to float it down , if it ever does hit during those ripping moon tides where the current is super fast and strong. Your casting technique to over compensate for this ride to the bottom is also one way to reach the bottom as well. Also by allowing the reel to stay in free spool till it hits bottom is also another way to over compensate . It can be done my friend and by experimenting with different jig profiles [one to consider is the diamond jig with a single hook ] If your mind is open to change then you will find success.  By getting into a one way approach, it is like the old horses pulling a wagon with blinders on they never can see the whole view of what is available to see as they trot down the road . By limiting yourself to being a one way fishermen you will also limit yourself to how well you learn the ways of the fish you seek.

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Thanks Carl, always appreciate feedback and suggestions. I haven’t spent as much time fishing the Ava’s or trying to switch things up when the bite is slow so definitely need to remember to stop banging my head against the wall sometimes.

 

I am also interested in what each of you expect for fish behavior AT slack (not either side of slack). This is generally my least productive time as I’m typically getting jigs hung up even at 1-2 oz. I like the water moving but am wondering if anyone has success when there isn’t much water movement.

 

From reading some perspectives, some think fish use the slack to try to re-position, but I would think without the aid of some moving water the fish are waiting more for the current to move and bring food and/or give more of a competitive advantage. Maybe scrounging around the bottom for crabs and lobsters at those times? 

 

Edited by Searobin

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Sea Robin we also like to fish the current changes when the water is moving. However saying that at times once you have located the deeper holes and early back washes fishing slack can also have its rewards, just as you have found out losing gear is a given. You can change up how you fish the jig and attempt to work it a little higher in the column, , use lees weight, find the sandy bottom locations if you plan on draging the bottom, 

That is why experimenting with each location you fish by fishing those plus tides to the minus is paramount in attempting to understand if you find the fish doing something else at those low end slack . I do not why , but I often used this time to search out the deeper holes along a stretgh of the canal, so as the water filled it in I was able to determine when and where to be standing to get into a good spot. Fishing a particular hole also meant that you did not always fish from the same location to slide into it ,'

A few feet one or the other at times could mean the difference and at time overcompensating with the casting the jig and how far up current you hit the water would find the jig getting into the depression you were fishing was important and other times taking a walk from your normal location as the water increased in speed and gained some height was also important.

Just keep a good mental log on how and where you position yourself and the weight of the jig and also the style you use .

We have no experts that fish the canal that have all of its secrets it holds , even after 75 years of fishing it I would like to think that I am still learning the hows and why we are successful and why we are not at times.

Using your powers of observations when in a line with others also fishing and seeing how and what others are doing can help you at another time cause you to check out another spot that may have been only a few feet or more from you the next time.

That is why i always attempted to fish the whole current change during much of my life fishing from the beach or the canal . The information you gain will help you later in life better understand the ways of King Neptune's Secrets and make you a better informed fisherman overall.

The time you put in when you can do it has its own rewards later on. Do not become a one dimensional fishermen , listen to what others may say , but in the end it will be yourself that will decide the fate of your thought process for the day you decide to actually go fishing. Experiment Experiment and put in the time the rewards are worth the effort.    Good fortunes

Edited by Angler #1

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