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Stripers breeding in NH/ME waters

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Guy at work says the fish working they're way up are going to breed or the hold overs breed here.  I told him I would start a thread and let you guys tell him.  I said if they do breed up here it aint many and they are just following the bait.  Feel free to give me your .02 and I will make sure he reads this.  Thanks.

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First I've ever heard about it.  I've always been under the impression they breed in the Chesapeake and Hudson and migrate up here, chasing bait as you say. 

 

 

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depends on the area, there is an ongoing documentation of spawning fish in the Kennebec. http://www.cca-maine.org/files/maine_stripers.pdf, now that the Penobscot is being restored I hope that we can establish our own healthy breeding stock in Maine. Might be the best bet for having these fish around in years to come.

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The sad thing is that before the industrial revolution caused rivers to be damned for power, virtually every mid-large river in New England had breeding populations of stripers AND salmon...

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A biologist at a ram n the Merrimack told me there is a small population that breed in the river. I am sure it happens in some of other rivers as well in the NE. 

 

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Thanks guys. I figure there maybe be some breeding but the guy was talking about all the fish coming up are coming here to breed.

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I bet spawns happen in many rivers, but are unsuccessful...the eggs need to be suspended 3-5 days, without exposure to saltwater. I often wonder if some fertilized eggs make it by sheer luck. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

19 hours ago, Livefreeordie said:

I bet spawns happen in many rivers, but are unsuccessful...the eggs need to be suspended 3-5 days, without exposure to saltwater. I often wonder if some fertilized eggs make it by sheer luck. 

The "suspension" part is the key to this "Goldilocks" scenario in which you need both salt and fresh water.  If conditions are "Just Right," the fertilized eggs slowly sink to the bottom and are gently moved along by the current as they develop  If the water density is too high, e.g. too much salt water, they float and get washed out of the river.  If the density to too low, e.g. too much fresh water because of a recent rainstorm, the fertilized eggs sink immediately to the bottom, get covered with silt and suffocate.

 

 

Edited by Roccus7

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There is a massive spawning population in Canada.  No reason they could not spawn elsewhere in New England if their historical rivers were opened up again. 

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3 hours ago, stripedbassking said:

Possible but probably unlikely of any consistency 

 

3 hours ago, stripedbassking said:

Would be great if they migrated up here to spawn then they’d be safe from the gauntlet of over harvesting 

Highly unlikely.  Part of the reproduction of striped bass is for them to winter relatively close or even within the estuary they will breed in so any "migration" prior to spawning is limited to leaving the close by ocean to go up the river to spawn.  The Canadian fish are strewn in the St. Lawrence River system's mouth and there are fish that winter in the spawning rivers, providing ice fishing opportunities.  Another example is the Kennebec, where in the 1800s before the damming of the river, folks would cut through the ice in Dresden to gig stripers.

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On 4/9/2019 at 0:38 PM, Roccus7 said:

The sad thing is that before the industrial revolution caused rivers to be damned for power, virtually every mid-large river in New England had breeding populations of stripers AND salmon...

Very true, in fact the New England striper population dipped so much in the late 1800s after the industrial revolution that famous New England striper clubs basically shut down due to lack of fish, the theory is that after that the chessy and Hudson fish learned to

migrate to New England to fill the void 

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