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mikez2

Chains, the Rodney Dangerfield of fish

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34 posts in this topic

14 hours ago, Ditchbag said:

The yellow part?

yeah include the two fins near the belly (pectoral?) with the belly strip (maybe 2 inches or so)... 

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16 hours ago, R.R. Bridge Fisher said:

That one pond with the beach doesn't appear to have access but the bigger one accross the way is a pickeral spot for sure. 

What's your biggest largemouth from there? 

You'd be surprised. My biggest was only 4lbs. A few reasons. When I was fishing it, I was only a kid.  My tackle and lure selection was dubious at best. I only had a few crappy rubber worms, a hulla popper and jitterbug. But I saw enormous fish. I knew right where they lived. Just didn't have the skills or the tackle to catch them. Often wondered what became of them?

As for the other pond with the beach. Parking is allowed on the park road leading in. No one has ice fished that pond in 20 years.  If you're reluctant to park on the park road,  you can always park in my yard.

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Pickerel in the northeast are the Chuck Norris of freshwater fish!

 

They eat whatever they want, attack without notice, and fight with all their energy...

They are the first fish in the spring and the last in the fall when you want to catch a fish.

 

Oh, and will bite you or slice you in a heart beat!

 

The bigger they are, the more selective they can be, but eventually they will all want to attack a lure!

 

I've had them launch themselves out of the water and hit my lure and even my kayak on a number of trips.

I've gotten them with a fish half way down the throat and still hitting my lure.

 

It's one of my favorite fish to go after because of their explosive and aggressive nature.

Bass are good, but their like turtles to a pickerel's hare....

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They can grow big even in small waters too.  Some of my biggest have come from small pools off of tiny streams when I was a kid.    

I once netted a pickerel fry in a brook a good half mile away from the nearest pond it entered.

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57 mins ago, pogie_boy said:

They can grow big even in small waters too.  Some of my biggest have come from small pools off of tiny streams when I was a kid.    

I once netted a pickerel fry in a brook a good half mile away from the nearest pond it entered.

100%

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About twenty years ago, I was out with my dad on a weedy and shallow South Shore pond. We launched our neglected and sunbleached red Old Town, riddled with BB holes from the target practice of yours truly, and paddled out to a spot where no shore fisherman could dream of reaching. Well, at least not without getting torn up by thorns and crippled with Lyme disease. Armed with schoolie rods wrapped with 10lb, and a bucket of shiners, we were off to catch the biggest largemouth in the Northeast. We weren't, and still aren't, freshwater fishermen.

 

The spot we picked was drenched in fading afternoon sunlight, but with ample shade from a large overhanging tree. My father cast his shiner and bobber 10-15 yards towards the shoreline as I fumbled around and flopped a bait near the canoe. We got to chit-chatting about the Red Sox, my upcoming hockey season, striper fishing, what was for supper, why the sky is blue. Just enjoying the day and being out of the house. 

 

After awhile, we realized that we weren't seeing any action, so we decided to check baits. Scanning the area, my dad's bobber had gone missing. As he reeled in and made tight, his rod doubled over and shook like an epileptic bluefish was on the other end. I wouldn't call it a sleigh ride, but this canoe made two complete rotations before my dad had bested this fish. As the line drew near and the bobber broke the surface, we excitedly leaned over to catch a glimpse of what was surely the new world record largemouth bass. 

 

Our mouths were agape as the open toothy maw of the biggest pickerel I will ever see emerged from the murky water. We were both in awe, but my dad reached down and gilled the fish and flipped it into the boat. I drew back my legs in defense and could do nothing but stare at this alligator in the boat. One of the only times I would ever wish smartphones existed in my childhood. This thing was three foot long at the least, which we confirmed by getting a rough measurement against the rod and getting a tape out later. He managed to get the hook out and flip her back in for the next unsuspecting victim. We later mentioned it to a friend of my dads, a freshwater sharpie, and he had said it would be damn close to a state record, and at least a gold pin fish. Oh well, back to stripers and baseball.  A memory that we'll share forever.

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19 hours ago, pogie_boy said:

They can grow big even in small waters too.  Some of my biggest have come from small pools off of tiny streams when I was a kid.    

I once netted a pickerel fry in a brook a good half mile away from the nearest pond it entered.

It's very possible you actually caught a redfin pickeral which is a different animal altogether. 

They are mini-pickeral and specialize in small flowing backwaters in tiny brooks and feeders and way back in the woods of new beaver swamps.

If the water is big enough to float a medium sized chain, they leave.

Can be hard to tell apart. Don't always have red fins. Quick way is they have a much shorter blunter looking beak.

Last pic is chain for comparison. 

redfin.jpg

redfin2.jpg

20180712_152513.jpg

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Was fishing a local pond and saw a pick about 15" sittin there. Threw a senko it's way and it had no interest at all. Must of been cold.

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7 hours ago, mikez2 said:

It's very possible you actually caught a redfin pickeral which is a different animal altogether. 

They are mini-pickeral and specialize in small flowing backwaters in tiny brooks and feeders and way back in the woods of new beaver swamps.

If the water is big enough to float a medium sized chain, they leave.

Can be hard to tell apart. Don't always have red fins. Quick way is they have a much shorter blunter looking beak.

Last pic is chain for comparison. 

redfin.jpg

redfin2.jpg

20180712_152513.jpg

 

We saw this Red-Shouldered hawk dive right into a small stream to get this Redfin.

Like the Osprey of the woods....

 

rshwithfish4a-XL.jpg.f62763f628ac4c6057992927175885c1.jpg

 

 

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Redfins are a neat little fish. I've picked up a few while fishing for brookies in the little streams that stretch out of the Wompatuck area. They attack with the ferocity of their larger cousins and give a decent little fight considering their size and the fact I catch them while flipping a little more than a rods length away.

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