Ditchbag

Fishing safety thread

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To add to all the hook cutter posts, make sure you try your hook cutters on a few of the largest scrap hooks in your arsenal. I tried to cut a hook that was lodged in my thumb one time with what I thought were a high quality pair of diagonal cutters. They broke at the hinge.  I ended up having to go to the hospital to get the hook out. 

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I think that a $10 plastic lip gripper is one of the most importantly safety items. I use them on any fish caught on a lure with multiple hooks. It pretty much eliminates the possibility of getting a hook in the hand. 

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5 mins ago, z-man said:

I think that a $10 plastic lip gripper is one of the most importantly safety items. I use them on any fish caught on a lure with multiple hooks. It pretty much eliminates the possibility of getting a hook in the hand. 

100%%%%%%%AGREE

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Every year in New England a few canoers or kayakers drown early in the season.  It's always the same story, the water is cold and they aren't wearing a PFD.

 

Seems like the #1 safety tool, no matter how or where you fish, is common sense.

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On ‎4‎/‎4‎/‎2019 at 6:20 AM, Ditchbag said:

Before everybody gets too excited and going out and not thinking very much I think we should go over some basic safety crap. I'll start off by saying that I wear either sunglasses or safety glasses 95% of the time that I fish. I do this because in my younger days trout fishing I ended up with a rooster tail stuck right in my eyebrow 1 inch from my eye.

"I believe" that if "one fishes enough", then 100% of all will eventually get complacent and revert to the unsafe behavior that they were doing before they decided to practice "safe fishing". For example, 10 years ago a lady that fished with me (she has since died of beast cancer) and her sister (also a cancer patient) both always had self inflating vests on "just n case". Karen and Sue never deployed their vests and Karen died (of cancer) way too young. Sue does not go boating/fishing any more. They were the only two persons I have ever seen that "have so much to live for" that they always took such precautions. I myself, along with my friend Ron had an incident where we were fighting for our lives for close to an hour on 09/27/17 and both of us still do not wear flotations devices (PFD's). 

Are we complacent or are we just realistic? The chances are very low that we will experience such a near death (life threatening) situation so we both reverted to our previous unsafe practices. 

It's like how many single guys/girls use condoms 100% of the time?

Not realistic if you fish "almost daily"...

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the most important piece of safty equipment is that thing between your ears known as a brain,if you use it you can leave a lot of things at home were they belong.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I wear a PFD 100% of the time on any boats/watercraft.   I wear auto-inflate suspenders when on the boat, and kayak style on the kayak or canoe.  It’s second nature now and it causes me no discomfort or discontent.   It’s a no-brainer for me.

 

Unfortunately, I’ve suffered two deep lacerations while boating/fishing, both requiring suturing. Once, I tried to “catch” a flying bucket/cutting board combo that had a knife attached, and the second time I slipped cutting bait in some seas.   Both were very bloody hand injuries.  I learned that “a falling knife has no handle”, AND that it’s imperative to carry particular items in my first aid kit.  I also knew by applying my knowledge and keeping calm, I was able to return to port and get treatment.

 

Now, in my first aid kit I keep things that can stop bleeding/effectively provide direct pressure, and have made sure I have a general knowledge of how to apply basic first aid techniques.

 

Being prepared and trained (even if by book vs. experience) is indispensable.   Boy Scouts taught me that as a kid and it is no less relevant in middle age.

Edited by Jonesy02719

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