DoorGunner

Two things at once/

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Saw a thread in another forum about when to deploy a drift sock. I had a drift sock years ago but it's gone now and I never even think about it. My drift sock now is the motor of whatever boat I'm fishing from.

We seem to have to deal with wind more now than ever. Weather is changing and wind does seem to be the most prevalent change to the human eye. How many times have we arrived at the dock and said, CRAP? Nothing screws up a day of fishing like the wind. Heavier weights or bucktails and still trying to keep in touch with the bottom becomes a problem. Kept my mind in gear trying to figure out why and how to beat the problem. Slowly the pieces started falling in place after a windless day and still dealing with holding bottom. It was the middle of a tide on a full moon and the boat was flying down the channel. Started with a half ounce bucktail and ended up with a three ouncer and still had problems. Why? Then it hit me. Water is just like air and higher altitude will always produce stronger winds. Jet stream winds at high altitude can be well over 100 miles per hour but down on the ground we never feel them. On the ground there is a lot more air pressure and winds can't flow freely like they do at altitude. Same way for water. Surface water has little pressure and flows much much faster than deep waters. So my boat was moving with the surface water while my bucktail was near the bottom in much slower flowing water and thats why I needed more weight. If you combine surface water speed along with wind then you just pile speed on speed against that slower bottom flow. 

Deploy a sea anchor and it will slow you down a little but it's still in the faster moving surface water and you can't control exactly where you want to drift. Plus it always seemed to get in the way when I was fighting a fish so I just stopped using it and started up the outboard. I fish two different boats with one being a 17 foot skiff with a 9.9 outboard and a 21 foot CC with a 200 on the back and both work great to get back control of your drift. Just takes a little practice.

Have to run the motor in revers with the stern into the wind or tide. If you try bow first your boat will just want to turn on way or the other so it's stern first. When I head out to my spot I just put the motor in neutral and see how the conditions are effecting me. Then I can reposition the boat so I'm stern into the tide or wind and pop the motor in and out of gear. In gear until the boat just about comes to a stop then back in neutral and as soon as my speed starts to creep up I pop it back into reverse almost to another stop. I keep doing this to where I'm making one drift to others making two or three drifts. Now I can also go back to my 1/4 or 3/4 ounce bucktail and keep it almost vertical because I'm matching the speed of the water down near the bottom. Without a doubt the one thing that I do the produces more fish than any other trick in my book. 

Like I mentioned, you may need to practice and I can't remember how long it took me to get it right but it is right and works ever time out. It's the only reason why I won't fish in someone else's boat. My light tackle just won't work right with anything more than two ounces of weight. There is a real good example on Youtube from one of our shows from way back around 2003. Opening day of summer flounder season with temps in the low 50's and a northeast wind around 15 to 20. The show is Jersey Cape Fishing episode 2. My only suggestion if you try this is to do it alone until you get the hang of it. works so well that I can't even remember the last time I flounder fished with the motor off.

One narrow section of waterway where I and many others love to fish has one problem at different times of the year. On some days the waterway is lined with commercial crab pots. I see boats move in, take one look then leave. I actually like the pots because they are baited structure and the flounder love to hang right next to them waiting for their next target. By running to motor I can slowly move the boat right up to and around the pot because you have that much control by running the motor. All I have to do is check to see where the line from the pot to the float is running then I can pick the flounder off from right around the pot. Motors just don't get us to our spots. They allow us to work those spots, every inch of those spots. If you can fish and run the motor then two things at once will put more fish in the boat.    

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34 mins ago, b4loran said:

Good read, I can only fish with guys that can do this. If you think it helps with fluke imagine how it helps with tile.

Thanks and agree. This will produce for any fish on or near the bottom and forgot one thing.

Do this over a period of time and it becomes second nature. You won't even think about it and your hand will just go to the shifter and wheel automatically without even looking. 

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I always feel bad when I see guys screwing with drift socks, wish I could jump on their boat and give them a ten minute lesson. Next step is these electric motors that you can program.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Agreed. Running the motor is light years ahead of the sock. 

Two friends have electric motors that they can program and do well with one major problem. Constantly complain about mother boards shorting out and the expense and hassles that it involves.  

Edited by DoorGunner

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I can confirm that this works.  I read a post a couple of years ago from DG and decided to try it.   I will never look back.  Also works when the tide is slack to give you a little bit of movement.  I have a drift sock, but have not used it in 2 years.  My catch rate went up significantly.  Period.  Great tip DG and I thank you for it.

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I think them bass guys been using them for awhile, bigger boats and saltwater is a whole new ballgame. Buddy just got a Downeaster and is adding a cockpit helm. Fishing structure,edges,slopes,around pots, clam stakes,you need the motor it seems 99% of the time, how often is wind and tide going to be right?  Love that new outboards are quite now too.

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Agreed that running the motor is a great technique.  I have a trolling motor on my boat, and when you get used to using that, it becomes another tool in the toolbox.

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On 3/26/2019 at 8:19 AM, DoorGunner said:

Agreed. Running the motor is light years ahead of the sock. 

Two friends have electric motors that they can program and do well with one major problem. Constantly complain about mother boards shorting out and the expense and hassles that it involves.  

Fred, I can attest to the trolling motor breakdown problem.  When they work, however, they are fantastic for wind against tide situations. Just point the bow into the wind and set it on cruise control to move with the tide. When the wind is with the tide, I still prefer power drifting with the outboard as I can keep the stern into the wind/tide.  Any tips on power drifting in wind vs tide situation?

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