troutworm

Foxes to be killed at Duxbury Beach

Rate this topic

90 posts in this topic

35 mins ago, troutworm said:

Now they plan to kill the foxes at Duxbury Beach to protect Piping Plovers.

Per channel 4 news at 5 pm today.

Unreal what they will do to try an save those stupid birds. Total waste of tax payer money. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s absolutely ridiculous. One wild animal’s life should not take priority over another’s. The bird people are insane. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

Regardless of how people may feel about the relative importance of the plover....  It’s probably far cheaper to off a few predators than it is to pay for a “taking” of a plover chick.

 

There’s no doubt foxes (as well as coyotes and crows) have inflicted a fair amount of mortality on plover chicks.    To NOT manage these predators could mean that other human activities could be limited or prohibited.

 

https://www.mass.gov/files/documents/2018/03/20/Duxbury Beach Reservation COI for Public Comment.pdf

 

Edited by Jonesy02719

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

From Duxbury Beach Reservation FB page earlier today

 

 

Recently questions have come up regarding the predator management program on Duxbury Beach.  This is a sensitive and oftentimes upsetting topic but is one of the challenges that the Duxbury Beach Reservation faces when trying to balance the many uses of the beach.  

As landowners and stewards of Duxbury Beach for 100 years, the Reservation strives to maintain a balance between protecting the natural resources of the beach, including habitat for wildlife, preserving the barrier which shelters the communities behind it, and providing use of the beach for recreational purposes including over-sand vehicles.  In order to provide use of the beach for recreation, habitat and species conservation regulations must be adhered to including predator management mandates by the United State Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).  

Unfortunately, relocation of individual predators is not an option for multiple reasons:
- It is illegal under Massachusetts law to capture and relocate wildlife off your property
- Conflict, stress, or death caused due to intrusion into an existing individual’s territory
- Harm to the individual if it tries to travel back home (hit by a car) or it may struggle to find food and shelter.  Humans do not always recognize appropriate habitats for wildlife and put them in bad locations.
- Spread of disease
- Disruption of ecological processes by introducing a new species or more individuals to an area
- The problem is not solved, but moved to a new location

While it may seem simple to “let nature take its course” we do not operate in an entirely “natural” system.  With the removal of large predators, such as wolves, from this area by the mid-20th century, mid-sized predators, including fox, coyote, and raccoons, were able to extend their ranges and increase in population in these areas.  There are communities of hundreds of homes flanking Duxbury Beach that provide ample habitat for species like red fox that can do very well in suburban and even urban areas while other species, like the plovers and terns, have had habitat regularly destroyed by development.  Today, the largest cause of plover and tern egg and chick loss on Duxbury Beach, and many other beaches statewide, is predation by species whose populations are not in jeopardy.  

This is not an easy topic and the Reservation will continue to work with state and federal regulators to find the best options for protection on Duxbury Beach.  We appreciate everyone who has taken the time to learn more about the work and understand that we are doing our upmost to strike a balance between the many uses of Duxbury Beach.

If you are interested in reading more about conservation efforts and predator management on Duxbury Beach please visit the DBR website http://www.duxburybeach.com/category/news/.

If you are interested in learning more about statewide shorebird conservation efforts or predator management work, we recommend reaching out the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife.

Edited by FoliFish

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It sucks but this has been going on for years all over the “plover coast”.   If I recall there are/were sanctioned coyote hunts on Monomoy. Wasn’t there a “poison crouton” program on Monomoy designed to control the gull population too?  If memory serves it didn’t go well when birds were dropping dead out of the sky  downtown Chatham lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More than a few years ago the Seashore proposed poisoning the crows, as they were predators of the plovers. Got quite a bit of pushback from people out here at the tip. Probably rightly so, couldn’t you just see thousands of crows  falling from the sky every day - would’ve been great for tourism. ‘Boy called by poisoned crow’

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can’t say I am a fan of this idea. How one life can be more valuable  than another is very hard to comprehend. 

I once walked over the restricted area of beach in my teen years trying to get access to a spot I really enjoyed fishing. I got surrounded by atleast 8 parks officers. They were all yelling freeze, don’t take another step. I thought I was going to fall in a sink hole or something. Well after the 1hr talk with the officers about the Plovers. I further understood the importance of not walking in the area. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 mins ago, fishonnelsons said:

More than a few years ago the Seashore proposed poisoning the crows, as they were predators of the plovers. Got quite a bit of pushback from people out here at the tip. Probably rightly so, couldn’t you just see thousands of crows  falling from the sky every day - would’ve been great for tourism. ‘Boy called by poisoned crow’

Maybe that's what I was thinking about when I mentioned it above.  I thought they actually implemented it haha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've searched and asked around but just can't find what I'm looking for.  Maybe someone here has a resource?  I'd like to see some data on the success/failure of the whole "save the plovers" campaign over the years.  Would also love to see the dollar value associated with said campaign and where the money comes from.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

" As landowners and stewards of Duxbury Beach for 100 years, the Reservation strives to maintain a balance between protecting the natural resources of the beach, "  I'm sure the Wampanoags 200 years prior did not mind having the foxes around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.