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Store-bought Gee vs making clarified butter?

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1 hour ago, JimW said:

I was reading somewhere fructose in excess can cause elevated cholesterol because of how it interacts with the liver.  

DING, DING, DING.......for one. You are on a roll today. :th:

 

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7 hours ago, FizzyFish said:

you can accept that saturated fact and cholesterol are not  a problem.  I chose to believe the Drs. and scientists that have consistently proven via controlled scientific studies that  saturated fats and dietary cholesterol  are main contributors to most if not all of the diet-related chronic diseases, especially obesity, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases, and cancers,

When you say that, are you referring to all saturated fats or only saturated fats from animal sources?

 

I do think there's been a lot of confusion lately over cholesterol.  People took the government's decision to remove the direct link between dietary cholesterol and blood cholesterol as a starter's pistol to eat unlimited amounts of it and assume that there'd be no impact.  The American Heart Association had to point out that there's still a link, and that saturated fat and cholesterol should be limited, especially in those who already suffer from high cholesterol or other cardiovascular ailments.

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21 mins ago, The Fishing Nerd said:

When you say that, are you referring to all saturated fats or only saturated fats from animal sources?

 

I do think there's been a lot of confusion lately over cholesterol.  People took the government's decision to remove the direct link between dietary cholesterol and blood cholesterol as a starter's pistol to eat unlimited amounts of it and assume that there'd be no impact.  The American Heart Association had to point out that there's still a link, and that saturated fat and cholesterol should be limited, especially in those who already suffer from high cholesterol or other cardiovascular ailments.

All.    IMO, very good point.  Just because the "government" says it's ok, doesn't mean it's so. 

The USDA for example is an agency whose main function is to promote agriculture, how can we trust them to decide what we should/should not eat.  Most of the regulatory agencies are highly influenced by industry lobbyists.   Follow the $$$

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54 mins ago, FizzyFish said:

All.    IMO, very good point.  Just because the "government" says it's ok, doesn't mean it's so. 

The USDA for example is an agency whose main function is to promote agriculture, how can we trust them to decide what we should/should not eat.  Most of the regulatory agencies are highly influenced by industry lobbyists.   Follow the $$$

I generally do true to follow the money, but this is a tricky one.

 

One of the reasons you had the low-fat, food pyramid style approach was because of the grain industry.  That's how you ended up with eggs being terrible for your health, but a big bowl of Frosted Flakes being 'greaaaaaaaat!'.

 

Of course, the meat and dairy lobbies aren't slouches either.  The solution really is moderation, and of course more restrictive if you turn out to be the type of person who's obese or has cardiovascular problems.

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take a look at Canada's new food guide.    source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-46964549

 

Is milk healthy? Canada's new food guide says not necessarily

Canada has released a new food guide, and one thing is noticeably missing - a daily dose of dairy.

The guide does away with food groups entirely, and instead encourages people to eat a variety of unprocessed foods.

The last time the food guide was updated was in 2007, and the version unveiled on Tuesday took three years of consultations.

The changes have been praised by advocates for plant-based diets, but have raised the ire of the dairy lobby.

Canada's food guide provides Canadians with nutritional advice for optimal health.

 

The latest edition does away with many standard elements, like food groups, serving sizes and the recommendation that 100% fruit juice can substitute whole fruits.

Canada's food guideImage copyright Health Canada Image caption Canada's food guide uses a plate to represent healthy portion sizes

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All I know when it comes to cholesterol, I do everything you are not supposed to do and yet my HDL is many times over 90 and generally runs in the upper 70s and my LDL is about 125, Triglycerides about 115. So I ain't buying most of what the "experts" say. It is the combination of food types that plays the biggest part.

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Ghee is easy to make at home but it's a bit tedious.

 

IMO, it's worthwhile to use very high quality butter, grass fed, organic... You also have to stand over it watching it closely so it doesn't scorch. I like it for Indian dishes as it has a pretty high smoking point when tempering spices and it lends a nice texture and flavor to dals. 

 

If you make it correctly, my experience is that it will keep at room temperatures for a couple of months, opening and closing it as needed. In the fridge, even longer. 

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22 hours ago, Steve in Mass said:

All I know when it comes to cholesterol, I do everything you are not supposed to do and yet my HDL is many times over 90 and generally runs in the upper 70s and my LDL is about 125, Triglycerides about 115. So I ain't buying most of what the "experts" say. It is the combination of food types that plays the biggest part.

Those are good numbers there

20 hours ago, RI: best part of CT said:

Ghee is easy to make at home but it's a bit tedious.

 

IMO, it's worthwhile to use very high quality butter, grass fed, organic... You also have to stand over it watching it closely so it doesn't scorch. I like it for Indian dishes as it has a pretty high smoking point when tempering spices and it lends a nice texture and flavor to dals. 

 

If you make it correctly, my experience is that it will keep at room temperatures for a couple of months, opening and closing it as needed. In the fridge, even longer. 

Thanks for that.

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On 3/15/2019 at 8:09 AM, Steve in Mass said:

All I know when it comes to cholesterol, I do everything you are not supposed to do and yet my HDL is many times over 90 and generally runs in the upper 70s and my LDL is about 125, Triglycerides about 115. So I ain't buying most of what the "experts" say. It is the combination of food types that plays the biggest part.

I'm 45 ,  HDL 94, LDL 117, Triglycerides 75.

But they still want me to take a statin :shrug:.

I do have a 30% blockage in the LAD. 

 

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On 3/14/2019 at 8:06 AM, Steve in Mass said:

Well, here is one source:

 

https://www.consciouslifestylemag.com/ghee-benefits/

 

And you have to accept a few things like the fact that saturated fat is not the demon it has been made out to be, especially in certain forms, and that eating cholesterol does NOT elevate your blood cholesterol levels, but eating things that cause your liver to manufacture too much of it is the issue there.

I believe this is what medical science has found . Dietary cholesterol is a different animal. It's the the devil as previously thought. 

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