jjdbike

Store-bought Gee vs making clarified butter?

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Hey folks,

 

I occasionally find times I wish I had clarified butter on hand for sauteeing, baking, frying etc. But by the time I realize that it would be appropriate, it's an inconvienent time to make it. In the past I've made just enough clarifiied butter for the current recipe. It was time consuming and I felt like I wasted a good deal of butter trying to skim off the solids. Occsionally I think I'll make a big batch and freeze it in portions so I have it on hand when needed

 

Yesterday at Acme I noticed Gee on an unrefridgerated shelf in the organic section. It was labeled "Gee, clarified organic butter". From what I understand, Gee is heated more than traditional clarfied butter to brown milk solids in order to brown & give it a "nuttier flavor". In otherwords, its clarified brown butter?

 

Do any of you folks use Gee? If so, for what? Generally speaking, is Gee an appropriate replacement for making clarifed butter at home? 

JD

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3 hours ago, jjdbike said:

From what I understand, Gee is heated more than traditional clarfied butter to brown milk solids in order to brown & give it a "nuttier flavor".

This is true, but you have to be careful to heat/brown those solids slowly, as you want them to just start to turn tan.

 

Ghee is shelf stable at room temp. It is also friendly to those that have lactose intolerance. And the fat is actually good for you even though it is sat fat.

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9 hours ago, Steve in Mass said:

This is true, but you have to be careful to heat/brown those solids slowly, as you want them to just start to turn tan.

 

Ghee is shelf stable at room temp. It is also friendly to those that have lactose intolerance. And the fat is actually good for you even though it is sat fat.

please elucidate why it is good for you.    information sources would be good too.

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1 hour ago, FizzyFish said:

please elucidate why it is good for you.    information sources would be good too.

Good too you or good for you?

JD

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i used store bought clarified butter couple times but never really liked it, for the price is better to do your own in my opinion. I use clarified butter only for Hollandaise and Bearnaise sauce, and always make it at home, keep 3/4 of the butter for clarified then keep on cooking the rest until you get your own brown butter for your fish dish is a delicacy, make sure you strain the brown butter with a coffee filter at then end and use as needed.

It doesnt get better than that, 2 birds in one stone. my 2 cents

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Posted (edited) · Report post

14 hours ago, FizzyFish said:

please elucidate why it is good for you.    information sources would be good too.

Well, here is one source:

 

https://www.consciouslifestylemag.com/ghee-benefits/

 

And you have to accept a few things like the fact that saturated fat is not the demon it has been made out to be, especially in certain forms, and that eating cholesterol does NOT elevate your blood cholesterol levels, but eating things that cause your liver to manufacture too much of it is the issue there.

Edited by Steve in Mass

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3 hours ago, Steve in Mass said:

Well, here is one source:

 

https://www.consciouslifestylemag.com/ghee-benefits/

 

And you have to accept a few things like the fact that saturated fat is not the demon it has been made out to be, especially in certain forms, and that eating cholesterol does NOT elevate your blood cholesterol levels, but eating things that cause your liver to manufacture too much of it is the issue there.

you can accept that saturated fact and cholesterol are not  a problem.  I chose to believe the Drs. and scientists that have consistently proven via controlled scientific studies that  saturated fats and dietary cholesterol  are main contributors to most if not all of the diet-related chronic diseases, especially obesity, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases, and cancers,

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On 3/13/2019 at 4:39 AM, jjdbike said:

Hey folks,

 

I occasionally find times I wish I had clarified butter on hand for sauteeing, baking, frying etc. But by the time I realize that it would be appropriate, it's an inconvienent time to make it. In the past I've made just enough clarifiied butter for the current recipe. It was time consuming and I felt like I wasted a good deal of butter trying to skim off the solids. Occsionally I think I'll make a big batch and freeze it in portions so I have it on hand when needed

 

Yesterday at Acme I noticed Gee on an unrefridgerated shelf in the organic section. It was labeled "Gee, clarified organic butter". From what I understand, Gee is heated more than traditional clarfied butter to brown milk solids in order to brown & give it a "nuttier flavor". In otherwords, its clarified brown butter?

 

Do any of you folks use Gee? If so, for what? Generally speaking, is Gee an appropriate replacement for making clarifed butter at home? 

JD

Ghee and clarified butter have a different taste.  Hard to describe, and neither is better I say, but different.  If yoy saute something delicate-green beans- you re really going to taste the ghee.  Do you like it?  Up to you I guess.

That said I usually have some around, and I like using it.  Its stupid expensive.

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On 3/13/2019 at 4:39 AM, jjdbike said:

Hey folks,

 

I occasionally find times I wish I had clarified butter on hand for sauteeing, baking, frying etc. But by the time I realize that it would be appropriate, it's an inconvienent time to make it. In the past I've made just enough clarifiied butter for the current recipe. It was time consuming and I felt like I wasted a good deal of butter trying to skim off the solids. Occsionally I think I'll make a big batch and freeze it in portions so I have it on hand when needed

 

Yesterday at Acme I noticed Gee on an unrefridgerated shelf in the organic section. It was labeled "Gee, clarified organic butter". From what I understand, Gee is heated more than traditional clarfied butter to brown milk solids in order to brown & give it a "nuttier flavor". In otherwords, its clarified brown butter?

 

Do any of you folks use Gee? If so, for what? Generally speaking, is Gee an appropriate replacement for making clarifed butter at home? 

JD

Added the bold for reference....  Yes.  You have clarified butter by separating the fats and the solids.  You have browned butter by cooking the solids until brown & nutty.  You have ghee by separating the browned solids and fats (clarified brown butter).

 

I use ghee in a lot of baking where I want to add some more depth of flavor.  I use it in various cookie recipes.  It also works nicely to whip some melted ghee into pancake batter.  Not only does it add some flavor and mouthfeel, I never use any type of fat in the pan/griddle when I'm making the pancakes and they come out perfect every time (including the first pancake).

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1 hour ago, FizzyFish said:

you can accept that saturated fact and cholesterol are not  a problem.  I chose to believe the Drs. and scientists that have consistently proven via controlled scientific studies that  saturated fats and dietary cholesterol  are main contributors to most if not all of the diet-related chronic diseases, especially obesity, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases, and cancers,

That is fine if that is your outlook on it. But there have been just as many studies that have found the opposite. so I guess you choose one side or the other. Being a scientist myself, I gotta go with the stuff that makes pretty much common sense to me backed up by chemistry. And many times, it goes against the rain of mainstream thought.

 

I know what works for me..........and I am sure you know what works for you, and that is all that counts. :)

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26 mins ago, Steve in Mass said:

That is fine if that is your outlook on it. But there have been just as many studies that have found the opposite. so I guess you choose one side or the other. Being a scientist myself, I gotta go with the stuff that makes pretty much common sense to me backed up by chemistry. And many times, it goes against the rain of mainstream thought.

 

I know what works for me..........and I am sure you know what works for you, and that is all that counts. :)

Having also been a "scientist" in health related fields, for over 50 years .  I go with scientific studies about health related issues that are  the "gold standard " double blind placebo controlled studies.  I also check who paid for the studies to be sure there are no financial conflicts .  :D

Edited by FizzyFish

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Well, that is fine, and not to argue, but it is being found more and more that the long held theories about food and their affect on health are being called into question, and many of them being bedunked.

 

But as I said, each sole has to follow their own path, and there is nothing wrong with that, in fact, it is what makes the world go round........

 

 

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Key to me is always moderation.  Good for you is relative to alternatives.   I was reading somewhere fructose in excess can cause elevated cholesterol because of how it interacts with the liver.  

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On 3/13/2019 at 4:39 AM, jjdbike said:

Hey folks,

 

I occasionally find times I wish I had clarified butter on hand for sauteeing, baking, frying etc. But by the time I realize that it would be appropriate, it's an inconvienent time to make it. In the past I've made just enough clarifiied butter for the current recipe. It was time consuming and I felt like I wasted a good deal of butter trying to skim off the solids. Occsionally I think I'll make a big batch and freeze it in portions so I have it on hand when needed

 

Yesterday at Acme I noticed Gee on an unrefridgerated shelf in the organic section. It was labeled "Gee, clarified organic butter". From what I understand, Gee is heated more than traditional clarfied butter to brown milk solids in order to brown & give it a "nuttier flavor". In otherwords, its clarified brown butter?

 

Do any of you folks use Gee? If so, for what? Generally speaking, is Gee an appropriate replacement for making clarifed butter at home? 

JD

My experience - and I haven't used a lot of different types - is that the quality of clarified butter or ghee is always dependent on the quality of the butter used.  As such, the store bought stuff typically isn't very good.

 

Clarifying butter isn't that hard, but store bought CB or ghee will do in a pinch.  The ghee does have a distinct flavor, but if used in sauces and rouxs (I tend to make a bechamel sauce with it that I'll make some seafood lasagna with), it can add a beneficial flavor (and I'm not a big fan of Indian cuisine).

 

Buy a big batch of European butter and clarify it yourself once, and use it over time.  It doesn't spoil quickly, and it tastes damn good.

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