JALCF

Excited Surf Newb

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30 posts in this topic

2 mins ago, Uncle Stu said:

If you want to catch half as many fish and have twice the fun... try fly fishing.

I have a friend who primarily fishes the salt with a fly rod, either from shore or his boat. We were fishing a MV beach about three years ago at night. I had a couple of surf rods with me. There was also a light breeze blowing in.

 

I was throwing a Bomber.  I was getting a lot of fish, mostly in the 24" - 27" range with an occasional keeper in the mix.

 

My friend was fruitlessly casting over & over again with his fly rod.

 

After watching me catch a few fish during the first hour, he proceeded to ask me if he could use my 2nd rod. I said "sure" and put the same color Bomber on the line for him.  :)

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I wholeheartedly disagree with bait catches more.

I say the opposite. 

Billions of hours are wasted by baitfishermen sitting in one spot waiting for a bite that never comes.

 

I've caught less than a dozen stripers on bait in my 30 year career, and those were mostly all the same day.

 

If I can't get em on lures, I can't get em at all.

 

Way cheaper, simpler, cleaner and no innocent animals have to die for you to get skunked.

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11 hours ago, bdowning said:

Id avoid the cape cod canal. The packs of wild land predators roaming the service road make the water dogs seem like puppies. :eek:

Ha! Thanks for the tip. Yeah, I think I set myself up better for some fun on the surf and later on I'll try to figure out the canal.

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10 hours ago, Brothers said:

Joe, 

 

Iv only been in the surf for 4 or so years now and i'm always learning....always. Spend some times reading and watching videos on how to read the water, understanding when and were fish stage will really help you out. John Skinner has some great books that you might want to check out, he also along with others have some great videos on youtube. 

 

Before you end up chest deep in the surf at night, spend time in the daylight understanding the waters and really understanding the places you plan to fish. There are a couple spots at night that I won't fish alone without my brother, I'm old enough (34) to understand how fast a good night alone can turn into a bad situation. 

 

I don't know what to tell you about the sharks, Im fishing the North Shore and don't ever think about them. I understand the Cape if full of them now and will continue to get worse. I have a lot of close surfing friends who don't bother with those waters anymore, and these are guys who typically never worried about sharks. It's one thing to be ankle deep and another to be swimming to rocks or taking casts chest deep. Follow your gut feeling, If something doesn't feel right then don't push it. 

 

Keep with it and once you get the bug, there is no turning back. I have read countless stories how this addiction has ruined relationships and marriages. I had a decent amount of hobbies and friends before I got into surf fishing and most of those hobbies and friends fell by the wayside. Its brutal, its all I think about. 

 

Good luck, 

 

John. 

Thanks John,

 

I'm a big fan of John Skinner, I assume many fishermen are, and all the info he puts out there. Much of the gear I purchased are based on his recommendations and reviews. I will be picking up some books of his as a way to support him in return and learn more.

 

I'm a pretty careful guy now compared to my 20 year old self and night fishing will get put on the back burner until I get comfortable with my surroundings.

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6 hours ago, zak-striper said:

Welcome to SOL Joe.

 

I had a similar story. I grew up and lived in Western MA for a long time so I didn't get very many opportunities to fish the salt. However, I did fish at Quabbin a ton while growing up so I knew how to fish.

 

Once I started living & working in greater Boston I spent a year or so reading all I could about striper fishing because I always wanted to do it. I read about rods, reels, lures, locations, tides, moons, etc.

 

It's great information to get you started.

 

However, you won't truly learn about striper fishing, or other saltwater species, until you put in your time. The more time the better.

 

A lot of what I read was true, however, I learned a ton more by fishing spots over & over & over again. I didn't take long before my original rod, reel and lure selection changed dramatically as I learned how certain areas fished and what lures worked the best. I also observed other fishermen, either at the beaches or the canal, as much as possible. I also asked a lot of questions of those willing to share their experiences.

 

Saltwater fishing is a life long learning experience. I try to fish new locations every year. I also try to learn a new fishing lure or technique each season as well to further broaden my knowledge and back of tricks.

 

Keep a log of your fishing. Every year is different. Mother nature can dramatically change every season. There are consistencies every year but there are also great differences every year. Logging your outings will help you acquire a knowledge base of how weather can impact your fishing.

 

Good luck out there!

 

This is definitely my mentality right now.

 

I fished freshwater for most of my life and I only hit the salt sporadically when I was a kid. Every lake, river or part of the coast is a bit different and I'm looking forward to putting my time in and learning about the area more.

 

Thanks

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In early May start fishing the south side beaches of Cape Cod with small soft plastic baits. (Zoom flukes or storm shads will work). Keep moving until you find the schoolie stripers. They will be there and active. You just need to find them 

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If you’re on the south shore of mass, swing by Monahans Marine in Weymouth some afternoon, and bring your reel. You’re going to wanna be running braid and it can get expensive so I’ll help you out and spool you up w/ your choice of braid for half off.  I’m a surfcaster myself and have the shelves stocked with practically everything you’ll need from bucktails and swimshads to SP minnows and Cordell pencils, and red fins, everything you’ll need to get started.  I’m by no means an expert but fish local waters more nights than not around here. 

Goodluck 

 

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JAL I would suggest that you bait fish to start.

A true bait fisherman catches his/her own bait.

In doing this the angler learns so much about the marine ecosystem.

Guys who just chuck pieces of wood or plastic are so divorced and insulated from the world around them. 

They really are narrow minded and clueless.

If I can help plz feel free to PM me.......:) 

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4 hours ago, robc22 said:

JAL I would suggest that you bait fish to start.

A true bait fisherman catches his/her own bait.

In doing this the angler learns so much about the marine ecosystem.

Guys who just chuck pieces of wood or plastic are so divorced and insulated from the world around them. 

They really are narrow minded and clueless.

If I can help plz feel free to PM me.......:) 

Thats alot of people you're calling brain dead

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6 mins ago, Ditchbag said:

Thats alot of people you're calling brain dead

lol u don't know me I guess........:)

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@JALCF Stick with a few known spots that produce and fish them hard. Start during the day to get comfortable with your surroundings and pay attention to bait patterns, wind direction, tides, moons, and what produces for you and take notes. Once you have confidence with knot tying and all of the basics, head out at night (preferably with a buddy, you may have to meet one based on your post) and switch up your baits/lures and re-learn your spots in the dark. Get those locations down to a science and you will open doors for other spots with the knowledge you have obtained from focusing on your go-to's. Every beach, jetty, boulder field, presents its own challenges and be prepared to go home many a days skunked, but learn something new on every outing. Be safe out there and have fun!

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23 hours ago, HanoverStriper said:

Just curious. Why do people recommend starting with bait fishing? 

To those who began to bait fish the canal first in my opinion learned more about what to look for in different places along the canal . Not dead sticking bait , but drifting it. You will learn where the holes are where the larger fish of size find a home when you do not see them in suicide mode like the past several years . You may not agree , but every place one learns with bait will become a place later to also,eel, jigging or use swimming plugs in as well You will become more aware of the undercurrents, back washes and circling waters along with what  makes good water to fish in.   I would also agree with Rob on learning so much more about the environment when using bait . Go home each day with another chapter in fishing the CCC is a lesson well learned for later on when some of the places you once may have fished are no longer available to you because of physical restrictions . Search, enjoy, learn and share  the experiences

Edited by Angler #1

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One can fish either bait or lures in a brain dead fashion.


It's just easier to fish bait brain-deadded as all you do is chuck the bait out and stop, whereas plugging brain-deadded means a lot more work :)    

 

The truth is, as A#1 points out, there is more to both of them.  It's about figuring out where the fish are, and giving them something they'll want to eat in a way that makes it possible.

 

Take some people's suggestions for fishing the south side early season.   Well you can do this with soft plastics OR you can do it with strips of squid or seaworms.  If  I have all day, I'll usually give both a try.   There are a couple spots I used to catch tog and schoolies in April on seaworms (before the choggies arive in force).   Plugging in such a spot was useless and jigging was a guarantee to lose lots of gear, but fishing with seaworms I usually went home with a couple tog for the table at least.

 

One bit of advice I'd leave you with is to not waste too much time in any one spot.  Sure maybe a bite will turn on, but if you're fishing while the water is moving and nobody's biting and you've tried everything that you guess might work... move on.  Even if it's 50 yards down the beach or to another spot.

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Welcome aboard! Your excitement has got me fired up again! Ten minutes ago I almost forgot about fishing coming soon. Good luck out there! 

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Welcome to what hopefully (or not) turns into a life long obsession! My advice is to start scouting locations in the day so that you get a good lay of the land. Also, when wading a new location always do it on a dropping tide.

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