jjdbike

"Salt Fat Acid Heat" on Netflix

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Hey Eeveryone,

 

A buddy of mine tirned me onto this four episode Netflix series. Samin Nosrat asserts that underastanding and know how to use these four elements, i.e. salt, fat, heat and fire, is at the heart of knowing how to cook. One epispde is focused on each. In my opinion, the locations, simlicity and beauty of these are very nice.

Respectfully,

JD

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, NaturalScience said:

JD,

I was able to watch some of this the other day.

Pretty cool.

I especially like part showcasing the "true" soy sauce brewed in wooden barrels.

Thanks  Brother,

I dug that too.

Many other moments like this throughout the series.

JD

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2 hours ago, jjdbike said:

Thanks  Brother,

I dug that too.

Many other moments like this throughout the series.

JD

I found it interesting she salts her steaks for so long before cooking. 

I always seasoned it rather close to cooking time.

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8 hours ago, NaturalScience said:

I found it interesting she salts her steaks for so long before cooking. 

I always seasoned it rather close to cooking time.

A dry brine.

I would be interesting to do a side by side comparason.

Season one a head of time and one just before cooking.

See if there is any discernable differances.

Personally, I assume the one seasoned a head of time may have a slightly deeper penetration (especially if poked w/ some holes), but that's just a guess.

This may be more appropriate for tougher thicker cuts, as opposed to a high quality tender and natrually flavorful steak.

JD

 

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Salting a steak ahead of time causes the juices to come to the surface, but as time goes on, because of osmosis and the driving force of the salt concentrate of the liquid left within the meat's cells, the juices return to the cells of the meat to help return it closer to equilibrium, keeping the steak juicy as it cooks.

 

Salting just before cooking, those juices are drawn to the surface, and then they hit the hot grill and evaporate of the surface. 

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I think pre-salting meat also denatures proteins so they shrink less while cooking squeezing less moisture out.   When I can I salt pretty much any meat or poultry in advance.   Big roasts and turkeys need a couple days.  

 

Serious Eats did a side by side test with steaks.   More than an hour was best.  Next best was immediately before cooking. Anything in between drew out moisture but didn’t allow enough time to be absorbed back into the meat.   

 

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sounds like a good series...as far as dry rubs go ( I think that's what was meant as a dry brine?; I might be wrong); anyway, if I am figuring what to have for dinner on the fly, I'll rub a steak or chicken and cook it up that night. If my wife and I are ahead of the game, we'll rub the meat one night and cook it the next...big flavor difference as the spices get into and flavor the inside also.

 

Porchetta is a dish that you rub the meat, and in this case a pork butt, and let sit for 24 hours then cook the next day. it's amazing how flavorful this meat gets. There are lots of porchetta recipes out there; this is one of them

 

5-6 lb boneless pork butt

3 TBS fennel seeds

12 garlic cloves

1/2 cup fresh rosemary

1/4 cup fresh thyme

1/2 cup olive oil

s&p

 

- toast and grind seeds and put in food processor along with the rosemary, thyme, garlic, s&p; pulse a bit then add the oil to make a paste

- make some knife slits on the fat cap and rub the paste into and all over the meat

- put in zip lock bag in fridge, turn every once in a while for 24 hrs

- then throw in oven and cover, at 350 for 2-21/2 hrs

-slice, eat, then smile

 

 

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5 hours ago, jjdbike said:

A dry brine.

I would be interesting to do a side by side comparason.

Season one a head of time and one just before cooking.

See if there is any discernable differances.

Personally, I assume the one seasoned a head of time may have a slightly deeper penetration (especially if poked w/ some holes), but that's just a guess.

This may be more appropriate for tougher thicker cuts, as opposed to a high quality tender and natrually flavorful steak.

JD

 

Yeah man. There's really a lot to this stuff once you get past the basics.  Even that bit she mentioned about not wasting time doing crosshatching on the steaks but brown it all over by moving it often cause browning equals flavor. 

I have to look up the science behind dry brining now. Lol.

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pre salting the steak will change its texture, usually just a few mm in if less than 2 hours...it becomes slightly cured and "hammy." This isn't good or bad, it's just different. You'll also get deeper, more even seasoning. 

 

If anyone orders a well done steak, having a couple cured pieces will be doing them a favor.

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4 hours ago, JimW said:

I think pre-salting meat also denatures proteins so they shrink less while cooking squeezing less moisture out.

Absolutely, I forgot to mention that. Good observation and explanation on why the cells hold the moisture the second time around. :th:

 

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Just now, buddha162 said:

If anyone orders a well done steak, having a couple cured pieces will be doing them a favor.

Giving them tofu instead would be doing them a favor, but that's a different story..... ;)

 

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So here I am thinking it was just me and JD talking in this thread and I come back to share about this brining thing and apparently you guys already shared this info hours before I even started talking about it originally . Doh.   :hooked:

Day late and a dollar short. Lol.

All your information is spot on with what I looked up.

 

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9 hours ago, jjdbike said:

A dry brine.

I would be interesting to do a side by side comparason.

Season one a head of time and one just before cooking.

See if there is any discernable differances.

Personally, I assume the one seasoned a head of time may have a slightly deeper penetration (especially if poked w/ some holes), but that's just a guess.

This may be more appropriate for tougher thicker cuts, as opposed to a high quality tender and natrually flavorful steak.

JD

 

Go to seriouseats dotcom they did just that.   The guy who owns the site is a MIT grad, PHD and cookbook writer.  Great site.

 

Read a half dozen cookbooks or listen to a half dozen celebrity chefs, and you're likely to hear at least as many different responses as to when you should salt your meat. Some claim salting immediately before putting it in the pan is best. Others opt not to salt the meat at all, instead salting the pan and placing the meat directly on top. Still others insist on salting and resting for up to a few days in advance. Who's right?

To test this, I bought myself a a half dozen thick-cut bone-in ribeyes (I love the smile butchers get in their eyes when you do this) and salted them at 10 minute intervals before searing them in a hot skillet. So the last steak went into a pan immediately after salting, while the first steak went in a full 50 minutes after salting. All of the steaks were allowed to rest at room temperature for the full 50 minutes, ensuring that they were all at the same starting temperature before cooking began.

Photo showing three stages of salted steak.
 

Salted beef.

The results? The steaks that were salted immediately before cooking and those that were salted and rested for at least 40 minutes turned out far better than those that were cooked at any point in between. What was up with those 10, 20, and 30 minute steaks?

Here's what's going on.

  • Immediately after salting the salt rests on the surface of the meat, undissolved. All the steak's juices are still inside the muscle fibers. Searing at this stage results in a clean, hard sear.
  • Within 3 or 4 minutes the salt, through the process of osmosis, will begin to draw out liquid from the beef. This liquid beads up on the surface of the meat. Try to sear at this point and you waste valuable heat energy simply evaporating this large amount of pooled liquid. Your pan temperature drops, your sear is not as hard, and crust development and flavor-building Maillard browning reactions are inhibited.
  • Starting at around 10 to 15 minutes, the brine formed by the salt dissolving in the meat's juices will begin to break down the muscle structure of the beef, causing it to become much more absorptive. The brine begins to slowly work its way back into the meat.
  • By the end of 40 minutes, most of the liquid has been reabsorbed into the meat. A small degree of evaporation has also occurred, causing the meat to be ever so slightly more concentrated in flavor.

Not only that, but I found that even after the liquid has been reabsorbed, it doesn't stop there. As the meat continues to rest past 40 minutes, the salt and brine will slowly work their way deeper and deeper into the muscle structure, giving you built-in seasoning beyond just the outer surface you'd get from cooking right after salting or salting the skillet.

Indeed, the absolute best steak I had was one that I had salted on both sides then allowed to rest on a rack overnight in the refrigerator uncovered. It appears to dry out slightly, but it's only superficial—the amount of drying that occurs from an overnight rest (about 5% moisture loss) is negligible compared to the amount of moisture driven off during cooking anyway (upwards of 20%, even more in the hard-seared edges). As the salt makes its way back into the meat, you'll probably also notice that it becomes a deeper color. That's because the dissolved proteins scatter light differently than they did when they were still whole.

Moral of the story: If you've got the time, salt your meat for at least 40 minutes and up to overnight before cooking. If you haven't got 40 minutes, it's better to season immediately before cooking. Cooking the steak anywhere between three and 40 minutes after salting is the worst way to do it.

 

Edited by Cpalms

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Great series,and if you liked it, watch Michael Pollan's Cooked. She also appears in it, she was a food writing student of his at Berkeley. I'ev loved Pollan's books, but I've been hesitant to read his most recent one about psychedelics. 

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