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What are the best 2 Canal rods for jigging and plugging

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2 hours ago, DEM Parking Lot said:

Same commute time for me.  I always keep a spare setup in the truck, but never take more than one with me to leave unattended on the bike.

 

I would never leave it unattended in my truck. Would rather have it with me.  :shrug:

 

I don't leave setups on the bike either though. Between the wind blowing it over and someone running off with it everything I bring comes down the rocks with me.  

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On 3/19/2019 at 11:02 AM, FoliFish said:

There's a recent addition to the canal game that's gaining some traction, and rightfully so.  Aubut Rods (Duxbury MA) is building some great canal sticks on 10' one-piece blanks.  I believe they're all United Composite blanks and there are 2 or 3 really good options depending on what you're looking to do.  

YES, YES, some really, nice Canal sticks by Chis A., UNITED COMPOSITES, out of California...Made in the USA, i got the 10ft. Monster blank, 2-8, big plug rod....

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Posted (edited) · Report post

*

Edited by TimS
It’s a thread about canal rods - if you have to add ‘not sure it’s a canal rod’ it seems overly promotional

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The only reason I pointed out the EDGE ROD Tim was the specs fall in line with rods that were being discussed . It was an open discussion , I do not surf fish now , but have for many years when I was younger , so I simply added it was possible this rod would serve canal guys very well since it was very light weight .

A friend who surf fishes religiously owns one and mentioned awhile back that he prefers one of his EDGE RODS for a lot of applications . I don’t own one so I can’t give an accurate analysis of its performance from that standpoint .

 I don’t fish the canal , but have caught 1000’s of bass in that area for many years .

My intent was to inform that it was available that’s all sorry if I overstepped the guidelines regarding the discussion .

 

 

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On 3/8/2019 at 2:51 PM, beerdoh said:

I'm still using a Star Paraflex 11' 3-8oz with a BG5000 on it. It's not sexy but I used it exclusively for heavy plugging and jigging through the blitzes of 2017 and all last year as well. The only time I use a lighter setup is when throwing loaded Cordell's and SS poppers out to breaking fish. 

The Paraflex/BG5000 combo has dozens of 40+" canal fish on it. If the rod breaks, they send me a new one. I broke a Paraflex once and they sent me a replacement that had a bent guide. I called them to complain and they sent me a new rod and told me to keep the other so now I have a spare!

I'm with Cal though, I see more TFO's at the ditch than any other rod except for maybe Tiralejo's.

Damn that's good service by star!

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On 3/8/2019 at 7:58 AM, Dan_evan1 said:

I would personally not get a Twin Power, but that’s just me. I’d take a Gosa 10k all day long over that and save the money. I really wish they’d bring back the 14k Gosa but removing that size was simply pushing people to the Twin Power if they wanted a 14k but didn’t want to pay Stella Pricing.

 

You're going to get opinions for days but for me personally, my built 10’ Blackhole with k-frames is hands down my all time favorite jigging rod. And best plugging rod?? That really depends on whether you’re a typical 11-12’ 2-6 rating type or more of what seems to be the ever increasing trend of heavier plugs and the rods to match. The 12’ Century Surf Machine Elite 2-8 oz with RV guides was one of the sweetest rods I’ve thrown lately. 

What is the difference between a plugging and a jigging rod? I plan to visit the CCC this September, bringing me a Sebile Magic Swimmers and some top water plugs I’ve seen in your YouTube videos.  Penn Slammer 3 6500 and Shimano Saragossa SW 8000 would be my 2 reels.

 

thank you for the replies 

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7 hours ago, IFish4Free said:

What is the difference between a plugging and a jigging rod? I plan to visit the CCC this September, bringing me a Sebile Magic Swimmers and some top water plugs I’ve seen in your YouTube videos.  Penn Slammer 3 6500 and Shimano Saragossa SW 8000 would be my 2 reels.

 

thank you for the replies 

Jigging rod will be faster and be able to throw more weight typically. In all honesty if you aren't going to be a regular at the canal you can do both with a mod fast rod rated 2-6 or 3-8. I've put hundreds of fish over 40" at the canal on a star paraflex with no issues. The key is to have a rod with plenty of backbone, heavy line, and a nearly locked drag.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

13 hours ago, IFish4Free said:

What is the difference between a plugging and a jigging rod? I plan to visit the CCC this September, bringing me a Sebile Magic Swimmers and some top water plugs I’ve seen in your YouTube videos.  Penn Slammer 3 6500 and Shimano Saragossa SW 8000 would be my 2 reels.

 

thank you for the replies 

those are two good reels,i would use the Penn to jig,the retrieve is the same on the two reels, about 42in., but the the drag is greater on the Penn, 40lb. ,, the Gossa 27lb.... remember Jigging, is not mastered by videos, it takes much of a learning curve, putting time in, having the RIGHT gear, learn to read the waters, having the proper jigs, where, when and how, Jigging is not easy to master at the CCC, ......remember also, respect is BIG there, and rods faster the better...

Edited by lureman

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18 hours ago, IFish4Free said:

What is the difference between a plugging and a jigging rod? I plan to visit the CCC this September, bringing me a Sebile Magic Swimmers and some top water plugs I’ve seen in your YouTube videos.  Penn Slammer 3 6500 and Shimano Saragossa SW 8000 would be my 2 reels.

 

thank you for the replies 

Both Clint and Lureman provided spot on advice in my opinion. You’re all set for reels, and like Clint said, if you’re not a regular at the canal, and are only going to visit here and there, find yourself a nice “all around” rod. I’d look for something that’s between 10’ and 11’6 depending on your comfort level and rated something like 3-8, 2-7, 3-7. A rod like the 11’ Heavy Tiralejo is rated 3-6 but is more like a 3-8.

 

For me personally I prefer a 10’ fast action jigging rod.  An outstanding budget or entry level jigging rod for the money and something I recommend is the 10’6 TiCA TC3 2-8 oz Fast action. It’s like $130, Fuji hardloy guides, Fuji reel seat, plenty of power, and fast enough to lift and hold those heavier lead heads. 

 

A major factor in the changes of modern day jigging is the paddle tail jig design. That 20 degree (give or take from one manufacturer to another) paddle tail acts like a parachute brake in the current. It allows you to cast out, get contact with the bottom, lift, and then just do a nice slow retrieve while allowing the paddle tail to sweep. The slightest angler input in terms of line retrieve will cause the jig to instantly rise. A lot of people who try this method don’t understand just how fast that jig will rise and need to really slow their retrieve down, especially once your lure is past you swimming against the current. Conversely, if the current is really steaming, they can actually inhibit you from staying in contact with the bottom because of that tail, and that’s when I’ll change to a bucktail, or rat tail (Sluggo style) to stay down.

 

They can provide someone who may be new to the canal with a little more confidence/forgiveness to target fish holding close to the bottom without bouncing a heavy bucktail (like Lureman said, jigging the canal has a big learning curve, especially with bucktails). This method of slow swimming the paddle tail also isn’t so demanding in terms of having a dedicated proper jig stick because you’re not required to repeatedly lift the lead off the bottom and reiterates what Clint noted about not needing a very fast/heavy setup. The heavy, fast action rods aren’t utilized to just cast the weight out, but to have the ability to lift, hold, and control heavy jigs with the most efficient energy transfer between that entire chain that connects the angler to the lure. 

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On 4/20/2019 at 5:24 PM, Dan_evan1 said:

Both Clint and Lureman provided spot on advice in my opinion. You’re all set for reels, and like Clint said, if you’re not a regular at the canal, and are only going to visit here and there, find yourself a nice “all around” rod. I’d look for something that’s between 10’ and 11’6 depending on your comfort level and rated something like 3-8, 2-7, 3-7. A rod like the 11’ Heavy Tiralejo is rated 3-6 but is more like a 3-8.

 

For me personally I prefer a 10’ fast action jigging rod.  An outstanding budget or entry level jigging rod for the money and something I recommend is the 10’6 TiCA TC3 2-8 oz Fast action. It’s like $130, Fuji hardloy guides, Fuji reel seat, plenty of power, and fast enough to lift and hold those heavier lead heads. 

 

A major factor in the changes of modern day jigging is the paddle tail jig design. That 20 degree (give or take from one manufacturer to another) paddle tail acts like a parachute brake in the current. It allows you to cast out, get contact with the bottom, lift, and then just do a nice slow retrieve while allowing the paddle tail to sweep. The slightest angler input in terms of line retrieve will cause the jig to instantly rise. A lot of people who try this method don’t understand just how fast that jig will rise and need to really slow their retrieve down, especially once your lure is past you swimming against the current. Conversely, if the current is really steaming, they can actually inhibit you from staying in contact with the bottom because of that tail, and that’s when I’ll change to a bucktail, or rat tail (Sluggo style) to stay down.

 

They can provide someone who may be new to the canal with a little more confidence/forgiveness to target fish holding close to the bottom without bouncing a heavy bucktail (like Lureman said, jigging the canal has a big learning curve, especially with bucktails). This method of slow swimming the paddle tail also isn’t so demanding in terms of having a dedicated proper jig stick because you’re not required to repeatedly lift the lead off the bottom and reiterates what Clint noted about not needing a very fast/heavy setup. The heavy, fast action rods aren’t utilized to just cast the weight out, but to have the ability to lift, hold, and control heavy jigs with the most efficient energy transfer between that entire chain that connects the angler to the lure. 

casting jigs, is one thing,but to my way of thinking, the rods ability to lift, hold and allow the jig to flutter back down, are a more imporant consideration....

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