jeffreyrichard

Any downside to adding studs to wading boots?

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Purchased a pair of Cabela Ultralites ... they come with studs I can screw in. Was thinking of adding the studs for fishing at the Canal instead of using my clumsy Korters slip-ons. I primarily wade the beaches, so not a lot of value with studs for that, although I venture into some boulder fields on occasion. Thoughts?

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Put em in. If you’re treading in rocky areas they’re obviously useful, but if you’re in sand, so what? 

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I haven't found a downside yet.

 

One thing I did notice was that when walking on the beach with my studded wading boots at night, I would make sparks when walking across rockier areas.

Entertaining on a long walk back after a skunking. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

One of the downsides to studs in the sole is stealth...or lack there of.  I fish a few spots that require walking down a paved road, and it sounds like an army marching in the middle of the night (especially if with a buddy or two).  I usually take the boots right off in that scenario which presents other potential problems.

Edited by FoliFish

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The only real issue comes into play if you use a boat to get to a fishing spot.  In the early spring I wear waders until the water warms up and have a second set of soles for my boot when on on my boat.  Korkers wading boots with removable soles.

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Change shoes to drive to other spot. Can't go into convenience store with studs. I don't the two would appreciate stud prints on their newly renovated wooden boardwalk and walkway access points.

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1 hour ago, hobobob said:

Change shoes to drive to other spot. Can't go into convenience store with studs. I don't the two would appreciate stud prints on their newly renovated wooden boardwalk and walkway access points.

 

I did go into the Cumby's BR in buzzards bay at 3AM once with my studded soles (and waders) on... but it was an emergency.

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1 hour ago, hobobob said:

Change shoes to drive to other spot. Can't go into convenience store with studs. I don't the two would appreciate stud prints on their newly renovated wooden boardwalk and walkway access points.

I do it, but walk very softly. :p

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Never mind the noise, it’s like walking around on ice. I’ve almost face planted a few times on hard floors. 

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I slid all the way into the soda cooler at the gas station down by Weekapaug in my studs. Learned to walk ever so carefully after that

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Downside?

 

Can't wear studded boots in a guided boat...wood or fiberglass.....or almost all civvie locations.

 

On large, hard, granite, SMOOTH rocks (most commonly found in rivers as in "river rock") they become the equivalent of ice skates.  ZERO penetration.....ZERO friction.  In that setting they are certifiably dangerous.  The wise wader places their foot BETWEEN rocks as the first choice.  Stepping ONto a hard, smooth rock with studs should be the LAST option.....and be associated with fear and trepidation.  Fractured, non-polished granite such as the Canal is quite different than polished smooth "river rock"

 

Not all studs are equal.  Those of the car tire design with a central tempered core aare worst on smooth rocks.  Soft aluminum, on the other hand, actually grabs and holds quite well on smooth granite.  But they wear faster.

 

In this part of the world, the pacific northwest, on big, fast steelhead and salmon rivers, studs are only marginally better than felt, and most would agree that the BEST option is basic felt (which IS good on smooth granite) with moderately sparse studding.  The fewer studs will catch on whatever there might be to catch on, and the felt deals with the smooth.  If the studding pattern is heavy, then on a flat rock only the studs are in contact with air between the rock and the felt.  Not good.

 

Choose your poison for the situation you face the most.

Edited by Peter Patricelli

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Carbide studs are slick on granite and basalt ,which is what they use on jetties, but work well on softer stone like shale, slate and sandstone.

Aluminum cleats conform to whatever stone they come into contact w/ and offer a good grip even on jetties.Although they wear down more quickly it is about safety so that is my choice for what to use.They'd be great for canal rocks.

I put a piece of indoor/outdoor carpeting in my drift boat to keep the cleats from beating on the bottom.

I like cleats when I drive from spot to spot while fishing,keeps my foot from slipping off my trucks' clutch when wet.

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I spent the extra money and got a second set of boots. I have gripstuds in my "canal" boots and normal rubber on my everything else boots. 

I like having options 

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