KennebecJake

Reel Quiz

Rate this topic

43 posts in this topic

On 3/1/2019 at 9:47 PM, KennebecJake said:

 

My conclusion is that the large arbor offers no advantage at all and that these two questions can't be considered independently.

:) 

 Your conclusion fails to take into account the weight of the extra backing  required on the small arbor reel.

 

The normal arbor reel will weigh several ounces more than the wide arbor reel when full (and even more once the backing gets wet).   Since a 4" reel is heavy to start with, the extra weight is becomes a factor well worth considering. 

 

And if you doubt the 2+ oz figure for backing, here are some pictures.  These spools are 3.5".  One has 2.25" of bone dry #20 micron (a bit less than 200yds as I recall.....certainly not more).   The empty spool weighs 3oz, the one with the backing 4.73 oz.   Now figure that a 4" reel will need another 1/2" of backing to get to the size of most wide arbors (2.75") and you can figure in at least another ounce of weight.  Then get it wet.    It seems to me you're talking 3-4oz of extra weight cost for using a narrow arbor reel.    To me, that seems significant disadvantage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMGP0110.jpg

IMGP0109.jpg

IMGP0106.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My apology for not being specific …….. I'd meant MECHANICAL advantage.

 

Reel weight of course would have to balance the rod.

 

In the case of the Pfleuger Medalist the original instructions explain how to add birdshot inside the arbor for ballast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ccb said:

If you were worried about weight ,You could add a filler to lighten it up. 

I've considered trying this in the past but have a hard time thinking of a light filler, such as cork, that would seal tightly enough against the side of the spool to prevent the backing from slipping between it and the spool face when under load.   

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder how many people will even think about any of this once the season rolls around. Oakie youre right it is a long winter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

Since it's snowing outside and the run off is gonna chill the water for days, lemme add to this nonsense.  I was under the impression that large arbor reels were originally created to increase line retrieve per crank.  Obviously a larger arbor reel should weight more than a small arbor reel of the same line capacity, but personally I always look for the largest arbor reels they sell in each line class. Just imagine fighting a 100 pound tarpon that makes several 100 yard runs on an old school small arbor reel that winds less than 5" of line per crank near the end of the backing.  Also consider with that same reel, after you get most of the line back and now the diameter of the line on the spool is double and how that effects the drag?   On a giant arbor reel, the difference in diameter of the backing from beginning to end can be as small as 20%.

Edited by ferret

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO - reel/rod balance is a myth.  I regularly test my fly rod blanks without reels attached enjoy the light weight.

Also - 200 yds is 2 football fields.  I'll take my chances with large arbor reels - always.

Herb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎3‎/‎1‎/‎2019 at 4:02 PM, TimS said:

They both pick up lines at exactly the same rate :)  The difference with the "small" arbor is it holds more line. Let's assume the large arbor holds 300 yds of fly line and backing. If you strip off 300yds of fly line and backing off both reels, it will take both reels the exact same number of turns to put the line back on the spool. If you strip off 350 yards of fly line and backing off both reels...oops...you'd be outta line with the large arbor reel :)

 

TimS

exactly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎3‎/‎3‎/‎2019 at 8:11 AM, VeeRay56 said:

First we must define “wide arbor model”. The 4” diameter reels are constant. Is wide arbor increasing the “axle” diameter or does it mean that the reel frame is just wider (thickness).

 

if the axle is the same and the reel is just wider, then the retrieval rate is the same. 

 

If the the axle is larger, then the large arbor will pick up line more quickly, but at a cost of overall backing and line storage.  

 

 

yes "axle"

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/3/2019 at 10:01 PM, HL said:

IMO - reel/rod balance is a myth.  I regularly test my fly rod blanks without reels attached enjoy the light weight.

Also - 200 yds is 2 football fields.  I'll take my chances with large arbor reels - always.

Herb

I’m with Herb, and your retrieve rate is exactly the same until the large arbor is empty, after that who cares!

JC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎3‎/‎5‎/‎2019 at 8:43 PM, JonC said:

I’m with Herb, and your retrieve rate is exactly the same until the large arbor is empty, after that who cares!

JC

Bingo - Correct answer! (And you are right that I don't care but the guy with the large arbor might not be so happy at that point.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a follow-up...…...just loaded a new Echo Base reel with 100yds 30# Micron and a Rio Outbound Short Intermediate 8WF line and the last few turns finally jammed the spool. Removed approximately 30yds and there is just enough room (maybe 3/16th gap to spare - max). I'm guessing my 1495-1/2 Pfleugers take about double that with the same line. Both reels cost about $35 (Echo new and Pfleuger used).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.