Thumb-Burner

Heavy vs. light.. pros and cons???

36 posts in this topic

About to buy my first kayak for freshwater fishing in lakes.  I’ve narrowed it down to two models that have good reviews that i can afford.  Major difference is that one is 10’ and about 55 lbs and the other is 12’ and about 78#’s.   

 

Assuming bigger and heavier will be more stable (both are pretty wide at about 34 inches) what can you tell me about how to choose between the two?   Is a 78#’er going to be a beast to load and move on my own?  Is there likely little difference in stability on the water?    

 

I really think i want the larger one but i really don’t want to end up with something i can’t get to the water!!

 

any thoughts appreciated.

 

the two boats are the Pelican Catch 100 and the Sun Dolphin Boss SS (12’er)

 

again, lakes and ponds only..   no current and no saltwater.

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It's not just the width of the kayak, but also the hull design. I'm not familiar with either but I'm sure theres plenty of YouTube videos of each kayak on there. 

 

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I think my real question should be, how big a pain is it to lug around a 78# kayak vs. a 55#’er?   Will be loading on top of a small suv and typically having to take it 200 yards or less (sometimes lots less) to the water to launch...

 

 

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I switched from a mid 60# kayak to a 50 and its a noticeable difference, I can throw that thing around and move it no problem now. I also car top on a small suv with J racks, so if you have a trailer it probably won't be that bad to move the extra weight, I just have to get it over my head, but if you are car topping it is something to think about.

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34 mins ago, kevbo1756 said:

I switched from a mid 60# kayak to a 50 and its a noticeable difference, I can throw that thing around and move it no problem now. I also car top on a small suv with J racks, so if you have a trailer it probably won't be that bad to move the extra weight, I just have to get it over my head, but if you are car topping it is something to think about.

Very helpful.. what about the difficulty or lack thereof on lugging it to and from the water?  I do not have a trailer.  I’ll be putting it on top of my CRV

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I have a Rav 4 so very similar, if you use the Jracks you have to lift it, if you are just laying across the bars or the roof itself you can probably slide it on if needed.

 

When I unload I put it on a cart and I honestly didn't think that it was that bad as lifting it over my head to put on top of the car, but it did drag more in softer sand, if your fishing lakes I'd imagine you are launching from grass or cement launches so if you use a cart I don't think it will matter that much, once it is on the cart going to the water with moving it over the harder surface.

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"Fat bottom girls make the rocking world go round..."

 

Only know my 80 lb outback.   Average bout 300 trips a year (cartop).    Guess it all depends on what you want and need.

 

 

 

 

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A better question would be how old are you and what kind of shape are you in. 20lbs is a good amont  extra weight at 40 years old  At 50 years old it is an even bigger deal. At 60 years old it is a world of difference. Just one old man’s humble opinion.

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I'm pretty green when it comes to kayaks but IMO 78# could be a lot to car top, carry to the water, etc. That is, if you don't have anything like a cart or load assist for your roof rack. I don't use any of that stuff - I'm 6' ~200lb and my 70lb Revo is about as heavy as I would want to go. It might be OK initially getting it on the car and getting it to the water, it's at the end of a long day of paddling that it will really kill you. 

 

If you get something that you can barely manage on a good day, you will probably end up talking yourself out of going a lot more often than if you had the lighter option. That's how it went for me, anyways. I bought a 90lb canoe thinking it would be great to take my young son out. Sure, I can drag it around and muscle it up on the roof with a good deal of effort. But, I found it to be too much hassle on a regular basis so we usually take our inflatable unless another adult is coming.

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17 mins ago, dbjpb said:

A better question would be how old are you and what kind of shape are you in. 20lbs is a good amont  extra weight at 40 years old  At 50 years old it is an even bigger deal. At 60 years old it is a world of difference. Just one old man’s humble opinion.

Great point.  Overweight 52 year old with bad knees.  I'm thinking go lighter and i can change later.  Would rather not get discouraged right away

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8 mins ago, drmevo said:

I'm pretty green when it comes to kayaks but IMO 78# could be a lot to car top, carry to the water, etc. That is, if you don't have anything like a cart or load assist for your roof rack. I don't use any of that stuff - I'm 6' ~200lb and my 70lb Revo is about as heavy as I would want to go. It might be OK initially getting it on the car and getting it to the water, it's at the end of a long day of paddling that it will really kill you. 

 

If you get something that you can barely manage on a good day, you will probably end up talking yourself out of going a lot more often than if you had the lighter option. That's how it went for me, anyways. I bought a 90lb canoe thinking it would be great to take my young son out. Sure, I can drag it around and muscle it up on the roof with a good deal of effort. But, I found it to be too much hassle on a regular basis so we usually take our inflatable unless another adult is coming.

That's sound logic

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I

1 hour ago, Thumb-Burner said:

Great point.  Overweight 52 year old with bad knees.  I'm thinking go lighter and i can change later.  Would rather not get discouraged right away

Go light, but honestly, you can do better than that Pelican for $650. It's so short and wide, it's gonna be one slow dog. Don't focus on wide=stable. Low seat also equals stable.  A classic beginner boat for you, in addition to the Prowler 13 mentioned, is the older Tarpon 120 and the various clones out there including the Pescador 12, the Pompano 12, and Eagle Talon. These are often on the used market, and Kenco has that older Pescador for $580. Where are you?

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2 mins ago, gellfex said:

I

Go light, but honestly, you can do better than that Pelican for $650. It's so short and wide, it's gonna be one slow dog. Don't focus on wide=stable. Low seat also equals stable.  A classic beginner boat for you, in addition to the Prowler 13 mentioned, is the older Tarpon 120 and the various clones out there including the Pescador 12, the Pompano 12, and Eagle Talon. These are often on the used market, and Kenco has that older Pescador for $580. Where are you?

In North Carolina.

 

I obviously have no idea what I'm doing. What you say makes some sense. I was under the assumption that the seat on the pelican catch 100 that would have me sitting up higher than most all the others I had seen would be a huge advantage while fishing. That was mostly what drew me to eat in addition to the fact that it is wide and I assumed that meant stable

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