Captain Haddock

Ditch bottom jigging

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18 posts in this topic

Posted (edited) · Report post

depends where you are and how fast the current is running 2 up to 5 or 6

Edited by Stewie

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You have to put in your time at the different spots in the different Tides you can feel feel the jig bouncing on the bottom when you got it right if you're not losing them you're not in the right spot

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If you jig for a whole tide you'll run the gamut of jig weight.  2-6 oz usually.  2 oz as the current is starting to build, going slightly heavier as the current speeds up, going heavy when it's full flow and then putting on lighter jigs as the current begins to once again slow down.

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1 hour ago, BrianBM said:

Since this thread is open ...

 

Is there a generally preferred shape for a Canal jig head? 

I'd go with a classic jig head. Most of my canal jigs are rigged on 3, 4 and 5 oz heads with 2 and 6 oz heads used occasionally.

 

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Knowing what ounce weight to use is only the first step. Knowing how to finely work the jig within the zone is another skill entirely.

 

I'm not the person to post on that because I barely make rent here.. (¬_¬)... but I'd like to see more discussion of techniques, vs just simple "2-6oz leads are the way to go.

It's really much more than that.

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4 hours ago, Captain Haddock said:

Whats a good weight for a jig head to bounce off the bottom?

2oz at slack, 3oz when the current starts to move, 4oz as the current gets close to full speed, 5oz, at deeper spots at full current, 6oz at deep spots,  on moon tides, when it's windy, stormy and the current is really ripping. 

 

YMMV

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It all depends on what's on the back of the jig.  A sparse BT without a trailer will sink a lot faster than a giant chunk of buoyant rubber.

 

That being said, most of the time its 3 to 6 oz of lead like others say.

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10 hours ago, Sandbar1 said:

I'd go with a classic jig head. Most of my canal jigs are rigged on 3, 4 and 5 oz heads with 2 and 6 oz heads used occasionally.

 

20180611_205613.jpg.1a337474a588ca8db2eacd209081507b.jpg

20180611_223617.jpg.694e3d4c2147ef29f5ca8ed71c9fa0d0.jpg

One cool option is buy the jigs from Frothy Lures and tie your own bucktails.  I have seen some sick custom mackerel bucktails made with his jigs.  I really like his bucktails in general for the Canal.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Keep in mind, cast out 40yds , 70yds and 90yd+  ; the weight of jig (2-5oz) , your rod(s) and reel will matter more with current speed change ; spend your the time to learn or go with someone u can learn from is your best option;  telling you to use 5oz is meaningless if your rod can not handle 5oz; u will just donate it to canal

Edited by fishing1975

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1 hour ago, fishing1975 said:

Keep in mind, cast out 40yds , 70yds and 90yd+  ; the weight of jig (2-5oz) , your rod(s) and reel will matter more with current speed change ; spend your the time to learn or go with someone u can learn from is your best option;  telling you to use 5oz is meaningless if your rod can not handle 5oz; u will just donate it to canal

That's a great point that's often overlooked. 40,70,90 gives you different sweeps. 

Also work jig to your feet. 

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2-6 oz should cover you, like stated previously the presentation attached to the jig is just as important.. a 4 oz with small rubber will sink faster then a 5 oz with bulky large rubber.. one trick i use especially at night is to cast out up current, Once the jig hits water lightly grip the line with your index and thumb as it is coming off  of your spool, you will feel a sharp distinct tap in the line when you have hit bottom.

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13 hours ago, rst3 said:

Knowing what ounce weight to use is only the first step. Knowing how to finely work the jig within the zone is another skill entirely.

 

I'm not the person to post on that because I barely make rent here.. (¬_¬)... but I'd like to see more discussion of techniques, vs just simple "2-6oz leads are the way to go.

It's really much more than that.

Carl Johansen wrote a good article in OTW titled Cape Cod Canal Structure Strategies.  You can find it in New England Stripers - A Fishing Anthology.  

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