tj7501

12V Battery Fire Hazard

14 posts in this topic

Posted (edited) · Report post

I did something stupid today and almost burned my house down, so just posting this as a PSA. I own 3 12V batteries that I recharge and use with my kayak on a regular basis. So I’m used to handling them. I had this 10 year old 12V battery that had come out of a Verizon FIOS ONT box that had been sitting on my basement floor. It had expired (ONT was beeping saying so), so I had replaced it with a new one years ago. As part of basement cleanup, I threw in a bunch of stuff in a clear heavy trash bag along with this old battery. As I was moving the bag around, I noticed a flash inside and a small flame. I quickly took the battery out and put out the fire. A metal scrap shorted the battery terminals and started a fire inside the bag. This really fraked me out. What if I had just left it in there and went upstairs or if what if I had used a black trash bag and did not see the flame? These things are hazardous, take extra care to make sure the terminals are protected and nothing conductive can possibly fall on them to start a fire.

Edited by tj7501

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stunned silence .... off to the garage to hot glue the terminals of 5 or 6 batteries buried under piles of flammable junk (paint cans, wood ... :worms:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely need to be careful with DC current/batteries although usually low voltage, most are high amperage ie car batteries, rechargeable tool batteries etc. direct short can cause instant ignition of nearby light combustibles...  I placed a 6V battery from a Surefire flashlight in my cup holder of my truck, came in contact with a dime and started a fire right in front of me ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, shark lobster said:

and just a tip about good batterys never ever leave them on a concrete floor!

This is old battery design advice..... this is no longer valid but the belief remains. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad no fire man. I once knocked over my 10 amp SLA and fell on a diamond plate tool box and had a spark show. Killed the battery too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Chicaneries said:

  I placed a 6V battery from a Surefire flashlight in my cup holder of my truck, came in contact with a dime and started a fire right in front of me ....

Had basically the same thing happen to me! Tossed some small battery pack into the console and then sometime later was smelling something burning. Stopped the car, looked under the hood, and couldn't figure it out! Felt like an idiot when I finally did.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Threw an old 9v that I replaced in a fire alarm in my pocket to throw out later on and forgot.

 

As I am watching TV, I notice that my leg is burning. With all the stuff in my pocket, keys,coins, etc., something shorted across terminals, that sucker got red hot.

 

Moral of the story...

 

Don't do that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My work office facility collects small batteries  (AA, AAA, cellphone etc) for recycling. I brought a box of assorted batteries and was given a roll of tape and was requested to tape terminals. I thought it was a joke, but the woman working there said it's UPS request as there are several cases trucks got of fire transporting buckets if "dead" batteries.

 

Also, just remember the story that keyfob/watch size batteries should be properly disposed (recycled) as they are very dangerous if you have small children in the house.   Swallowed batteries burn through a child’s esophagus in just 2 hours, leading to surgery, months with feeding and breathing tubes, and even death. About the size of a nickel, 20 mm, 3-volt lithium coin cells are the most hazardous as they are big enough to get stuck and burn faster. Secure battery compartments and keep loose batteries away from children.

 

Edited by oceanAddict

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At work the 9v all had to be taped to go in the recycling bins. Had a car battery in my truck bed years back going to get a new one. Someone pulled out in front of me and it slid forward with the terminals wedging under my aluminum toolbox. That was exciting 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.