codfish

How do stripers feed?

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95 posts in this topic

2 hours ago, rst3 said:

Video is lost in my files.. but once saw and shot and a mink diving for,  and then dragging, a 14+" tog back to its pups. (Seems they fish at slack, fwiw)

Is like to see that video.  I’ve seen them jump in for squid and minnows 

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9 mins ago, jhndoe said:

Is like to see that video.  I’ve seen them jump in for squid and minnows 

Not my mink/tog video.. but here's one that's even better

Mink eating gull at CCC

 

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Mink are nasty! 

 

Back to bass: I love chumming them up. If I can locate very fresh mackerel, then throw a nice chunk in a decent spot, I almost always see a bass eat it. 

 

They appear out of nowhere when its good. Often it is very tough to get one to hit a piece with a hook even when they are nailing free pieces. 

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6 hours ago, bdowning said:

The color perception comment was interesting. It implies that those pretty colors that some of us use to pour or paint for baits probably are not distinguished by the bass unless the lure is at very close range. Although I don't really know if that would change how I fish. 

 

I think a bass's "hearing" is more of a vibration detector than an audible sound detector. 

I think sound matters except in the Canal way to much back round sound.

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1 hour ago, rst3 said:

Not my mink/tog video.. but here's one that's even better

Mink eating gull at CCC

 

Feel bad for the gull......

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4 hours ago, jason colby said:

To answer the original question specifically: They get their nose as close as they can to the meal and then open their mouth. The rapid opening of the large space creates suction which puts the bait well inside. Then it's "clamp and gulp". That is why you really only need one second from the "hit" (the clamp, tap, contact) to hook a fish in the gullet. I see a large percentage of people wait far too long to set up....JC

 

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7 hours ago, 1ife said:

 

hahah that's great and some people are worried about Mono vs Flouro...

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10 hours ago, rst3 said:

No doubt. 

 

That gull had a really, *really* bad day 

A few years ago i saw a mink drag a live herring at least 200 yds back to wherever it lived. All on the canal riprap. The fish was as big as the mink lol. Talk abt an animal thats successfully adapted to its environment !

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16 hours ago, R.R. Bridge Fisher said:

20180916_102757.jpg

Hey... I recognize that bike!  Lol

The post fillet autopsy revealed that this fish was eating only mussels.

As for the stripes, If they are hungry or blitzing on bait I think it is more of an instinctive reaction bite to vibration or visual profile.  If you hook a lone fish with a full belly.... you did everything perfect ; )

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Sight, sound, smells.....

Think about the whitewater among the boulders at night.

How can a fish even swim in that turmoil?

Nevermind see, detect sound among the crashing surf or smell something amidst all the other scents being pounded out of the rocks?

 

One of my best fish ever hit in a noreaster, pitch black dark, 8 foot crashers, whitewater out 50 foot from shore, in a boulder field.

Black plug.

That has always impressed me. That a +30 lb fish could even navigate in that crashing surf, that it could detect a 7 inch plastic plug, black, in that pitch black swirling chaos, and then accurately track and attack it.

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Some really awesome footage here. I want to drop my GoPro down at RP but worried I'll lose it. Wonder if these is a way to fashion some type of stabilizing "wings" to get it to sit still. 

 

Another thing that always blow my mind is how cautious stripers are when going after lures/live bait. Got to wonder how many times I've been thiiiiiiis close to hooking into a real big one. Next time I feel like I'm just throwing my lure or fly into empty water I'm going to really focus on the retrieve, because more often than not, a bass is just sitting there watching it. 

 

Same thing with drone footage. So many times I see someone burning a topwater bait in and the bass just follow lazily behind it. Gotta think that's why occasional long dead stops seem to work so well. 

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