DoorGunner

Why my hawks are fat.

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Flower pot on the deck that I use for a bird feeder. No woods or trees nearby so all I ever seem to get are sparrows but the little guys need a break during the winter months. At the other end of the long deck was a party boat whose owner fed the pigeons every day so the pigeons stayed there and the sparrows here. Until now since he sold his boat. The pigeons quickly took over my feeder and simply kicked the sparrows out. So I took some fence and put it around the pot so the pigeons couldn't get in. They didn't give up and hang on the fence to reach in for food. When they feed like this they aren't paying attntion and our resident hawks appreciate it. Every week they pick off a few easy targets. :)DSCF5564.JPG.688959b5ec6009d7f7c2a0a5847bd7fb.JPG

 

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33 mins ago, robtf said:

Hawks seem to love pigeons and mourning doves.  Guess there's good meat on 'em.

Pigeons and Doves are good eats :th:

 

So I hear...

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55 mins ago, robtf said:

Hawks seem to love pigeons and mourning doves.  Guess there's good meat on 'em.

I read somewhere, probably on the back of a box of Froot Loops, that a pigeon is the perfect meal for a hawk, at least the larger ones like Cooper's and Red-Tails: a pigeon is small enough that the pigeon can take it out without worrying about getting hurt, but big enough that they deliver enough calories to make the effort worthwhile.

 

I remember when this happened at 8th & Market in Philly a few years back: I'd walked by that spot like a half-hour before it happened, and was pissed that I missed it:
 

 

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most redtailed hawks prey on rodents and squirrels and ground dwelling things like rabits and chipmunks. it seems the ones in urban areas are becoming quite adept at taking down pigeons though and i'd bet most of their diets are pigeons now.

 

that was probably one of the offspring of the pair of birds that was nesting on the franklin. i used to see those birds all the time, often right above the heads of pedestrians that had no idea they were even there. urban life is tough thought. more than a few of the offspring never made it to adulthood and i think one of the pair got killed too. they don't nest on the franklin anymore either. i see more cooper's hawks now here too, which was much less of an urban bird 15 years ago. 

 

amazing how fast some things can change and adapt.

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When you mist net birds of prey, a caged pigeon is the bait. :eek: Where I work we fly pigeons, there are plenty of red tails around, but Cooper’s hawks take a couple per month.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

51 mins ago, rocco said:

most redtailed hawks prey on rodents and squirrels and ground dwelling things like rabits and chipmunks. it seems the ones in urban areas are becoming quite adept at taking down pigeons though and i'd bet most of their diets are pigeons now.

 

that was probably one of the offspring of the pair of birds that was nesting on the franklin. i used to see those birds all the time, often right above the heads of pedestrians that had no idea they were even there. urban life is tough thought. more than a few of the offspring never made it to adulthood and i think one of the pair got killed too. they don't nest on the franklin anymore either. i see more cooper's hawks now here too, which was much less of an urban bird 15 years ago. 

 

amazing how fast some things can change and adapt.

The fall before last, I was walking through the park behind Independence Hall, and there was a hawk, I think a red-tail (though you know my record with raptor identification :D) on one of the lampposts along the paths by the Commodore John Barry statue.

This thing was only about 8 feet off the ground, and it was big -- and 99% of the people walking by had no clue whatsoever that it was there. I stopped and watched for a few minutes, if only to prove the old Yogi Berra saying: you can really observe a lot just by watching. :th:

 

 

20171006_150641.jpg.9167b6f1a35838588bfef5376ee09de1.jpg

Edited by Belmo
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10 mins ago, Belmo said:

The fall before last, I was walking through the park behind Independence Hall, and there was a hawk, I think a red-tail (though you know my record with raptor identification :D) on one of the lampposts along the paths by the Commodore John Barry statue.

This thing was only about 8 feet off the ground, and it was big -- and 99% of the people walking by had no clue whatsoever that it was there. I stopped and watched for a few minutes, if only to pro20171006_150641.jpg.9167b6f1a35838588bfef5376ee09de1.jpgve the old Yogi Berra saying: you can really observe a lot just by watching. :th:

:laugh:

 

yeah, that's a red-tailed hawk, and its only funny because you are colored-blind :freak: 

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I have a few hawks that live around my house. We’re always watching them hunt.

This summer one was sitting up on my roof ridge. I caught a small bass out of the pond and threw it on the grass for the hawk.

It immediately flew down to investigate but would not pick it up. It appeared dumbfounded as the bass flipped around.7573E234-45B2-4B0E-8C4C-71724EFB68B7.jpeg.e5a573d64c366d7f22c9db8f6aef8159.jpeg

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