tdok

What do 4/0, 5/0, etc. reel equates to?

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I kept on seeing references to 4/0, 5/0, etc. reel in articles but I have no idea what they mean.  I searched around with no success.  Does anyone knows?

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This most commonly refers to the penn senator line of reels. For example a penn senator 113h is also known as a 4/0 and holds about 450 yards of 30 pound mono.  

114 = 6/0

115 = 9/0 

etc etc 

 

While catalogs and websites often use the 11X nomenclature, the 4/0, 6/0, 9/0 12/0 nomenclature is more commonly used in discussion. 

 

Everol also uses this nomenclature for some of their reels. 

 

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My understanding is that the "0" was originally intended to serve not as a numeral, but as the letter "O", designating that these were "O"cean reels.

 

Today, Penn may be the last manufacturer using the designation, while others (including Penn, in its International series), designating reels by line class, although the increasing use of braid is beginning to make those designations somewhat obsolete.  In the old days, the "/0" designation was used by most companies.  #3/0s were generally considered the "right" reel for 20-pound line, #4/0s for 30, #6/0s for 50, #9/0s for 80 and #12/0s for 130, although anglers frequently varied from that standard.  As is true when we talk about today's "2500" or "4000" class spinning reels, although the numbers may be the same across manufacturers, the actual size of the reels varied. .  

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Generally, yes, unless they're referring to the Penn Senator series.  But you can translate the /0s to the line class, and the rest of the article would still probably work (unless they start talking about linen lines and hickory rods, in which case...)

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Posted (edited) · Report post

The O is for odd.

 

The gearing and drag system for that size mono. 4/0=40 pound. 5/0=50 pound.

Any less or more is playing at your own risk. You're now out the box.

30 pound on the 4/0 with a high drag and it's pop!

60 pound on the 5/0 and it's wear and tear.

You can do it. I give you permission. It's your reel.

Edited by SandSpike1

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I've read that Ocean City used the " /O"  designation before Penn did.  Otto Henze was originally an Ocean City reel designer. 

 

Daiwa sort of hinted at the " /O" designation in labeling the Sealine reels, which they introduced as products specifically to compete with the Senators. The Daiwa 900H in my basement takes 400 yards of 80 lb. mono, which is - remarkably enough - about the same as a contemporary 9/0 Senator.

 

IMHO the Sealines were better then the contemporary Senators. They used a one-piece frame. 
 

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14 hours ago, BrianBM said:

I've read that Ocean City used the " /O"  designation before Penn did.  Otto Henze was originally an Ocean City reel designer. 

 

Daiwa sort of hinted at the " /O" designation in labeling the Sealine reels, which they introduced as products specifically to compete with the Senators. The Daiwa 900H in my basement takes 400 yards of 80 lb. mono, which is - remarkably enough - about the same as a contemporary 9/0 Senator.

 

IMHO the Sealines were better then the contemporary Senators. They used a one-piece frame. 
 

The Ocean City comment makes sense.  People today forget just how big a player Ocean City was in the mid-20th Century..

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16 hours ago, BrianBM said:

I've read that Ocean City used the " /O"  designation before Penn did.  Otto Henze was originally an Ocean City reel designer. 

 

Daiwa sort of hinted at the " /O" designation in labeling the Sealine reels, which they introduced as products specifically to compete with the Senators. The Daiwa 900H in my basement takes 400 yards of 80 lb. mono, which is - remarkably enough - about the same as a contemporary 9/0 Senator.

 

IMHO the Sealines were better then the contemporary Senators. They used a one-piece frame. 
 

I have never heard of Ocean City. Just learned something else today.

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On 2/10/2019 at 3:31 PM, tdok said:

I guess that means any article referencing the */0 reel might be really out date :)

 

6 mins ago, tdok said:

I have never heard of Ocean City. Just learned something else today.

Out of date, never heard of, I guess that shows you don't really know about these reels.

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23 mins ago, b4loran said:

 

Out of date, never heard of, I guess that shows you don't really know about these reels.

You're right. I absolutely don't. I'm trying to get into conventional reel so I had been reading up on things and familiarizing myself.  I came across a few very good information but they referenced the */0 and it was hard to know what are the specs of the reels without knowing the nomenclature.

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tdok, welcome to our happy but somewhat disfunctional fishing family. There's always a cranky cousin around.

 

b4loran, believe it or not, there was a time when none of us knew anything. Perhaps even you?

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