abaus3

First Saltwater Rod - 8wt or 9wt?

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A true 9 wt rod would be my choice, enough to cast medium to heavy weight  permit flies, enough to fight small to medium (50lbs ) tarpon size, great for bonefish on windy days.

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Thanks for all the input! Of course everyone has different opinions... I'm leaning towards a 9wt. Keep the opinions coming. Headed to Key West, Cayman Islands, and Hawaii this year!

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18 hours ago, qecfly said:

I would go with a fast 8wt.  You can line it with an 8wt for low wind and smaller flies or throw a 9 or 10wt line on for wind and bigger flies. If you have the money then get an 8wt and 10wt. Either way you will need two spools or two reels which drives up the cost of everything.

8 or 9wt will land anything coming out of the Great Lakes.

Will likely just use the fly rod for saltwater on vacations. At home is usually trolling lake michigan in the boat.

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21 mins ago, abaus3 said:

Thanks for all the input! Of course everyone has different opinions... I'm leaning towards a 9wt. Keep the opinions coming. Headed to Key West, Cayman Islands, and Hawaii this year!

 

Someone else might be able to chime in, but Hawaii is known for big fish, deeper water, and significant trade winds.

 

If you are still on the fence I would reach out to some guides in those areas and see what they use.

 

Excited to hear about your experiences on these trips.

 

Good luck!

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3 mins ago, BrokeOff said:

 

Someone else might be able to chime in, but Hawaii is known for big fish, deeper water, and significant trade winds.

 

If you are still on the fence I would reach out to some guides in those areas and see what they use.

 

Excited to hear about your experiences on these trips.

 

Good luck!

I heard the same thing about Hawaii. Good idea on reaching out to some guides.

Got my first bonefish last year in Belize, now i'm hooked!

 

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3 mins ago, Mike Oliver said:

Hope you find time to learn how to cast either your 8 or 9 wt. Salt water is the toughest gig of all..Enjoy.

 

mike

Very true! My first time in the saltwater game was in Belize last year. Bonefish are tough! Of course the first one i landed, the rod came apart and i reeled it in with just the butt section and the reel until the guide jumped in and brought the rest of the rod back to the boat. somehow the fish stayed in the line!

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4 hours ago, abaus3 said:

Headed to Key West, Cayman Islands, and Hawaii this year!

Just a head's up...........unless something has changed since last year, you will not be allowed to carry your rod onto the plane when returning from Grand Cayman.  Plan to check it. 

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I favor 9# rods for general SW use inshore . SW you can count on wind and larger flies on occasion , many time you have to drive that fly to a moving target , add a bigger bug to that equation my bet is on the 9  getting it done faster and more efficiently ! Also I would add that if your a marginal caster then lean heavier , less timing issues . It's a bit heavy for bones but  mid size tarpon  , permit , Stripers ,snapper , jacks ,  etc no issues . I've personally taken several sails on a 9# no issues ! 

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throwing my two cents in, I have two 9w's and an 8w, hardly ever throw the 8. I'm throwing in the NE catching schoolie stripers to 25+ stripers,  you never know whats going to hit the fly. 9w is better when the wind is blowing, and you can get in a larger fish more quickly.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

You would be real safe using the 9 weight as a starting point and then just throw in a 8 & 10 weight as things progress. You never know, sometimes a 7&11 weight come into play. It is about the numbers game $$$'s , buy no deeper than you need for the moment at hand.

 

FT

 

Edited by Fishin Technician

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Posted (edited) · Report post

On 2/8/2019 at 10:08 PM, BrokeOff said:

If I were you I would think about where I will fish, what I will fish for, the flies I will use, and the conditions I expect to encounter.

 

Also, this is important, some rods have very similar actions all the way through the line while other rods make a noticeable change in the action are the 9 or 10 wt.  Certainly by 11 and 12 wt most rod designers are thinking about characteristics that make a good tarpon stick.  Because of this you might want to try an 8 and 9 wt in each of the rods that you put on a final short list.  You might like the 8 wt in rod X, the 9 wt in rod Y and the 8 wt in rod Z.

 

Additionally, if you can cast, you might want to try a variety of lines on the rods you like, from a short aggressive taper up to a long bellied true to weight line (what makes your 8 or 9 wt an 8 or 9 wt).

 

Guys use lots of different rods for bonefish from 7-9 usually.  I don’t have much experience with them but I’ve used 8/9/10 wt.  Based on everything I’ve read I was certain a 10 wt is too big and would spook any bonefish.  I think I got 4 bonefish up to 5# in the Keys on a 10 wt.  Long leaders, heavy crabs, looking for permit...bonefish didn’t care about the rod wt.  They did care that they could see the fly, right place right time.

 

Another side note, many permit anglers are using a 9 wt these days.  Plenty are throwing AFFTA true to weight lines.  It carries a heavy crab well.  It carries a clouser well (my favorite for stripers).  It carries a 50 ft bonefish taper well in the wind.

 

You can fish 8 wt stuff on a 9 wt but you can’t fish 9 wt stuff on an 8 wt.  My vote is for 9 wt.

The last paragraph is totally wrong, if anything you have it “Bass Ackwards”

 

In full disclosure I have been fishing my entire life and for Stripers I started out with  9 wt and that was my go to rod for  20 years, in fact I still use it today but my go to rod now is the 8 wt and I find it to be much more enjoyable than the 9.

 

I only wished I started using the 8 wt much sooner, there is not a fish that I could not land on a 9 that I could not land with a 8 wt.

 

I am on my iPad , if I was on my PC I could show you what an 8 wt is capable of catching.

 

The  recommendation of starting with an 8 and jumping two line weights is solid advice

 

The other thing you need to consider is the Striper fishery has changed dramatically and what you will be catching today is much smaller fish, the 8 wt will make it more enjoyable and a big fish fight will be enhanced.

 

Good luck with your choice.

Edited by bonefishdick

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32 mins ago, bonefishdick said:

The last paragraph is totally wrong, if anything you have it “Bass Ackwards”

 

In full disclosure I have been fishing my entire life and for Stripers I started out with  9 wt and that was my go to rod for  20 years, in fact I still use it today but my go to rod now is the 8 wt and I find it to be much more enjoyable than the 9.

 

I only wished I started using the 8 wt much sooner, there is not a fish that I could not land on a 9 that I could not land with a 8 wt.

 

I am on my iPad , if I was on my PC I could show you what an 8 wt is capable of catching.

 

The  recommendation of starting with an 8 and jumping two line weights is solid advice

 

The other thing you need to consider is the Striper fishery has changed dramatically and what you will be catching today is much smaller fish, the 8 wt will make it more enjoyable and a big fish fight will be enhanced.

 

Good luck with your choice.

 

Yup, we totally disagree.

 

I select the rod weight based on the line  I’m throwing.  I select the line based on the fly I’m using and the wind conditions I’m casting in.  It has nothing to do with the fish I’m fighting.  I don’t fish for migratory tarpon or tuna.

 

I find it difficult to put a heavy crab or shrimp pattern exactly where it needs to go with an 8 wt and true to wt line.  There is just more shock in the system when casting those flies and the oval cast needs to be introduced more with an 8 wt than 9 wt.  With a 9 wt I don’t need to use the oval cast, I can keep my loops tight, the line cuts through the wind and gets the fly to the target accurately.

 

I believe the OP asked about bonefish rods for KW and Hawaii.

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Brokeoff,

I’m wondering what true to weight lines people are using, what I hear about favored lines is that they’re pretty much all overweight.

JC

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