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bob_G

Birds of spring

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Just now, mikez2 said:

Pileated as well as the other woodpeckers, bluebirds, owls, dozens of small cavity nesters and flying squirrels to name several, all have increased since beaver came back.

All that standing dead wood is low income housing for wildlife. 

Forgot wood ducks.

So many good trees in the beaver swamps, woodies don't even use boxes any more.

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6 hours ago, bdowning said:

Most winters up here in central mass we get sporadic flocks of robins. It helps that we have crabapple trees. Cedar waxwings are also common up here in winter. 

 

And pileated woodpeckers have become much more common in winter. I only run into them in the woods while trail walking but they are there. I dont remember nearly as many even 10 yrs ago, except in apr and may during nesting season. 

The pileated have really increased dramatically the last couple decades. I used to explore all the woods in and around Quabbin and central Ma when I was young. Often spening the entire day walking the ridges. It was a couple years before I saw my first pileated. After seeing it, I ran to my bird guide to identify what I saw. 

Their numbers have really spiked in the last 10 years. They've even become more accustomed to the presence of humans. This fall while bird hunting I had a couple land and feed under 50 yards from my dog and I.

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1 hour ago, mikez2 said:

Pileated as well as the other woodpeckers, bluebirds, owls, dozens of small cavity nesters and flying squirrels to name several, all have increased since beaver came back.

All that standing dead wood is low income housing for wildlife. 

Nature as it should be...……..

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You guys seem to love your swamps. :laugh: Sadly most of the beautiful upland bird covers and wild trout streams my dad showed me 50 years ago are now under 6' of beaver swamp.

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The ever reality of birding at its best , is when you first see the Soaring Eagle in the skies of the summer Or better yet the nesting of the first piping plover on he beach . Seeing the soaring of the first Terns and Herring gulls along with some Shear waters. The ever searching Hawks and the sounds of all that give us all something to say spring is here . Then at times the turkey vultures make there appearance in the park as they feed on the dead animal life left over from the winter losses. The white and blue Heron as they walk the floor of the canal in search of food . Thems are the birds of summer for me and a few more    

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One bird that marks the beginning of the Herring Migration is the beloved Osprey as it stalks the herring swimming against the current and capturing one to take back to its pole house in the sky to feed its young. 

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20 hours ago, bob_G said:

You guys seem to love your swamps. :laugh: Sadly most of the beautiful upland bird covers and wild trout streams my dad showed me 50 years ago are now under 6' of beaver swamp.

:banghd::banghd:

I can't type long posts without the Samsung popup hijack lose everything infuriating pia.

 

Anyway, Bob please pm a couple of dead streams for me to explore. 

Not bustin balls, seriously want to see for myself. 

Phew, quick hit send.....

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20 hours ago, bob_G said:

You guys seem to love your swamps. :laugh: Sadly most of the beautiful upland bird covers and wild trout streams my dad showed me 50 years ago are now under 6' of beaver swamp.

All the upland bird cover I know, being upland, is high and dry between the swamps.

Sadly 75% is landscaped human destroyed and will never see another grouse for eternity. 

The cover that is left, looks perfect, very few to zero grouse. Don't know what wiped out grouse in our suburbs but it wasn't beaver. Plenty cover with no birds.

The Oxbow still has grouse, ****load of upland cover, hundreds of acres of beaver swamp.

Grouse are on the list of birds more often found near active beaver.

 

Woodcock like beaves pretty well I should think....

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Another sign often seen at the east end in the spring is the last of the loons calling away before they head where ever it is they go

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11 mins ago, bdowning said:

First redwinged blackbirds heard this morning in central Mass.

We woke up to the sounds of snow plows rumbling by the house...…………………….

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