stormy monday

Toad Question

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I never heard of a toad fly before. But now my mind is spinning... I wonder if a river coho might slam one? I've caught coho on a mouse and a gurgler.

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There’s a few tarpon patterns that will work on backbay/sodbank stripers in Jersey. It doesn’t surprise me that they would work on the Cape or anywhere else stripers feed . Fish are fish , if it looks tasty , they ll eat it. Bill J 

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On 2/8/2019 at 7:24 AM, Seadogg said:

That looks good, but I’d maybe use a little less material on the head. That’ll make it easier to trim after, too. I’d personally trim that head a little bit more. This is one I tied recently. Good luck, man. 

3958B360-76D4-45BA-8D48-F15BCC04C4D2.jpeg

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DA04EA59-748E-4D15-BC96-85962D541323.jpeg

do those lil bitty eyes really matter or is it for aesthetics?

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Just now, slip n slide said:

do those lil bitty eyes really matter or is it for aesthetics?

To be honest I’m not sure. They’re mono, so maybe they add a touch of buoyancy? 

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3 mins ago, Seadogg said:

To be honest I’m not sure. They’re mono, so maybe they add a touch of buoyancy? 

yeah,had to look closely at a number of pics but it does seem they are all mono

toads look more crustacean than fish,eyes in the back maybe?

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I would make the marabou tail a bit longer.  I tie and fish them in all colors, the standard chartreuse, brown/black, purple/black, etc.  I may as well admit it, this is one of my favorite all around flies for all fish, fresh and salt water.  In freshwater I've caught freshwater bass (large and small mouth), carp, gar, etc, saltwater I've caught stripers, tarpon, jacks, bluefish, etc.  It's one of my go-to flies especially if I'm sight casting (blind casting not so much unless I know there's fish in the area).  However in the Keys I would not use it for Tarpon as they are pretty jaded unless you are talking early season poons before they are beat up on too much.  During the migration the worm is the fly to use.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

On 2/19/2019 at 5:27 PM, slip n slide said:

yeah,had to look closely at a number of pics but it does seem they are all mono

toads look more crustacean than fish,eyes in the back maybe?

The "original" idea of the tarpon toad was to design a fly with the right dynamics and materials that would cause it to hover or suspend in the water column and track as straight as possible horizontally when retrieved instead of bobbing up and down, hence the flat head and plastic eyes instead of bead chain or bumbbell eyes. The purpose is to keep the fly in the tarpon's strike zone for as long as possible without it sinking since tarpon are known to habitually track a fly for a good distance before they strike. Having to sometimes lead them a great distance combined with the fact that they always look straight or up and never look down to feed, a sinking fly would most certainly defeat the purpose. A good illustration of the fly swimming under water can be seen in the attached video at the 1:57 minute compared to the action of a crab fly.  

 

Edited by sidelock

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If the Toad is a bait imitation what is it? Sidelock, very good looking! Do those swim hook point down or up?

 

Esa

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I never really thought about what the Toad imitates, all I know is the fly works, that is what matters to me, it is also a great Striper fly.

 

Sidelock those are some nice looking Toads

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You can also tie these with foam strips instead of EP fibres, same silhouette just rides even higher in the water creating a slight wake. Never tried one so no idea if they work for tarpon but I bet blues and stripers would love them to bits. My guess is that they look like shrimp or crabs but who knows what a tarpon thinks. 

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23 hours ago, sidelock said:

The "original" idea of the tarpon toad was to design a fly with the right dynamics and materials that would cause it to hover or suspend in the water column and track as straight as possible horizontally when retrieved instead of bobbing up and down, hence the flat head and plastic eyes instead of bead chain or bumbbell eyes. The purpose is to keep the fly in the tarpon's strike zone for as long as possible without it sinking since tarpon are known to habitually track a fly for a good distance before they strike. Having to sometimes lead them a great distance combined with the fact that they always look straight or up and never look down to feed, a sinking fly would most certainly defeat the purpose. A good illustration of the fly swimming under water can be seen in the attached video at the 1:57 minute compared to the action of a crab fly.  

 

Ted,I understand the concept of tarpon tracking the fly and why the fly is made like it is.My question was about the tiny little eyes and do they even matter? I tie my crab and shrimp w/o eyes as they are so small it would seem to be a superfluous detail.Not having fished for tarpon (yet) I can't confirm whether it matters to them or not but in all the other species I've fished for it doesn't seem to matter at all....esp when you consider there's a big ole hook sticking out the backside that they are disregarding.

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