JohnP

Thinking of bottom painting my boat am I crazy?

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39 posts in this topic

5 hours ago, JoeyZac said:

Before even going through the hassle of blocking it, I would give it a good power washing, and spend a few minutes working on the worst spots.  You'll either make rapid progress and decide the job is worth doing yourself, or it will be evident that it's a nightmare.

 

What's your time worth?  What's doing the job your way to your satisfaction worth by comparison?  What's your laziness level (mine is quite high, that's why I'm comfortable asking other).  :)

 

For a marina to block, wash, sand and paint that boat right, you're looking at at least a grand, probably more.

 

To block it yourself, wash it, sand it reasonably, tape it and paint it, probably what, a solid 8 hours, spread over two days?

I use my brother in laws power washer, it's so powerful the ablative comes off on the sides fairly easy

 

In Monmouth county NJ I pay 450 for my 22'er,  John's in Montauk which probably doubles that to the grand that you quoted

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3 mins ago, ferret said:

I use my brother in laws power washer, it's so powerful the ablative comes off on the sides fairly easy

 

In Monmouth county NJ I pay 450 for my 22'er,  John's in Montauk which probably doubles that to the grand that you quoted

 

That price sounds right to just slap on some cheap paint ($20/foot).

 

But to power wash it, sand it (that costs), and then use an expensive paint (easy $200 for one gallon, no?), they wouldn't charge you about $1,000 for that?

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Definitely my least favorite job when I worked at a marina, and it’s much, much more annoying if done on a trailer instead of a lift. 

 

My dad and I decide every other spring if it’s worth the effort of doing it ourselves or having a professional do it. Last few times, the professional won. The job itself isn’t difficult , just tedious.

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Bare spots need priming with a primer that etches the fiberglass or the bottom paint won’t stick. 2 years ago my boats bottom was perfectly clean but I had several spots including along the waterline where the paint was worn off. I painted with bottom paint only with 2 coats over the bare spots and the paint wore off quickly at the spots that were bare.  Last season I had the boat painted by my mechanic.  He primed the bare spots and applied the bottom paint.  I had no bare spots and only light moss over the entire bottom after a full season.  I guess I got a good deal since it was $200 for a 18’ center console, especially since a quart of primer alone was $60.  The bottom needed no other prep since I power wash immediately after pulling the boat before the moss dries in the fall.  Given my experience and looking at the condition of your bottom I would have it professionally prepped, primed and painted this year, clean it thoroughly after pulling in the fall, and if it doesn’t need much prep consider painting it yourself next spring.  For me, since my guy does a good job for $200, I’m having him do it every year.  

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13 hours ago, Cpalms said:

One more suggestion - when the bottom is painted - have them paint the rest of the bow section that was left unpainted.  This is purely aesthetics, but IMO it will look quite a bit nicer, black bottom will also camouflage the grungy water line a bit better.  Most Contenders are done this way, especially the ones that have their bottoms gelcoated a different color.

 

Yes that much is a given

 

this is stuff I never much paid attention to. Just part of the annual bill. 

 

But overall im sorta feeling I need to get more involved in the maintenance. It’s a learning process that I’m feeling I need to go through 

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It's certainly worth it to do it yourself unless you don't have the time. 

Now if you're going to strip, barrier coat & paint that's another story. That job sucks & it aint cheap; even if you do it yourself. I did a 25'er with 30 years of bottom paint on it. I did not have it blasted. Man that was miserable!

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I did mine on my trailer once.  Horrible work.  Got everything done except where the bunks are.  My plan was to launch and retrieve off center on the trailer to paint those spots.  4 years later and the bunk area is still unpainted.   Granted, I don't keep the boat in the water....I just painted for aesthetics to cover up existing bottom paint in bad shape.   Boat heads to its new owner on Sunday, so I supposed I'll never get it done.  

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After numerous stories of boats falling and crushing people, I would leave the trailer under the boat. Then jack up the boat and block it 4" higher then the  trailer and sand and paint, the trailer was mobile allowing access the entire bottom. The yards are get it done as the owner you'll do a better job. 

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If it stays in the water , paint it.  if always on a trailer , clean it and wax it. . no need for bottom paint. 

It needs a good cleaning right now and a coat of wax.  

I don't like those little mold spots above the water line. Clean them , could be trouble later. 

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funny story about how bad this job does suck....

 

Think I was 17 or 18.  I'm sitting on the ground with my legs on either side of the trailer tire reaching under the boat to get a hard to reach spot.  Quart of micron on the trailer fender.  ****ing dog comes my, hits the can with his tail or ass, quart of micron in my lap.

 

Dad was no where to be found, didn't know what to do....do I take mineral spirits to the nads?  Didn't matter, you know how thick that stuff is, by the time I got somewhere to shed clothes without leaving a paint trail to get killed over, damage was done and semi permanent.  Gave a whole new meaning to blue balls. 

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Whoa....That does not look good my friend.  Hard to tell what I'm looking at, but it seems like you have actual barnacles on your hull meaning there was no ablative, or it just sat in the water for a really long time.  How was that boat painted in the past? 

 

I have done various different processes over my relatively short 7 years of boat ownership and here's what I've learned:

 

1. Sanding really really sucks.  Worst boat job I've done.  Tedious, unhealthy, takes a toll on your body.  I am not opposed to hard manual labor but this is worth hiring out.  Painting is easy, prep is really tough. Espec on trailer.

 

2. A couple good coats of properly applied high quality ablative over a barrier coat should last multiple seasons.  As in, no need to re-paint every year, unless it's just a few spots to touch up.  We're talking like 3 seasons +.   Your barrier coat should be a different color so you know when it's time to re-apply and your ablative is wearing down to barrier.  Painting too often creates more problems, it becomes heavy makes the paint come off faster, in chunks.  It will also bring the barrier coat along with it when it starts coming off. Don't paint unless you're down to the barrier and you know you need it.  Less paint the better.  If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

 

3. It's been said before, but powerwashing the same day you're taking your boat out of the water really saves you a major headache.  That growth will harden like a rock over the winter, which you're seeing first hand.  It comes off really easily when the boat is still wet, and damn it is satisfying to watch that growth come off and see a clean bottom paint under it.

 

4. When the bottom gets really bad, and you're losing bottom paint and even barrier coat (like I did from over-painting, #2), and you're getting growth etc., it's time to start new, and the best way to do this is sandblast.  It cost me $700 for an 18 ft boat in CT, not cheap, you can probably find a better job.  But when it's done you have peace of mind and can start brand new and apply to manufacturers specs with barrier and ablative, and you're good for years.  

 

 

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I'm just a working stiff(who happens also to be a painter) so no way am I going to pay someone to paint the bottom of my boat. Yes, its dirty work but not that big if a job even on a trailer. For me I Jack up the bow first as much as I can. Get under there and prep(scrape,orbital and hand sand). Blow off dust with air hose. Wipe down quick with thinner on a rag. Tape water line and around engine mount. I use a mini microfiber roller to put on bottom paint. Next day lower bow and Jack stern up to do same process to stern area I couldn't reach(get about 90% of bottom by jacking bow up). I do it every year so I use west marine brand which is much cheaper than petit or interlux(about 70 or 80 bucks a gallon I think). Not sure if the expensive ones last multiple seasons if done with 2 coats but I just do 1 coat since I paint every year anyway.  Totally doable job for anybody if you don mind the dirty aspect. Where a mask and eye protection while sanding and scraping. And plan on wearing clothes you will throw out after or buy a tyvek suit 

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On 2/6/2019 at 3:51 PM, JohnP said:

Had the bottom painted 2 years ago. Now it looks like most of the paint is off and I’ve got scraping and sanding to do. Then I’d have to figure out if I’ve sanded enough to apply a coat of paint. Then repeat. 

 

Id have to buy protective gear. Etc 

 

but I think the boat yards charge a lot 

 

I’d really rather tackle it myself but thinking it over

 

what say you?

 

 

John thanks for the inspiration to start my sanding the bottom of my new boat, the boat was in Chatham waters all of last year so its pretty crappy, I went to a local guy who is at the top of his game when it comes to boat work, he took a look at my boat and said "nice work boat, just power wash was the boat to start, next sand the boat clean then again power wash it again, for a work boat go to the auto parts shop by two part epoxy paint for the bottom, for the inside, clean, sand and buy bilge paint for the inside, use a full face respirator for every thing you do"

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