salt deficient

Aluminum hulls in Bays

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Anybody regular the water with an aluminum hull?   Looking at boats lately.

 

Tempted to get A river fishing boat by bass pro, alot like a lund, but cheaper.  They got one for about 17k.   Anyone fish the lower niagara river might knw why I want one.

 

Thinking of a carolina skiff.  Maybe a J14, or their smallest deep V.   Coupled with a 25hp or so.  Trying to keep it around 6k or so.  

 

Option C is a used cabin cruiser or cuddy.   

 

Current boats is a regular height 14ft rowobat with 8hp evinrude.  I also got a new 10ft inflatable for traveling to hiltonhead or when we take the commuter car on a fishing trip.

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I've taken my 17 foot aluminum boat out 15+ miles and would absolutely do it again.  Are you looking at a reletavely small lake boat or something with some substance to it?

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I use my 15ft aluminum boat in the back bays of long island without any problems. I just wash it off like I would do with any boat. I’m looking into Carolina skiff j16s right now. I have a spare outboardnid like to have another skiff for the summer. 

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The 16ft boat has plenty of freeboard.

 

My rowboat is what you rent at a state park.  Need plenty of rum and cokes to get the beer muscles to take it through most inlets.....  not by me.

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I use my Lund 16 ssv near shore buzzards bay but pick light wind days and I'm usually not too far from the launch, great for getting into rocky spots

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Posted (edited) · Report post

45 mins ago, PM Casting said:

My current boat is a 14 ft DuraNautic tinny with a 15 hp 2 stroke. It’s great in the bays and estuaries and trailers easily. 

 

 

I had a Duranautic 14' "Coastal Model", boat that was build in the Hudson River Valley in 1970's'  12 years later my brother sold it to me for $300.00. (My picture holding the 41,75 inch Striped bass shows the boat behind me)  It was a great big water boat. The Coastal model was 6" deeper than the regular Duranautic. I put a 25 HP Honda 4 stroke on it and it flew.  The Duranautic boats weren't rivited. They were put together by welds,  

 

The USCG boat Safety testing Officer who's crew tried to sink or wreck  small boats said the Duranautic 14 Coastal couldn't be sunk of busted!

 

He was a brother-in law to one of my duck hunting buds.   I sold the boat, motor and trailer for $800.00 ten years later.  It is still being used on the Hudson River, 125 miles north of the Battery at the southern end of Manhattan. Stripers in the spring and ducks and geese from October to the middle of January.

 

Currently I own a 15 foot Blue Fin Dory modeled on the "One man Cod Boat that were dropped in the water of the mother ship at dawn and picked up a sundown on the Grand Banks fishing for Cod in the 1800's.  The deep hull  was designed to catch and float ;a Ton of Cod on a good day of fishing.

 

I have a 1977 15 HP Johnson 4 stroke that will attain its top speed of 28 MPH. in less than a minute. The high prow needs a driver standing and hanging on a bow line with their right hand and steering the outboard with the left hand.on the tiller of the outboard.The convex bottom and the two skeggs one the Port and Starboard sides of the Dory allow you to piviot quickly and on a calm River or Bay I can steer it with putting weight on the Port to move it smoothly to the left and the same to curve to the right side!  "Look Ma, No Hands!"

 

 

Edited by RJ

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I've owned aluminum boats since the 1970's.  Never had a single problem with using them in saltwater. Riveted hulls hold up as well as welded hulls, in my experience. Rivets can leak a bit but are easily repaired. Welds can also fail and require more work and skill to repair. I Used to have an 18' Lund Alaskan. Heavy boat. Would handle anything I threw at it. It was expensive to buy and needed a bigger motor than "rowboat" type skiffs because the boat was just so big and heavy. After I got rid of that boat, I never went that big in an aluminum boat again. I found that 14' in an aluminum hull is a perfect size. You can tow it with a compact car and a 15 hp motor will zip you around all day using very little gas. It can float in 6 inches of water. If I were looking fo a new aluminum hull,  today, I'd be going for one of the heavy duty welded jon boat styles that have a deeper V hull. Those boats tend to be heavier built and can shrug off abuse. I'd also look into getting it sprayed inside and out with some kind of truck bed liner. That'd go a long way to making it a maintenance free boat.  

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Had an 18' starcraft tin boat for 10 years.  Used it all over raritan bay, sandy hook, out front and trailered it to cape charles VA a bunch of times.  No issues.  Wash after use.  Enjoy

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I also have been using aluminum boats since the '70s, have had several Duranautics, great boats, last one was a '76 16' about 8 years ago. I really like aluminum for it's durability and low maintenance. Always wanted a welded plate aluminum west coast boat so a few years ago I bought a used Pacific 1925 from CA and had it shipped to me in MA, probably never sell it. 

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On 2/19/2019 at 8:31 AM, valentine said:

Riveted hulls hold up as well as welded hulls, in my experience. Rivets can leak a bit but are easily repaired. Welds can also fail and require more work and skill to repair.

I had a 17' Bass Tracker semi-V with a 50 HP Yamaha 2 stroke that went the length of the Chesapeake Bay and just about every lake, reservoir, and river within a few hours tow. Boat took hard knocks on the fast flowing rocky Susquehanna River just below the damn at the Pennsylvania line. Big problem trying to close a gash in the rivited cap over the keel. There is a rubber gasket between cap and keel.  When welding, the gasket would burn and the gas would blow out the weld before it would cool. Much fowl language employed that night. 

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