bobber

STAY TUNED!!! this is an important week

Rate this topic

61 posts in this topic

On 2/5/2019 at 0:18 AM, Shane_O said:

Personally, I think learning to use and emphasizing effective catch and release tactics is key when it comes to our impact. The majority of damage done by surf fisherman probably has more to do with the mishandling of fish than it does with the harvesting of keepers. We shouldn’t view the little guys as “rats”. I try to enforce and encourage good practices amongst other fisherman (when appropriate). Other than that, if there’s a way to get involved with local or state politics to help bolster the enforcement of laws against poaching and get more young people interested in becoming stewards of our local marine ecosystems, I’m all ears.

Image result for clapping gif

On 2/5/2019 at 9:32 AM, HugeDinghy said:

that was deep, numbnuts. 

 

Image result for bow gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/5/2019 at 0:18 AM, Shane_O said:

Personally, I think learning to use and emphasizing effective catch and release tactics is key when it comes to our impact. The majority of damage done by surf fisherman probably has more to do with the mishandling of fish than it does with the harvesting of keepers. 

Some need to be educated, some need to be fined and have there fishing privilege revoked with community service.

 

Some should be treated the same, as they treat the fish.

Lou T

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the striped bass fishery is a remnant of what it was 10-15 years ago.   fishing related business (LIKE THIS WEBSITE) and others will continue to dwindle down to nothingness if theres nothing left to fish for.....  its time to be aware of the crappy state of this fishery and what it takes to make effective changes for the better 

 

you can bury your head in the sand if ya like-   you're only hurting yourself

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, bobber said:

the striped bass fishery is a remnant of what it was 10-15 years ago.   fishing related business (LIKE THIS WEBSITE) and others will continue to dwindle down to nothingness if theres nothing left to fish for.....  its time to be aware of the crappy state of this fishery and what it takes to make effective changes for the better 

 

you can bury your head in the sand if ya like-   you're only hurting yourself

Yep.  Spot on.  Last year I only went a third of amount of the times I usually go l and I spent less than half of what I normally spend a year on fishing related equipment.  The only reason why I am still even bothering is because I am hoping if enough of us voice our concerns, the powers that be will actually address this problem and things will eventually improve.

 

I heard some snippets of what was discussed at yesterday's ASMFC meeting.  It sounded like they reinforced what most of us have been saying,  this fishery has been in trouble.  Its horrible on their part that they even allowed it to get to this point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

16 hours ago, bobber said:

the striped bass fishery is a remnant of what it was 10-15 years ago

More like 20-30 years ago

Edited by AlwaysWading

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was an interesting meeting.  It was pretty clear that everyone understood that there was a problem; it also seemed that most weren't quite certain what to do next, and were stalling for time in order to figure something out.  Some people who are usually very vocal at striped bass meetings said nothing at all.

 

At the same time, battle lines were being drawn.  It's clear that Maryland is going to lead the fight against any real effort to rebuild the stock, and will be trying to convince the Management Board to initiate a new amendment--a longer process than initiating an addendum--that will lower the spawning stock biomass target and threshold and increase the acceptable fishing mortality rate.  Delaware seems to be Maryland's most avid co-conspirator.  New England will lead the battle to rebuild the stock, with northern New England likely leading the fight.  A lot of the other states are probably still working out their positions, with the preliminary assessment review serving a sizable dose of reality to the usual pro-harvest voices, while the usual pro-conservation voices may be a little cowed by the size of the cutbacks needed to effectively end overfishing and rebuild the stock.

 

The meeting ended with a nearly-unanimous motion to task the Technical Committee to come up with one set of regulations that would provide a 50% chance of ending overfishing and present it at the May meeting; there was also near-unanimous agreement to have staff write a letter recommending against opening the EEZ around Block Island, which again will be reviewed in May.

 

It will be a hard, intense fight to get any meaningful management cuts for next year, but there are clearly people on the board who want that done--and people who don't.  But nearly all of the voices for higher landings were from Maryland and Delaware, which might be a good sign.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 mins ago, CWitek said:

It was an interesting meeting.  It was pretty clear that everyone understood that there was a problem; it also seemed that most weren't quite certain what to do next, and were stalling for time in order to figure something out.  Some people who are usually very vocal at striped bass meetings said nothing at all.

 

At the same time, battle lines were being drawn.  It's clear that Maryland is going to lead the fight against any real effort to rebuild the stock, and will be trying to convince the Management Board to initiate a new amendment--a longer process than initiating an addendum--that will lower the spawning stock biomass target and threshold and increase the acceptable fishing mortality rate.  Delaware seems to be Maryland's most avid co-conspirator.  New England will lead the battle to rebuild the stock, with northern New England likely leading the fight.  A lot of the other states are probably still working out their positions, with the preliminary assessment review serving a sizable dose of reality to the usual pro-harvest voices, while the usual pro-conservation voices may be a little cowed by the size of the cutbacks needed to effectively end overfishing and rebuild the stock.

 

The meeting ended with a nearly-unanimous motion to task the Technical Committee to come up with one set of regulations that would provide a 50% chance of ending overfishing and present it at the May meeting; there was also near-unanimous agreement to have staff write a letter recommending against opening the EEZ around Block Island, which again will be reviewed in May.

 

It will be a hard, intense fight to get any meaningful management cuts for next year, but there are clearly people on the board who want that done--and people who don't.  But nearly all of the voices for higher landings were from Maryland and Delaware, which might be a good sign.

Thanks for the info.  Is it just me or this doesn't sound too promising?

 

Why do they insist on kill, kill, kill?  From what I understand tarpon are C&R and they generate plenty of business for all.  Why couldn't the for hires who keep pushing to keep as many fish as they can, promote C&R more?  A few years ago I took a fishing trip down to FL and we didn't keep one fish.  Don't they realize the more fish there is, the better off everyone will be?  People take an interest in fishing when there are actually fish to catch.  My nephew is a perfect example.  I started bringing him with me a few years ago when there was still some decent action to be had.  As he got older he got more into it, he started going on his own once he got his drivers license.  Last year, he went over 40 times between September and October and hardly caught anything.  He more or less stopped going after that and is losing interest.

 

If people want fresh fish, why couldn't the party boat, keep a few, and give out fillets for all their customers?  As a customer, I would be fine with something like that.  This way they get the experience and the fresh fish while limiting the amount of fish that are being harvested. Nowadays with cell phones, we don't need to kill a fish to show friends and family.  We can easily take a picture of it or even a video and post for all to see if your goal is to share with everyone.  The old business model of kill as many fish as you can is an antiquated mindset that is not sustainable.  There is simply too many of us and not enough of them.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 min ago, jps1010 said:

Thanks for the info.  Is it just me or this doesn't sound too promising?

 

Why do they insist on kill, kill, kill?  From what I understand tarpon are C&R and they generate plenty of business for all.  Why couldn't the for hires who keep pushing to keep as many fish as they can, promote C&R more?  A few years ago I took a fishing trip down to FL and we didn't keep one fish.  Don't they realize the more fish there is, the better off everyone will be?  People take an interest in fishing when there are actually fish to catch.  My nephew is a perfect example.  I started bringing him with me a few years ago when there was still some decent action to be had.  As he got older he got more into it, he started going on his own once he got his drivers license.  Last year, he went over 40 times between September and October and hardly caught anything.  He more or less stopped going after that and is losing interest.

 

If people want fresh fish, why couldn't the party boat, keep a few, and give out fillets for all their customers?  As a customer, I would be fine with something like that.  This way they get the experience and the fresh fish while limiting the amount of fish that are being harvested. Nowadays with cell phones, we don't need to kill a fish to show friends and family.  We can easily take a picture of it or even a video and post for all to see if your goal is to share with everyone.  The old business model of kill as many fish as you can is an antiquated mindset that is not sustainable.  There is simply too many of us and not enough of them.

 

Believe it or not, I thought that the meeting was a little more positive than I had expected.  Some voices that are usually always looking for excuses to increase the kill were completely silent.  They may not stay that way, but right now, I think that they're a little surprised by the outcome of the stock assessment, and are still testing the political waters, trying to decide which way to go; it's possible that some of them might even be startled enough to be thinking about doing right by the bass.

 

It's clear that Maryland will be the loudest anti-conservation voice.  Maryland led the fight against the Addendum IV reductions, have been trying to undercut Addendum IV ever since, never reduced its recreational landings as required (and actually increased them), and is now taking about initiating a new, riskier amendment to the management plan.  That's probably coming straight from the governor, who is close to the watermen and promised to take care of them when he was first elected.  He sees them as an important part of his base.

 

But in my view, the outcome is very much in play, and could well depend on who is most effective in mobilizing the public, turning them out to hearings, and having their voices heard.  I think that many state managers, particularly in the Northeast, are aware of just what you said--that an abundance of bass is good for their angling-related businesses and coastal economy--and are still trying to find, in their own minds, the equilibrium point between harvest and abundance.  That's where all of us come in, letting them know that abundance drives effort for a very large portion of the striped bass angling community.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

One of the key points from the meeting was that 48% of the kill was from recreational release. What the board talked about was that any change that occurs needs to take this into account. Increasing the size limit as an example may actually increase the release kill. So the coming changes are not going to be an easy fix. 

 

One other her point that was clear is the board members are very aware that the public are going to be very unhappy with the failure of the board to prevent stripper from ending up overfished and will be expecting quick action. So need to keep the pressure on them. 

Edited by MichaelT
Added info

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, CWitek said:

It was an interesting meeting.  It was pretty clear that everyone understood that there was a problem; it also seemed that most weren't quite certain what to do next, and were stalling for time in order to figure something out.  Some people who are usually very vocal at striped bass meetings said nothing at all.

 

At the same time, battle lines were being drawn.  It's clear that Maryland is going to lead the fight against any real effort to rebuild the stock, and will be trying to convince the Management Board to initiate a new amendment--a longer process than initiating an addendum--that will lower the spawning stock biomass target and threshold and increase the acceptable fishing mortality rate.  Delaware seems to be Maryland's most avid co-conspirator.  New England will lead the battle to rebuild the stock, with northern New England likely leading the fight.  A lot of the other states are probably still working out their positions, with the preliminary assessment review serving a sizable dose of reality to the usual pro-harvest voices, while the usual pro-conservation voices may be a little cowed by the size of the cutbacks needed to effectively end overfishing and rebuild the stock.

 

The meeting ended with a nearly-unanimous motion to task the Technical Committee to come up with one set of regulations that would provide a 50% chance of ending overfishing and present it at the May meeting; there was also near-unanimous agreement to have staff write a letter recommending against opening the EEZ around Block Island, which again will be reviewed in May.

 

It will be a hard, intense fight to get any meaningful management cuts for next year, but there are clearly people on the board who want that done--and people who don't.  But nearly all of the voices for higher landings were from Maryland and Delaware, which might be a good sign.

Charles - thank you again for taking the time to participate and explain/report back. 

 

On some levels I am hopeful that meaningful change will happen but realistically I’m not counting on it. The shortsightedness in regards to fisheries has not changed significantly. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 mins ago, Drew C. said:

Charles - thank you again for taking the time to participate and explain/report back. 

 

On some levels I am hopeful that meaningful change will happen but realistically I’m not counting on it. The shortsightedness in regards to fisheries has not changed significantly. 

 

 

Putting together a more detailed blog on this now, but the key thing that struck me was that most people there seemed to be uncertain about exactly what to do next; my gut feel is that they were surprised by the assessment results, and are not looking forward to taking needed actions just because of what they will involve.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 mins ago, CWitek said:

Putting together a more detailed blog on this now, but the key thing that struck me was that most people there seemed to be uncertain about exactly what to do next; my gut feel is that they were surprised by the assessment results, and are not looking forward to taking needed actions just because of what they will involve.

That was my impression. I think once they know what is recommended there will be some issues. 

 

Judging by the cuts from 2014 (they didn’t help) i assume we are looking at 32” or higher with some sort of in season closure too, and significant closures at that. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A 50% chance of ending over fishing ? I think we all figured out how effective the 28% was and how much progress was made with "Conservation Equivalency" measures. 50 % gets us nowhere. If you were standing in a firing line , a half dozen unfortunates and the shooters were instructed to decide which three to execute, would you like your chances ? There is no future in playing percentages right now. The bass have too much working against them in addition to over fishing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Drew C. said:

That was my impression. I think once they know what is recommended there will be some issues. 

 

Judging by the cuts from 2014 (they didn’t help) i assume we are looking at 32” or higher with some sort of in season closure too, and significant closures at that. 

 

 

I think that the big issue is going to be the Chesapeake. 

 

I could be wrong, but I'm thinking that's where a lot of the recreational discard mortality was taking place (there was a big piece on the coast, too, I'm sure, but not on the scale of all of the young fish being killed in the Bay).  And Maryland, in particular, will be very resistant to making any further cuts to its landings.

 

Remember that the Addendum IV cuts did what they were intended to do on the coast.  We still overfished, because no one realized how many fish anglers were really landing, but as far as anyone knew, coastal landings in 2015 and beyond were were cut by 25%--and more.  But landings were not cut at all in the Bay, and in fact increased substantially.  And there is also a lot of summer discard mortality there due to warm water, low oxygen and high air temperatures.  

 

I suspect that, among other things, this may turn out to be a coast vs. Bay fight, with Maryland fighting hard to keep the kill high and much of the coast supporting conservation, but wanting the Bay to do its share this time around.  There will also be the usual harvest vs conservation debate.

 

My gut tells me that on the coast, 32" will probably get the job done, without the need for a season.  I could be wrong, but that would amount to a big cut in landings.  The Bay will be trickier; they're 2 @ 20" there (19" with circle hooks in Maryland), so going to one fish is the first step, and then either size, season or both.

 

The other thing that we have to remember is that in 2017, anglers were responsible for 90% of all fishing mortality (42% in recreational landings, 48% in recreational discards), so folks pushing "gamefish" aren't going to have a leg to stand on.  We are going to be the focus of the change, and discards are going to be under the microscope.  So we need to start thinking along those lines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.