NaturalScience

2019 Fruit and Vegetable Gardening Thread

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12 mins ago, NaturalScience said:

Thanks for the input.

I'm going to engage in a control regimen this year. Possibly a combination of "chemical" and bacterial. Have more research to do on the subject but in trying to keep organic my options may be limited.

I think it may have been Mattituck Mike that suggested last year prevention is the key.

Clean up, rotate, prune lower leaves, prune any sign of disease.   Try mulching with a few inches of clean straw.  Don’t crowd plants and don’t work around them when they’re wet/damp.  Hope for decent weather.   Lot of diseases are soil borne but some come in on a breeze.   

If you have enough garden space to not use some for a season you could try solarization.  One or two layers of clear plastic down tight on well watered soil for a couple months during warmest part of summer.  Needs to heat over 100 down several inches for a long enough period to be effective.   Never done it. 

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2 mins ago, JimW said:

Clean up, rotate, prune lower leaves, prune any sign of disease.   Try mulching with a few inches of clean straw.  Don’t crowd plants and don’t work around them when they’re wet/damp.  Hope for decent weather.   Lot of diseases are soil borne but some come in on a breeze.   

If you have enough garden space to not use some for a season you could try solarization.  One or two layers of clear plastic down tight on well watered soil for a couple months during warmest part of summer.  Needs to heat over 100 down several inches for a long enough period to be effective.   Never done it. 

Thanks Jim.

I was just reading up on it and many of those were mentioned. 

The cooking method was kinda what I was hoping might happen with the black plastic.

I'm adding some beds this year so maybe I can leave some of the old ones to "rest".

Also was planning on adopting a bit of a mash up of sq ft and traditional techniques.

I definitely had some crowding issues using the recommended spacing of sq ft.

I think I need to take more care about my composting too. I probably have put diseased stuff in it.

Disinfecting tools too. 

Hopefully with some diligence I can at least keep it manageable. 

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19 mins ago, fishfood said:

Any of you folks have backyard chickens?  I'm getting mixed opinions researching chickens and gardens online.  Seems like some think they're great (eat bugs and what not) and others say they'll destroy your garden.  In spite of my better judgement I'm building a coop and we're getting a few (4-6?) layers this spring, with plans of free ranging during the day and secure in a coop at night.   But if they're going to destroy my garden, I'll just give them a bigger run and keep them there.   

 

Some friends keep a few.  It’s risky.  Chickens love lettuce and young shoots of many things and peck at tomatoes and squash.  Some things they won’t bother.    They keep the chickens in a yard with a wire top over it just to keep the chickens though.  Hawks kept snatching.  

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20 mins ago, JimW said:

prune lower leaves, prune any sign of disease.   .......and don’t work around them when they’re wet/damp.  Hope for decent weather.

 

:laugh: ..... Sorry Jim, I totally agree with everything you said cause it is spot on, but had to laugh at the combination of those two, cause around my parts, unless you are retired and have nothing else to do, trying to do those two things together is next to impossible, at least often enough to make any real difference. :o

 

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3 mins ago, NaturalScience said:

Thanks Jim.

I was just reading up on it and many of those were mentioned. 

The cooking method was kinda what I was hoping might happen with the black plastic.

I'm adding some beds this year so maybe I can leave some of the old ones to "rest".

Also was planning on adopting a bit of a mash up of sq ft and traditional techniques.

I definitely had some crowding issues using the recommended spacing of sq ft.

I think I need to take more care about my composting too. I probably have put diseased stuff in it.

Disinfecting tools too. 

Hopefully with some diligence I can at least keep it manageable. 

I think I renew the spores from compost too.   Was thinking I might try to cook the compost with solarization before it goes to the garden.  Otherwise mostly trying to clean it up.  I don’t think the compost pile ever heats up enough on its own.  

 

If you start off spraying Neem oil immediately it could be helpful but once you have signs of disease it’s pretty worthless.  Copper based solutions might be my next choice and the real fungicides last (or not at all)

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1 min ago, Steve in Mass said:

 

:laugh: ..... Sorry Jim, I totally agree with everything you said cause it is spot on, but had to laugh at the combination of those two, cause around my parts, unless you are retired and have nothing else to do, trying to do those two things together is next to impossible, at least often enough to make any real difference. :o

 

I use to do it all the time.  Now retired I’m gonna try to take my advice.  Last year was ridiculous though, choices were wet or in pouring rain.  

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Yeah, the summers the past few years have been trying.....last year started great, but then just about the time any major issues would start to manifest, it gets too damn damp almost all the time to work around the plants. This past year was the epitome of that...........

 

:o

 

 

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18 mins ago, JimW said:

I think I renew the spores from compost too.   Was thinking I might try to cook the compost with solarization before it goes to the garden.  Otherwise mostly trying to clean it up.  I don’t think the compost pile ever heats up enough on its own.  

 

If you start off spraying Neem oil immediately it could be helpful but once you have signs of disease it’s pretty worthless.  Copper based solutions might be my next choice and the real fungicides last (or not at all)

I have the same thoughts about my pile. I have it in a back corner and while it gets some sun it's not a lot. 

I really don't want to move it to more valuable real estate in the yard but I'm considering it.

I had the copper spray last year but I was well infested by the time I started using it, so it was pretty useless.

I came across an article about colloidal silver being effective.

The potting mix I'm using for seedlings lists biofungicide mycchorhizae. Not sure if adding mycchorhizae to the outdoor soil would work but I don't have any of the fungus issues on the seedling pots that I did with other seed starting mix. 

 

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4 mins ago, NaturalScience said:

I came across an article about colloidal silver being effective.

Funny, I just heard something on some radio show about colloidal silver and mold/mildew/fungus within the past week. Can't place the application or details right now, but I know for whatever it was used for you had to be careful that is true colloidal silver and not some other silver compound as it will not be effective and can even be damaging.

 

Perhaps the rest of it will come to me shortly.............

Edited by Steve in Mass

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My neighbor got 4 last year. He doesn't have much of a garden but there are some flower beds.

I had heard you need to be prepared that they scratch and will tear the crap out of the yard. 

From what I have seen his beds and lawn remains intact. 

Good luck with them. They seem to be rather personable.

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3 mins ago, Steve in Mass said:

Funny, I just heard something on some radio show about colloidal silver and mold/mildew/fungus within the past week. Can't place the application or details right now, but I know for whatever it was used for you had to be careful that is true colloidal silver and not some other silver compound as it will not be effective and can even be damaging.

 

Perhaps the rest of it will come to me shortly.............

What read too mentioned it had to be true colloidal not ionic silver.

I'll see if I can dig up the link.

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1 hour ago, NaturalScience said:

My neighbor got 4 last year. He doesn't have much of a garden but there are some flower beds.

I had heard you need to be prepared that they scratch and will tear the crap out of the yard. 

From what I have seen his beds and lawn remains intact. 

Good luck with them. They seem to be rather personable.

Sweet.  They can tear up all the grass for all I care.  Then I can go fishing instead of mowing.  

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Disease resistance

Mycorrhizae also help the plant resist infection by other fungi and even bacteria. This may be because the plant, being better nourished, is healthier and has better resistance to the invader. It may also be that the large physical presence of one fungus impedes infection by others. Another possibility is that either the plant or the fungus produces compounds that prevent infection by pathogens.

 

Off the university of Nevada page

 

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I've had my only two fruit trees (Blood orange and tangelo) die on me the last couple of years (And my neighbor's orange tree)... I think something is being passed around... Don't know what to do about it, but I would like to replace the trees, but don't want them to have the same fate... Where do I start?...

 

Butch   

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