NaturalScience

2019 Fruit and Vegetable Gardening Thread

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Steve had just mentioned crushing some Tums and adding to the soil for this.

Apparently it is easily and rapid absorbed by the plant.

I started using gypsum last year to supplement calcium. Its been brought to my attention that it is slowly released into the soil.

 

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Good morning. 

I have a question regarding pickling cucumber for those knowledgeable. 

I was wondering the efficacy and safety of making a large bucket of brine and adding some of the seasons harvest as it is made available by the plants? Cucumbers deteriorate quite rapidly and it can be a bit tricky to gather enough properly sized fresh fruit for a worthwhile processing. I did a bit of interwebs searching but couldn't really find an answer to the question specifically. 

Reading between the lines leads me to believe that this idea may not be a good one but I figured I'd ask where someone would be able to answer directly.  Plus I trust your information. 

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3 hours ago, NaturalScience said:

Steve had just mentioned crushing some Tums and adding to the soil for this.

Apparently it is easily and rapid absorbed by the plant.

I started using gypsum last year to supplement calcium. Its been brought to my attention that it is slowly released into the soil.

 

I have used rot-stop which may have worked.  Hard to know as ber usually goes away on its own once growth evens out and they get more even watering.  Gypsum is good in fall or early because it doesn’t affect Ph, or so I’ve read.  

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5 hours ago, JimW said:

I have used rot-stop which may have worked.  Hard to know as ber usually goes away on its own once growth evens out and they get more even watering.  Gypsum is good in fall or early because it doesn’t affect Ph, or so I’ve read.  

I started with the gypsum last year, probably when my cucumber and tomatoes were end rotting. This year I worked it in with the pre planting fertilization early spring late winter. Not that i can say it's the "cure" but I haven't had issues with end rot this year.

I wouldn't be surprised if that really wet spring last year was a big part.

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10 hours ago, NaturalScience said:

Steve had just mentioned crushing some Tums and adding to the soil for this.

Apparently it is easily and rapid absorbed by the plant.

I started using gypsum last year to supplement calcium. Its been brought to my attention that it is slowly released into the soil.

 

I'm adding one Tums to my EarhBox tomatoes not only because of the forum recommendation but because of the EarthBox forum recommendation. Hope my tomatoes don't mind flavored Tums which is what I'm adding, every two weeks. TOO hot to spray my Orchard spray for the tomatoes but hoping, because they're looking so good, they won't mind the delay in this organic spraying. No bottom rot, Tum's? as recommended. Will spray once the temperatures DON'T reach the 90's during the day. So far, so good.

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The calcium won't help the fruit that already has the end rot but will help to prevent other fruit on that plant from getting it. Uneven watering is also a cause, but with rain, that is hard to control.  Also, you have to watch the magnesium content of any fertilizer you use, since while vegetables do need Mg, too much prevents the uptake of the calcium.

 

As to the brine and the cucumbers, you are more or less making barrel pickles. They can be kept at room temp with a little care, or left in jars in the fridge with almost no carefor extended periods of time.

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Does anyone have any idea what is going on with my cucumbers.  I’m getting quite a few doing this and only a couple of normal ones, and they are coming from the same plants. 

CEAEED36-C28D-45E0-89E3-55DC5D22D42E.jpeg

C7D3F6EF-7A29-415A-ACDD-F57B75603392.jpeg

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Are those supposed to be a slicer type? i.e. long and slender verses something like a lemon cuc.

 

If so, from what I understand some of it comes from incomplete pollination, but usually when I see that, the bottom gets bulbous like that and yellow, and the top near the stem is thin and kinda shriveled and dark green.

 

I think there is something else going on there..........

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29 mins ago, Steve in Mass said:

Are those supposed to be a slicer type? i.e. long and slender verses something like a lemon cuc.

 

 

Yea it’s supposed to be a normal slicing type. I was googling it and it says can be too much watering or not enough watering or too much fertilizer or not enough fertilizer.   Really, it was no help so I figured I would come here for first hand info.  The cucumber in this pic is from the same plant. 

97AD9F6E-B1B5-4184-B8E8-4DA816893FCE.jpeg

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If you are getting those from the same plant. I am pretty sure the bad ones are a incomplete pollination issue. As the bee population continues to decline, this is becoming an increasingly serious issue. I have observed it getting worse or a good 8 -10 years now.

 

Only solution I have for that is to plant more bee attracting plants.

Edited by Steve in Mass

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9 hours ago, Steve in Mass said:

The calcium won't help the fruit that already has the end rot but will help to prevent other fruit on that plant from getting it. Uneven watering is also a cause, but with rain, that is hard to control.  Also, you have to watch the magnesium content of any fertilizer you use, since while vegetables do need Mg, too much prevents the uptake of the calcium.

 

As to the brine and the cucumbers, you are more or less making barrel pickles. They can be kept at room temp with a little care, or left in jars in the fridge with almost no carefor extended periods of time.

Don't have any blossom end rot so, since I can't spray my organic tomato spray with this heat spell, I've added the crushed Tums for extra calcium. My tomatoes look perfect as they're forming and hanging on the plant.

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JAO: Last season, especially towards the end of the season, I had several of these lemon shaped cukes growing in my cuke Earthbox which, as you know, is a self watering, covered box watered through a tube in the top of the box so no excess watering, weeds, etc. Bees were active throughout the season but some of my cukes looked like lemons, not many, but some. Maybe incomplete pollination, etc. but, since I make pickles from my cukes, I just sliced them up in the brine and went from there. This year, I changed my cuke plants to the Kirby pickle variety and, so far, all have been gorgeous 4" blocky cukes, making for perfect pickles. I switched from Burpee "Picklebush", in case you're wondering. Just use those "lemon" shaped cukes. Taste the same. Just don't look as perfect! Really like the Kirby variety and hope I'll be able to find it next year. 

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1 hour ago, JAO said:

Any recommendations?

Flowers, plant with multiple small flowers.  Basil plant should bolt to flower quite easily in this heat. I let my thai basil bolt and bee just went crazy over them.

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