MassMino

GW's from 2018

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45 mins ago, Aaron Barmmer said:

Here is another one.  My brother took this pic today    Truro 

B01088F8-5FFD-4548-A136-B27E63F37F52.jpeg

Would have been a great addition to the stomach contents thread had you opened her up!

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On 2/8/2019 at 3:56 PM, Aaron Barmmer said:

Here is another one.  My brother took this pic today    Truro 

B01088F8-5FFD-4548-A136-B27E63F37F52.jpeg

@Reed422

 

e6cd490b-b877-4748-aa35-072b12563ed7-baby_shark_toy.jpg.744762b751c81aaae5fa6c4e5f2ca82a.jpg

♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡

♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡

 

 

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Wait....... what?

_____

 

Test bite, Reed!

Re: seal

(Yeah, the one whose ribs are cleaved clean thru)

 

You see Reed, ... without hands, silly lil' sharks must use their teeth to "investigate" dinner...

Edited by rst3

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If we assume, reasonably enough, that water temperatures around Massachusetts are as cold as they're going to get, then ... safe to say that GWs are now year-round residents.  The clincher would be recovering a tooth from one of these mangled seals. 

 

I'll speculate further that it's the biggest sharks, rather then the smallest, that are hanging around. That last carcass seems to have been sheered in half. There is nothing in the frame that gives a reliable sense of scale, but the bite radius of the shark in question has to be pretty big to cut even a young of the year seal in half. Small sharks eat fish; big sharks eat mammals. And size would be a help in heat retention.

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51 mins ago, BrianBM said:

If we assume, reasonably enough, that water temperatures around Massachusetts are as cold as they're going to get, then ... safe to say that GWs are now year-round residents.  The clincher would be recovering a tooth from one of these mangled seals. 

 

I'll speculate further that it's the biggest sharks, rather then the smallest, that are hanging around. That last carcass seems to have been sheered in half. There is nothing in the frame that gives a reliable sense of scale, but the bite radius of the shark in question has to be pretty big to cut even a young of the year seal in half. Small sharks eat fish; big sharks eat mammals. And size would be a help in heat retention.

This was actually a very small shark.  That board in the picture is a skimboard.  Much smaller then a short surfboard...   definitely a juvenile GW. Probably in the 10 foot range. Very small seal too.  Just a baby.... 

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57 mins ago, BrianBM said:

If we assume, reasonably enough, that water temperatures around Massachusetts are as cold as they're going to get, then ... safe to say that GWs are now year-round residents.  The clincher would be recovering a tooth from one of these mangled seals. 

 

I'll speculate further that it's the biggest sharks, rather then the smallest, that are hanging around. That last carcass seems to have been sheered in half. There is nothing in the frame that gives a reliable sense of scale, but the bite radius of the shark in question has to be pretty big to cut even a young of the year seal in half. Small sharks eat fish; big sharks eat mammals. And size would be a help in heat retention.

Imho, Judging from the board for scale, I'd say the bite radius from the offender to that seal.. is not near the top of the scale for GWS. Like 12ish.  It's a big shark.. but not outrageously big.

bite_radius_crap_shot_glass.jpg.90552b5750da14d091bfc3d2b0d344e4.jpg

 

Again, this is my opinion. And I dont want to get beaten up over it. (Jaws reference)

 

Bite radius crap, "Jaws!":

 

Actually useful!

because it shows the bite on a large tiger shark. Similar, imo, to what bit the seal. But nowhere near as big as the 18ft bruisers that GWs can achieve 

 

Edited by rst3

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12 mins ago, Aaron Barmmer said:

This was actually a very small shark.  That board in the picture is a skimboard.  Much smaller then a short surfboard...   definitely a juvenile GW. Probably in the 10 foot range. Very small seal too.  Just a baby.... 

You're probably right.

I said 12 in my post, and looking back at the picture again, 12 seems overdone. Ten-ish, maybe 11.. has my vote

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35 mins ago, Reed422 said:

I saw a headless seal on the beach in cotuit. But GW aren't on the southside so keep wading 1/2 mile out :)

 

I found a headless seal on a beach in RI... nearly fell over it in the foggy darkness....  I'm probably lucky i didn't get bowled over by it in the surf as I was fishing that spot earlier in the evening

 

....same beach on which a dead GW washed up.

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30 mins ago, Kones1 said:

I wonder how many people get bitten this year. We should start a pool. An over/under kinda thing. 

Count me in.

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I remember reading an article a while ago that talked about the feeding habits of great whites. It stated that the GWs that frequent CC have developed a style of feeding unique to the area. They move in on the seals, swimming back and forth they force the seal into the shallows limiting the seals options for escape when the seal is in transition from swimming to climbing up to the beach  the shark has the upper hand. So this habit tells us they feed where we wad to fish or the area most people swimming spend their time. Not to many years ago I paddled and lead kayak tours on the Cape, I surfed my kayak at Nauset breach,and paddled in the race at Race Point and paddled out Monomoy to see the seals. All this and never saw a GW. I haven't paddle the Cape in years and don't think I ever will again. I respect the superiority of these animals in their natural habitat. I just hope they eat every seal on the Cape.

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When I think of how we waded the beaches in the dark years ago it sends chills up my spine. Of course there were few if any GWs back then.  But I'll never wade a beach at night beyond my ankles ever again.

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9 mins ago, bob_G said:

When I think of how we waded the beaches in the dark years ago it sends chills up my spine. Of course there were few if any GWs back then.  But I'll never wade a beach at night beyond my ankles ever again.

How bout Tony Stetzko?? Who used to deep-wade GW central? Wonder, if he was still around.. if he'd have changed his bar-and-trough wading practices by now

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