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mightyrime

Palegic setup.. 12wt?

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I am going to Costa Rica in December.  I plan on mostly fishing inshore, but will do 1 or 2 days chasing Sailfish i assume if they are around ( which they should be).    If I go with an outfitter without fly tackle i need my own rig.  

 

I currently own a sage salt 12wt with a tibor gulfstream that has 275yd of dacron.  Is this enough rod?  I would love to not buy something new for a specie i might chase twice in a decade.

 

thanks

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I’m headed down there in a couple weeks. I did use it as an excuse to buy more gear. Ended up talking to Bob from Colton. Got his 11wt levithian xs. I’ll report back after the trip and let you know how it worked out. 

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30 mins ago, PhillyPhisher said:

I’m headed down there in a couple weeks. I did use it as an excuse to buy more gear. Ended up talking to Bob from Colton. Got his 11wt levithian xs. I’ll report back after the trip and let you know how it worked out. 

what area you going to?  where are you staying?  I am still in research mode.

 

do you surf?

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1 hour ago, mightyrime said:

what area you going to?  where are you staying?  I am still in research mode.

 

do you surf?

Haven’t surfed in years. 

 

Going to zancudo lodge. Kind of a wedding present/ bachelor party/ was a good reason to go with my dad. 

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12 is probably ok, i don't think Sailfish sound or go deep do they? so it's likely a line capacity issue more than anything

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1 min ago, Sandflee said:

12 is probably ok, i don't think Sailfish sound or go deep do they? so it's likely a line capacity issue more than anything

pacific sails are basically wet noodles that don't pull very hard.  One run, a couple of jumps and they swim to the boat for hook removal.  12wt is fine.  It's when a blue shows up in the spread - that's when you want all the firepower you can get.

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1 hour ago, Cpalms said:

pacific sails are basically wet noodles that don't pull very hard.  One run, a couple of jumps and they swim to the boat for hook removal.  12wt is fine.  It's when a blue shows up in the spread - that's when you want all the firepower you can get.

what is a blue??  blue marlin?

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Interesting, I live in NJ and want to start chasing bfts on the fly, I had a 12 wt setup ready to go, all my buddy's told me to upgrade to 14 wt and get newer 50-60# powercore fly lines

 

also, with spinning poppers and jigs, most setups use extended mono that doubles as a shock leaders, anybody do that in between the the fly line and backing?  Is a longer leader enough, but that must cast horrible?

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The only sail I caught was on a 12 wt. But here's the clincher. I also hooked a big black on that outfit and would have had zero chance. I mean zero. It turned out not to matter since it ran straight away and its dorsal cut the leader.

 

A 12 is plenty fine for pacific sails. Like already said the issue is if a striped or blue show up. Conversely a 14 is also fine for sails and not too much. Sailfish tend to jump and jump and don't frequently sound (although they sometimes do). But marlin are much more likely to sound. If you hook any kind of a billfish and it sounds you will be sorry to only have a 12 in your hands. Just hope if that happens that the captain is able to plane the fish back up with the boat.

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Sails are in close now as are dorado. I am going out tomorow with a friend of mine and in a panga for sails and dorado.. 12 wt is adequit for sails. Marlin, you might be pushing the envelope. My other friend went out yesterday and they went 2 for 5 on sails and landed 6 dorado. I used to know a great Captain out of Zancudo. He used to guide for Roy's Zancudo lodge.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

heres a good read from a couple of years ago

 

 

(*from Saltwater Sportsman)



A hooked sailfish’s first response is to either take off or shake its head violently to rid itself of the hook. If it does the latter, just stay tight on the fish until it runs. Once it takes off, concentrate on clearing the fly line. Form a tight circle around it with the thumb and index finger in your free hand to create some tension, and stretch your arm down and away from the reel to give yourself a cushion in case you’re forced to undo a tangle before it reaches the first rod guide.

If a knot or tangle forms and you can’t shake it loose, point the rod at the fish and twist it so the reel points up. Then the line will slide along the rod blank and be less likely to catch on every snake guide. If luck is on your side and the knot or tangle makes if through all the guides, ease up on the drag and try to clear the mess before resuming the fight.

Although a few fly anglers opt for 13- to 15-weight rods built specifically for billfish, fly rod manufacturers design their 12-weights for tarpon and other large, powerful fish, so that’s not really necessary. As a rule of thumb, in fact, most sailfish anglers use a 12-weight rod with a quality, large arbor reel that holds 350 yards or more of 50-pound backing, matched with a 13-weight fly line.

The top brands offer specialty fly lines for billfish. Scientific Anglers makes its Mastery Series Billfish Taper line, an orange, 80-foot line with a heavy sinking head and floating running line that is available in 13- and 15-weight. Cortland makes its Tropic Plus Billfish Taper Subsurface line, a chartreuse, 65-foot fly line with a 9-foot, clear intermediate-sink tip, available in 13-, 14-, and 15-weight. Meanwhile, Rio offers, as part of its Tropical Series Levianthan lines, a dark gray (with the rear 4-foot section in orange), 550-grain (fast sinking), 30-foot Billfish Shooting Head, which completely forgoes the running line to minimize line drag when a billfish sounds.

A pair of 5/O to 7/O hooks rigged in tandem with the points facing in opposite directions is the accepted standard for billfish patterns, and tube flies, which allow the leader to slide through freely, improve your chances for a solid hook-set considerably. Cam Sigler, the leading maker of big game flies, offers them in a couple of sizes and several different colors. For some reason, bright pink and white has been anointed the top color scheme for sailfish flies. It’s not exactly clear whether that’s due to the fish’s predilection, or because the contrasting, hi-vis combination is easy for the angler and crew to keep track of in the water.

It’s been my experience that Pacific sails do like pink and white, so why not take advantage of the visibilty benefit? For Atlantic sails, I’ve personally had better luck with blue and white, however, I have caught a couple on pink and white also, so I carry flies in both color schemes whenever I target sails, no matter in which ocean. But as a norm, my flies for Atlantics average 8 inches in length, and the ones I use for Pacifics are two inches longer and a bit bushier too.

Perhaps the most important accessory is a popper head just ahead of the fly to produce the noise and splash that lets sailfish zero in. Turbo Popping Heads by Rainy’s Premium Flies are great, and Cam Siegler offers a slimmer version called Bubble Heads that are a bit less wind resistent and still create the desired ruckus.

There are different opinions about the length and makeup of fly leaders for billfish, but my preferred setup is 8 feet long and pretty simple to put together. I start with 6 feet of 60-pound mono, which once I attach one end to the fly line with an Albright knot, and tie a Surgeon’s Loop on the other, forms a strong 5-foot butt section that turns over the leader and fly pretty well. Next, I grab a 5-foot length of 20-pound hard mono and tie Bimini twists on both ends, leaving 18 to 20 inches of single strand to serve as the class tippet. Then, I tie a Surgeon’s Loop with the double line of one of the Biminis, so I actually end up with a double-strand loop for a stronger connection to the butt.

Finally, because I use tube flies for sailfish, I make up enough tandem-hook rigs for my flies with 80-pound fluorocarbon, leaving two feet to slide through each fly and serve as bite tipet (to protect against chafing from the raspy jaws of a sailfish), which I attach to the other Bimini on the 20-pound class tippet with a Slim Beauty knot.

Since the butt section is pretty heavy duty and rarely damaged during fishing, I only worry about having spares of the rest of leader. And because I normally carry a dozen rigged tube flies, I already have an equal number of leaders ready to go. Of course, I still carry spools of the three leader materials I use, and replace whatever leaders and tandem-hook rigs I had to discard before the next day of fishing.

Edited by TimS
removed link and added text

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What I mean by there are 12wts and then there are 12wts...

 

Add a Colton 13wt Torrent reel and 400 yards of 50lb Hatch or Jerry Brown hollow (in pink, because with this outfit in hand you won't need to further trumpet your masculinity)

Sea-Level-Extreme-12.jpg

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