The Riddler

NocQua Battery

59 posts in this topic

These Lithium batteries are odd. The one new from the factory get charged to 13.1 then an hour later it goes to 12.5. less than the old battery but lasts the longest....:laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Launched 4 times this weekend on one fully charged Nocqua. Low battery didn't go off with the Helix 7 si. About 15 hours total trip.  So far so good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 mins ago, The Riddler said:

Launched 4 times this weekend on one fully charged Nocqua. Low battery didn't go off with the Helix 7 si. About 15 hours total trip.  So far so good.

I don't think it will either, these batteries give you 12 vlts continuous until it just cuts off & dies ....... The  voltage doesn't fade off like sla's

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, it didn't cut off. So far so good. I brought two batteries down to CT for the hell of it and kept it in the truck. But didn't need it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi guys, absolute newbie to this forum and kayak fishing. I just purchased the 4.4 Nocqua and a Garmin Striker 4. I chose both due to price considerations and level of commitment. I know that I could have purchased a lead acid battery for much less....but Lithium ion batteries are the future.

 

I have some experience with lithium because of involvement with electric RC airplanes. Electric is a fairly new development in RC flight and is what is facilitated the outbreak of those annoying "drones". (Quadcopters)

 

These Nocqua batteries are first generation lithium for fishing. (hence I suspect the reason for the numbers of reported  failures on this forum) They seem quite sturdily constructed and because of the nature of lithium they should have life span up to 3X's that of lead acid batteries. Lithium can be discharged to a much lower level with out damage (hence my 4.4 purchase)...can be recharged many more times and are less affected by temperature changes, hence their use in electric automobiles.

 

The Nocqua charger is a "wall wart" charger and is suspect. Lithium batteries should be balanced charged. A quality lithium battery and battery charger each have a balance tap that controls and confirms that each cell is being charged equally (and safely). Lithium batteries are generally considered safely discharged @ 20 % capacity. A storage charge is generally 50% level. A large difference between cells in lithium batteries can cause rapid discharge from one cell to another, creating heat...possibly fire.

 

The Nocqua charger charges at a very low rate as it is not set up with a tap and lithium batteries should be charged slowly this way. A 22v, 6000 mAh lithium battery can be charged in as little as 15 minutes when charged from a balanced 50% discharge level. This Nocqua charger may take as much 6-8 hours to accomplish the same thing. These wall warts are inconsistent in their final charge levels. (Hence may be the reason for the differing final battery levels noted above.)

 

SAFETY DISCLAIMER: I will charge my Nocqua slowly with the wall wart for now. I will be certain to charge it on a fire proof surface or in a fire proof charging sack and will keep an eye on it. It is unlikely to be a problem (our phones and computers are lithium batteries and charge indoors all the time), but there is so little information provided by Nocqua, that my ignorance is not an excuse here.

 

That said, I still chose the Nocqua because of my familiarity with lithium and I liked the water resistant claim. I had thought about using one of my RC batteries to power the Garmin, but saw these and jumped in. There is a You Tube video showing how one guy powers his fish finder with an RC battery...Safely and with a battery smaller and much cheaper than the Nocquas.

 

At this point I like the Nocqua and suspect it is only one of the first lithium offerings that will hit the market in mass in the near future.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Sleddog said:

Hi guys, absolute newbie to this forum and kayak fishing. I just purchased the 4.4 Nocqua and a Garmin Striker 4. I chose both due to price considerations and level of commitment. I know that I could have purchased a lead acid battery for much less....but Lithium ion batteries are the future.

 

I have some experience with lithium because of involvement with electric RC airplanes. Electric is a fairly new development in RC flight and is what is facilitated the outbreak of those annoying "drones". (Quadcopters)

 

These Nocqua batteries are first generation lithium for fishing. (hence I suspect the reason for the numbers of reported  failures on this forum) They seem quite sturdily constructed and because of the nature of lithium they should have life span up to 3X's that of lead acid batteries. Lithium can be discharged to a much lower level with out damage (hence my 4.4 purchase)...can be recharged many more times and are less affected by temperature changes, hence their use in electric automobiles.

 

The Nocqua charger is a "wall wart" charger and is suspect. Lithium batteries should be balanced charged. A quality lithium battery and battery charger each have a balance tap that controls and confirms that each cell is being charged equally (and safely). Lithium batteries are generally considered safely discharged @ 20 % capacity. A storage charge is generally 50% level. A large difference between cells in lithium batteries can cause rapid discharge from one cell to another, creating heat...possibly fire.

 

The Nocqua charger charges at a very low rate as it is not set up with a tap and lithium batteries should be charged slowly this way. A 22v, 6000 mAh lithium battery can be charged in as little as 15 minutes when charged from a balanced 50% discharge level. This Nocqua charger may take as much 6-8 hours to accomplish the same thing. These wall warts are inconsistent in their final charge levels. (Hence may be the reason for the differing final battery levels noted above.)

 

SAFETY DISCLAIMER: I will charge my Nocqua slowly with the wall wart for now. I will be certain to charge it on a fire proof surface or in a fire proof charging sack and will keep an eye on it. It is unlikely to be a problem (our phones and computers are lithium batteries and charge indoors all the time), but there is so little information provided by Nocqua, that my ignorance is not an excuse here.

 

That said, I still chose the Nocqua because of my familiarity with lithium and I liked the water resistant claim. I had thought about using one of my RC batteries to power the Garmin, but saw these and jumped in. There is a You Tube video showing how one guy powers his fish finder with an RC battery...Safely and with a battery smaller and much cheaper than the Nocquas.

 

At this point I like the Nocqua and suspect it is only one of the first lithium offerings that will hit the market in mass in the near future.

 

You ever here of a noqua battery catch on fire during charge or in use?

Could be a day wrecker in a kayak.

 There are plenty of lithium choices now. With kayakers going to 7" and even 9" screens this 17.5 amp battery is  looking like a good option

Screenshot_20190307-075115_Chrome.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A former Tesla engineer has started Sila Nanotechnologies, which is about to revolutionize lithium technology. He has  found a solution for those pesky extra lithium ions.

19932138-D586-402D-86A8-77E34D975D88.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had my noqua for about a year. No issues to report. Had  lead acid batteries before. Switched over because of  the size and weight of the noqua is very impressive. Not a cheap battery but so far so good.

No issues charging with the charger provided. No fires while charging of fishing. Good luck with your decision.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How does fire come to light?:laugh:  No history that I know of.

 

My only complaint with Noqua was inconsistencies. So far as the weather has allowed me to get the kayak out this winter I have had no problems with running the Nocqua.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been using a nocqua 10 amp also without any problems.

 But there have  been reports of  lithium batteries that overheated,melted ,exploded in cell phones and laptops. Rare but they have happened. So far I havent heard of any meltdowns in a kayak.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"How does fire come to light"

 

Fire is VERY uncommon, but possible. I know of no such event for a Nocqua battery pack either.

 

My understanding is that a large and quick voltage difference between cells in a lithium battery cell pack may cause a fire. (I have heard and seen on You Tube that  a nail penetrating a lithium battery pack can cause such an event) I know one person who was charging a cheap RC battery with a cheap charger plugged into his "cigarette lighter" plug (a vintage Buick station wagon) in his garage and left it unattended. A fire occurred and the source was proven to be the battery. Dumb on his part. Lithium battery packs have wires connecting the cells that provide the internal series connections to yield the desired final voltage. Cheaper batteries often have cheaper internal connections and balance the cells less efficiently, or even possibly intermittently, because of lighter wiring and connections.

 

The quality of the Nocqua external covering and plug system would make me believe that the internal construction is quality as well. Even the box they sell it in is cool. I believe that the provided wall wart charger is safe to use as it charges at a very low rate. I have a few chargers for RC. I stick with FMA Cell Pro chargers as I know and trust them and I can charge RC batteries quickly. They are not cheap, but give you an idea what is out there. I would not use them to charge the Nocqua as there is no balance tap.

 

I am very happy with the Nocqua and it seems to be a good match for my Striker 4. It discharges slowly while I use the simulator setting to learn how to use the FF.  I have charged this battery indoors as it is cold winter here, but keep a close eye on the heat of both the charger and battery pack. I put the battery on a plate that I can pick up and throw out doors in case of a VERY UNLIKELY fire. I should probably be using my fire proof charging sack as well.

 

I found this discussion because I was looking for more in depth specifications on charging and discharging rates. There does not seem to be much out there yet.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, cheech said:

A former Tesla engineer has started Sila Nanotechnologies, which is about to revolutionize lithium technology. He has  found a solution for those pesky extra lithium ions.

There's a fluoride ion battery technology that's being developed, its been around for a while but they could never get it to work at a doable temperature, apparently it had to be pretty hot to work..... that's all changing....

 

Its said to hold 8 times the energy volume as lithium ion

 

 

https://cen.acs.org/materials/energy-storage/Flouride-ion-battery-runs-room/96/web/2018/12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After some more time with the Nocqua 4.4 and Striker 4 it looks like a good combo for my needs. The Nocqua is a 3-cell 3.7 volts per cell discharged voltage lithium battery set up yielding 11.1 volts when fully discharged. When fully charged the voltage is around 4.2 volts per cell, or 12.6 to 12.7. The "wall wart" charger charges up to 12.6 volts (or so) per the label and per a couple charges by me, just right for my needs.

 

As I understand it is not a good idea to discharge lithium batteries more than 75-80%; in this case 11.4 volts. Apparently this practice promotes long battery life. I have set my voltage alarm on my fish finder to 11.5 volts to give me some advanced warning.

 

It looks like my Striker 4 consumes about .2 volts per hour. In this case I should get about 6 hours run time with the unit before I need to charge it. My guess is a 10 Amp Nocqua would give me about 15 hours! From what I have seen so far the charger appears to charge a little more quickly than the Striker discharges.

 

A good combo for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.