Pad_Crasher

Favorite conditions for fluke?

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I targeted fluke from the shore for the first time this past year, and I did surprisingly well imo. I had a handful of keepers and a whole mess of shorts. I stuck to the bay where it's sandy, not sod banks or mud flats, though I will try those areas this year. I mostly used a 3/4 oz bucktail tipped with gulp or pork rind, with a gulp shrimp teaser. 75% of my fish were on the teaser. I'd find a spot with some soft structure, cast in all directions, slowly working the bucktail back. Sometimes almost using a pencil popper technique, also known as the skinner method. It imparts a lot of action on the teaser. That method seemed to be more productive for me, though others will argue. If no hits in about 20 minutes or so I'll move down the beach about 100' and repeat. Slack tide to outgoing were most productive for me, but I did also catch at low tide as well. Sunny with calm wind was most productive as well. I didn't pay much attention to wind direction, unless it meant muddy water, then I stayed home.

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10 hours ago, chitala383 said:

I targeted fluke from the shore for the first time this past year, and I did surprisingly well imo. I had a handful of keepers and a whole mess of shorts. I stuck to the bay where it's sandy, not sod banks or mud flats, though I will try those areas this year. I mostly used a 3/4 oz bucktail tipped with gulp or pork rind, with a gulp shrimp teaser. 75% of my fish were on the teaser. I'd find a spot with some soft structure, cast in all directions, slowly working the bucktail back. Sometimes almost using a pencil popper technique, also known as the skinner method. It imparts a lot of action on the teaser. That method seemed to be more productive for me, though others will argue. If no hits in about 20 minutes or so I'll move down the beach about 100' and repeat. Slack tide to outgoing were most productive for me, but I did also catch at low tide as well. Sunny with calm wind was most productive as well. I didn't pay much attention to wind direction, unless it meant muddy water, then I stayed home.

I've tried the Skinner fast jigging method a few times just to see if it works. It was not productive for me on land or boat. 

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Two hours on either side of the tide from a boat.  Slack tide doesn’t seem to work for me.  Neither does tide vs wind.  Cover as much water as you can.  Try a spot for a few drifts, if that doesn’t work move on.

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I jig slower then Skinner and was more successful than not using it. It seems to me the water in Long Island is much clearer then SJ. Also when you are drifting if you are not jigging your jig is pretty much travelling along the same speed as the seaweed, trash and whatever down the bottom. I think the rapid movement indicates something in distress triggering the strike. Beach or sod bank I think the slow roll is better. It's actually not Skinner method it is his sons I remember to video of John telling his kid to knock it off and the son starting catching the rest is history.

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2 hours ago, Mono said:

Two hours on either side of the tide from a boat.  Slack tide doesn’t seem to work for me.  Neither does tide vs wind.  Cover as much water as you can.  Try a spot for a few drifts, if that doesn’t work move on.

20 knot winds blowing from the West and tide going out led to impossibly fast drift. When the tide changed, we were catching. So sometimes tide against wind works I suppose.

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The bite drops off during the slack, a) is it the lack of water movement that turns them off or b) the lack of food drifting by, time to troll just bumping into gear.

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On 1/7/2019 at 7:39 PM, Pad_Crasher said:

Bored boys and not much going on. Curious what your favorite conditions for fluke are. I don't have a boat yet so I don't really get to pick and choose exactly when I go. The whole reason I like fluking is because I love summer and that's when it is done. However, I have done well in the bay on rainy overcast days and have also caught during small craft advisories to my surprise. West is the best, two hours before/after tide, yada yada yada. What's your thoughts?

Mine are alone with phone off cooler filled with beer and no one on the beach.

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On 1/10/2019 at 2:32 PM, squidder 329 said:

The bite drops off during the slack, a) is it the lack of water movement that turns them off or b) the lack of food drifting by, time to troll just bumping into gear.

I get the idea that currents push bait and it's super valid but if you are in great bay away from the inlet, I don't really see how the theory applies there. Obviously if the boat isn't drifting you aren't catching which can happen during slack tide and no wind. There's still got to be some sort of effect that the tide has on the fishing even if not near the inlet or beach lip.

 

I would guess fluke stack up near sod banks and other ledgers during out going as bait gets pushed away due to falling tide. When it goes slack I guess there's just less activity so they go dormant. Someone with more experience should chime in.

 

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If fish are around, practically any time is good.  Learn how to cast and retrieve your jig head grub combo or bucktail properly and if they are there you'll catch.

 

BTW, I can't understand why jigging a bucktail/grub combo is referred to as the "skinner" method.  I was doing it it more than 40 years ago in Shinnecock Bay slaying fish and still do.

 

Different is I didn't have a video camera and he does or we'd be calling it the Spigola method.

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Correct. Many are newer to the sport and aren't aware that jigging a bucktail with trailer is one of the oldest saltwater fishing methods out there. It's all about "messaging," to use current parlance. :cool:

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Spig you have to get a you tube channel.

 

I think they move around but not far, first out they have to spin around to face the current. If it's ebb tide maybe they have to move deeper or move to the other side of the channel to catch a stronger current. For that matter do they target different bait on different tides, how many times have you gone fish less on one tide and game on on the other tide. That's why they are so much fun to catch.

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I watched in the fall, fluke going airborne in 1-2 feet of water chaseing mullet, catching them at my feet in the wash on a bt or magdarter. Gulp should be outlawed, they don’t stand a chance when you make the gulp dance in front of them, it’s like crack to them. Except for a blue, I think they are one of the more vicious fish attacking there prey .

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